Jump to content
drcocktail

Tanqueray Rangpur & flavored spirits

Recommended Posts

What is this Rangpur of which you speak? We'll pick some up in the Quarter and discuss. I've never had it nor heard of it. Out of the proverbial loop, big time!

 

Thanks for this topic!

 

drcocktail, it is all good. I got it as did most of the other folks. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It's Nasty.

 

Did I just start a flame war? :devil:

 

For me, everything that been said in this thread is salient, and I' ve learned of a drinker profile I didn't even know existed.

 

Salut! --Doc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree it does nto have the tartness of a slice of lime squeezed in it, but it is passable.

 

I read that the FDA limits quinine to 82ppm in tonic water. I'll have to see if I can find the FDA guideline on it.

 

I'm thinking of buying cinchona bark and making my own tonic water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Limited is a very good way to put it. I love it for the few cocktails I use it in, but you really can't use it in a lot of recipes that call for gin.

 

A bar in Philly just recently had a Rangpur promotion, and their drink of choice was Rangpur and Ginger Ale. I tried it. It's not bad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I agree it does nto have the tartness of a slice of lime squeezed in it, but it is passable.

 

I read that the FDA limits quinine to 82ppm in tonic water. I'll have to see if I can find the FDA guideline on it.

 

I'm thinking of buying cinchona bark and making my own tonic water.

 

Could you transfer it into mg/l, you are better at it than me (though in the Neuchatel case we have hit almost the same score :cheers: ), I am currently checking how it is in Europe but my results are in mg/l.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I agree it does nto have the tartness of a slice of lime squeezed in it, but it is passable.

 

I read that the FDA limits quinine to 82ppm in tonic water. I'll have to see if I can find the FDA guideline on it.

 

I'm thinking of buying cinchona bark and making my own tonic water.

A few bloggers have written about trying this.

 

Filtering is the main problem.

 

The Cinchona bark powder sold at most herb stores is very, very fine, and getting it out of the infused solution becomes a real pain in the butt if you're using coffee filters or similar. I think you would need to invest in something like a Buchner Funnel to do a half way efficient job.

 

The other problem is a "barky" flavor. Personally, I suspect most commercial tonics are made either with chemically pure quinine or a distilled cinchona essence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since tonic water has low ppm counts of minerals and not near as much sugar as most soda, we can use 1L = 1Kg and just call it 82mg/L.

 

I got the 82ppm from Wikipedia.

 

A google of "FDA tonic Water" takes me to a FDA document where they talk about a 6oz glass of tonic water having 20mg of quinine which would put it at 85mg/L so it should be in the ballpark.

 

FDA document on Tonic Water

 

I've got a nice ceramic funnel I picked up at a flea market. I'm still in the process of cleaning it with caustic to get whatever is in it out before I use it for anything.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks.

 

I have found that generally in Europe, on average it is in the range 70-85 mg/l, however it is not compulsory to mention the actual content of quinine hydrochloride on the label (e.g. in Poland, it says only that it contains it; on the other hand in Slovakia it should be mentioned that it contains not more than 75 mg/l to be called so).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It appears that in the US Tonic Water contains Quinine Sulphate.

 

I wonder which compound is used in GB? This could be a significant difference in the tonic water from different countries.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Or hit it with gelatin and rack it. Gelatin won't pull the quinine sulphate out of solution but would get the suspenede particulate.

 

Probably much easier than filtering too.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Or hit it with gelatin and rack it. Gelatin won't pull the quinine sulphate out of solution but would get the suspenede particulate.

 

Probably much easier than filtering too.

Cool!

 

Thanks for the tip.

 

I will investigate, and may give it a go.

 

"Rack off" means siphon off, right? I need to investigate these beer making terms. Not a home brewer, so all new to me.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tonic water in the news, from the 27 June, '07 New York Times:

 

"Dissatisfied with the high-fructose corn syrup and artificial ingredients used to make overly sweet commercial tonic water, entrepreneurs are developing their own properly bitter versions.

 

"Charles Rolls and Tim Warrillow of London have concocted Fever-Tree Premium Indian Tonic Water using spring water, cane sugar, natural quinine and other natural ingredients. It is a mixer to be taken seriously. They also make bitter lemon and ginger ale. The tonics and sodas are sold in 6.8-ounce bottles, in four-packs for $5.99 at Food Emporium supermarkets.

 

"Jordan Silbert, a New Yorker, worked with food scientists before he started producing Q Tonic. It uses Peruvian quinine, is mellowed with agave syrup and has a somewhat more herbaceous taste than Fever-Tree. It is currently used at a few bars, including Gramercy Tavern and Milk & Honey. In mid-July, it will be available at Dean & DeLuca, where a four-pack of 6.3-ounce bottles will cost $9.99."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great to hear Brooks! I was getting tired of dumping out most of the Schweppes litres after it goes flat and I'm glad to see it becoming availble in smaller sizes and greater quality.

 

If anyone finds online vendors selling these two tonics please post a link.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes they do, and I've spoken to the principals about it and they assure me that the American contribution is exactly the same as their superb English product. Same quinine, same lack of preservatives, same real excellent sugar cane sweetening - no corn in sight. Color me thrilled. Moreover, they also offer Bitter lemon - quinine there too, and to fabulous effect.

 

I'd love all the Rangpur guys to really indulge in the juniper and, as with absinthe, move into a sensitivity to the underlying components. I think it might evolve their estimation. Take real lime (or preferably lemon) add a serious straightforward gin (Beefeater, Tanqueray, Boodles, Plymouth) and Fever-tree tonic....it's hard to better that. --Doc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doc, is your preference for lemon personal or is there a more over-arching reason?

Also, have you heard any buzz from across the pond about Blackwood's? I find it extremely crisp and satisfying.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While grabbing a bottle of Martini and Rossi Vermouth at our "liquor challenged" local liquor store today I noticed a bottle of Rangpur hiding amongst the middle shelf gins (Gordon's, Lewis and Clark and such). Of course I bought it on sight and am now enjoying a Rangpur and tonic. Yes this will be one of my regular gins. Good stuff!

 

Thanks Shaihulud for talking her into carrying this and the Plymouth. I owe you one, or two. :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Doc, is your preference for lemon personal or is there a more over-arching reason?

Also, have you heard any buzz from across the pond about Blackwood's? I find it extremely crisp and satisfying.

 

I don't know anything about Blackwood's that isn't in current press releases.

 

My preference for lemon could be said to be because historically it was supposed to predate lime in gin and tonic. The REAL reason is personal preference! :devil:

 

That said, the subjective artificiality I spoke of before is just as apparent with a lemon's oil as with that of a lime. Lemon vodka, lemon rum both also exhibit it.

 

Oh, and in either rum or Tequila, I prefer lime. In applejack I am on the fence: both taste great.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doc, speaking of rum, I have a good client of mine who is an aficionado of rum. I had showed him the LdF website with their Matinique rhums as well as the new releases. Have you (or anyone else) tried any of them? The XO looks amazing and I was thinking about buying him a bottle.

 

Any feedback?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not familiar with Rhum Damoiseau.

 

I've had the pleasure of partaking in a great deal of rhum agricole, though, and while I've had stuff that would remove fingernail polish, I tend to love the stuff. I'm an iconoclast. If Americans don't like a thing that another culture does, I'll bend over backwards to at least try and understand it. Rhum agricole fell into this category. I love the wild cane-y flavor of it. From the mildest - the American market-cognizant 10-Cane to serious agricoles with heartier flavors, I'm a fan.

 

I have to say, I was not even aware LdF offered rums, and your post led me there. There are so many wildly different rums in the world offered today, I must confess, I am a bit daunted. If we combine the "rhums" and the "rums" it is a vast list. Still, as with absinthes, over time, with it as a focus, I could become a real rum expert as a number of you are on absinthe. But nobody ever accused me of undue focus. --Doc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, I guess I'll let you know how they are then. I'm a subscriber to the same beliefs regarding "If Americans don't like a thing that another culture does, I'll bend over backwards to at least try and understand it."

 

It really opens your eyes. Not only to how close-minded we as Americans (or any country for that matter) can be, but also how other cultures and countries view us. While I was living in Madrid, it was amazing to watch some of the tourists who came over. The whole 'ugly American' stereotype was never to blatant.

 

Anyway, back to your regularly scheduled program. :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×