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#1 Joe Legate

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Posted 10 June 2007 - 07:56 AM

Roast Red Pepper Cannoli

Ingredients:
Sweet Red Peppers
Fresh Basil
Fresh Mozzarella

Roast red peppers over an open flame until charred.
Peel charred skin and discard.
Slice top and of pepper, removing seeds and veins. Discard.
Slice down one side of pepper, creating a flat red pepper sheet, approximately 3" X 8".
Place a 1/2" X 1/2" X 3" piece of fresh Mozzarella on one end of the Pepper sheet.
Spread fresh basil over cheese and pepper.
Beginning with the cheese end, roll into a nice fat cannoli shape.
Place cannoli in baking dish, coated liberally with Olive oil. Lightly sprinkle with seasoned bread crumbs.

Bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes.

#2 Brooks

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Posted 10 June 2007 - 08:06 AM

Great T, thanks. That looks like a recipe even I could make! (And what's not to love about those ingredients?)

#3 Stomp Brockmore

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Posted 10 June 2007 - 08:24 AM

This is awesome.

#4 Bluescat

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Posted 10 June 2007 - 08:38 AM

I'm making that as soon as the local red peppers come in!

Thanks! :thumbup:
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#5 Gwydion Stone

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Posted 10 June 2007 - 08:55 AM

I'm making that tonight!

T73, do you ever sweat your peppers? Right after roasting, put them in a Tupperware™ container (or just turn a big bowl upside down over them) for about 10 or 15 minutes. The peels slide right off.

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#6 Joe Legate

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Posted 10 June 2007 - 09:02 AM

I like that idea. I char the hell out of them and end up with red pepper char from head-to-toe. The charring isn't just to help remove the skin but really adds to the flavor. I like to serve the cannoli with some good Italian sausage and a bit of buttered orzo with pine nuts.

#7 Gwydion Stone

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Posted 10 June 2007 - 09:09 AM

Oh, I meant sweating in addition to the charring, not as an alternative. Ya gotta burn 'em up.

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#8 Pan Buh

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Posted 10 June 2007 - 09:49 AM

I always use a paper bag for the sweating.
And hot chili peppers instead of the sweet bells.

#9 monkeycurious

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Posted 10 June 2007 - 10:17 AM

I usually mix them (Sweet Red Bell) up with a bit of Extra Virgin Olive Oil, Sea Salt, Freshly Cracked Pepper and then sometimes I add some Balsamic Vinegar and then char them black on the skin.

You might not think the Balsamic adds anything, but it with the charring it adds some very nice.

I use a Lock & Lock for sweating, then I can store them for later in the lock and lock when done.
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#10 Brooks

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Posted 10 June 2007 - 10:20 AM

Attached for download is a dead-simple Italian recipe for White Beans With Sage. The finished beans are as silky and sensual as beans get. (Be sure to use good extra-virgin olive oil.)

Attached File  White_Beans_With_Sage.pdf   6.73KB   44 downloads

#11 Bluescat

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Posted 10 June 2007 - 10:32 AM

Oh that sounds good too. Thanks, Brooks. Which beans do you usually use?

I love getting more recipes..........all others need to move to this post now too!
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#12 Pan Buh

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Posted 10 June 2007 - 11:00 AM

Brooks, that is just the recipe I need right now. Sounds delicious, and I have sooo much sage growing around my house and it's all in bloom and drawing attention to itself and asking to be used. And I'm always looking for an excuse to make beans. I love 'em (and the musical possibilities enchant my kids ;) ). Except I think I'm down to just black beans in the pantry. Have to add them to the shopping list. Thanks.

#13 Brooks

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Posted 10 June 2007 - 11:25 AM

Oh that sounds good too. Thanks, Brooks. Which beans do you usually use?

They are good, Bluescat, but it's been years since I've made them, so I couldn't tell you what brand of canellini beans I bought.

I do remember reading somewhere that freshness is important, even with dried beans. Beans that have been in your cupboard for more than a year should probably be replaced.

PB, I hope you like the recipe. You're so lucky to have fresh sage growing outside your window!

#14 Bluescat

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Posted 10 June 2007 - 01:17 PM

Wasn't asking about brand......but the question was answered anyhow! (The recipe said navy or cannelini beans). I always buy beans bulk at the coop or market where they go through lots. Now I must get a new pot of fresh sage and basil going!
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#15 jcbphd

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Posted 10 June 2007 - 03:43 PM

Hooray for new recipes to try out in my new gourmet kitchen! I just ordered some yummy olive oil from this site. I also recently learned that I have a rosemary bush growing in my back yard. Now to find which box my pots and pans are in.
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#16 Grey Boy

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Posted 10 June 2007 - 05:05 PM

I always use a paper bag for the sweating.
And hot chili peppers instead of the sweet bells.

I like the way you think.
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#17 Martin Lake

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Posted 11 June 2007 - 07:47 AM

Spinach-Mushroom Quesadillas

Ingredients:

Sliced portabello mushrooms (about a cup)
Fresh spinach leaves, washed well and torn up
One tomato, chopped
Medium-sized flour tortillas
Sharp aged cheddar cheese (chopped fine or grated)
Goat cheese
One avocado, sliced really thin
Chili powder and other spices to taste

To make them, simply sautee the mushrooms and spinach together in a large pan until the spinach is soft and wilted and the mushrooms are cooked. Add tomato and chili powder toward the end of cooking and continue to cook until the tomato is soft. Drain off as much liquid as possible and set aside.

In a separate pan, heat some olive oil--just enough to give a very light coating on the bottom of the pan--until it's really hot. Turn down pan to medium and place tortilla in. Add avocado, cheddar cheese, and goat cheese and let them cook until they begin to melt. Add in spinach-mushroom mixture. Enough so that the quesadilla seems full, but not so much that it will bulge or spill out when you fold it. As soon as you're done with that, fold it over. You want the tortilla crisp, but not burnt.
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#18 hissykitties

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Posted 11 June 2007 - 02:18 PM

The lentil tagine that I prepared a while ago was a mashup of a few different recipes. Unfortunately, I didn’t write down what I took from each recipe and had been drinking that night, so the following is an approximation. It'll taste good. :)

Olive Oil
1 tablespoon paprika
1/2 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon ground cumin
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg
1 cup dried lentils (Canned can be substituted)
4 tomatoes, peeled,seeded and chopped
1/4 cup tomato puree
1 cup chickpeas, cooked or canned (if canned, drain and rinse)
1 cup carrots, cut into 1/2 inch diced
1 tbsp freshly grated Ginger
3 Garlic Cloves, crushed
Salt & Pepper to taste
½ cup Dried Apricots - quartered

In a medium or large saucepan over medium heat, warm oil.

Add the garlic, onions and chilies and cook until the onions begin to soften, about 10 minutes.

Add the paprika, cayenne, cumin, cinnamon, nutmeg & garlic and continue to sauté until the onions are tender and fragrant, a few minutes longer.

Add the lentils, tomatoes, tomato puree and water just to cover. Simmer for about 20 minutes.

Add the chickpeas, carrots, green peas. Simmer until tender, about 10 to 15 minutes more.

Towards the end, add the apricots to the tagine allowing them to plump a bit.

To serve - garnish with chopped coriander and serve hot with couscous

I would also recommend The Ethnic Paris Cookbook

Posted Image

by Charleston native Charlotte Puckette. It has more than 100 recipes that focus on the ethnic influences haute cuisine, many by immigrants from former French colonies. It also contains the names and addresses of the top ethnic restaurants, markets and shops in Paris. My mother gave me a copy of the book a couple of months ago.

I just found that there is a recipe from the book at Amazon:
Amok: Steamed Fish and Coconut Milk Curry

Amok is a classic Khmer dish and a staple eaten throughout Cambodia. As is often the case with popular dishes, recipes vary, depending upon who is in the kitchen. This is the version the Ta family serves at their restaurant:

Serves 4

Leftover lemongrass paste can also be used to marinate beef or chicken before grilling.

Lemongrass Paste:
6 stalks fresh lemongrass
1 2-inch (5 cm) piece galangal, peeled and roughly chopped
6 shallots
6 cloves garlic
¾ teaspoon saffron

1.1 lb (500 g) white, firm-fleshed fish such as cod, catfish or snapper divided into 4 portions

Marinade:
4 tablespoons Nuoc Mam
2 teaspoons sugar
2 eggs
7 oz can coconut milk
2-3 kaffir lime leaves, thinly sliced (or more to taste)
3 tablespoons lemongrass paste

½ white cabbage sliced into 2-inch (5 cm) pieces
1 fresh banana leaf

1. Prepare the lemongrass for the paste by cutting off the bottom of the bulb and trimming the stalk to leave 8-10 inches. Remove the tough outer leaves then chop lengthwise into 4 pieces.

2. Put the lemongrass along with the other ingredients for the paste into a food processor and blend until smooth. This mixture will keep for several days in the refrigerator. Makes 1 cup.

3. Cut each portion of fish into 2 to 3 pieces and put all of the pieces into a medium-sized bowl. Mix together the ingredients for the marinade and pour over the fish, turning the pieces evenly to coat. Marinate in the refrigerator for at least 1 hour but not more than 2.

4. Meanwhile bring a pot of lightly salted water to a boil and blanch the cabbage leaves 8-10 minutes or until soft. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain; pat dry with paper towels.

5. Spread the banana leaf out on a work surface and wipe clean with a wet cloth. Using a sharp knife or scissors, remove the thick spine that runs along the edge of the leaf then cut out four 10-inch (25 cm) squares. Soften the squares to make them pliable by quickly dipping in boiling water or running over the flame of a gas burner.

6. Position a banana leaf square over a small bowl, shiny side down, and press into the bottom to form a well. Place 3 cabbage leaves in the well. Add one portion of the marinated fish, then a quarter of the marinade liquid. Bring up the sides of the banana leaf and fold over the ingredients to form a packet. Secure the edges with toothpicks. Continue with the rest of the ingredients to form 4 packets.

7. Place the packets in a steamer and cook over high heat for 1 minute. Reduce the temperature to low and continue steaming for another 10–12 minutes. When cooked, the packets should feel firm to the touch.

8. Transfer the packets to a warm platter and serve with sticky rice.
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#19 Joe Legate

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Posted 11 June 2007 - 04:22 PM

I'm making that tonight!

T73, do you ever sweat your peppers? Right after roasting, put them in a Tupperware™ container (or just turn a big bowl upside down over them) for about 10 or 15 minutes. The peels slide right off.



Sweat the peppers!
Those were the easiest peppers I have ever peeled! :cheers:

#20 Boggy

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Posted 13 June 2007 - 03:00 AM

Chicken boats (de Volaille travesty somehow)

Chicken fillets
shashlik sticks
mushroom
bacon
cheese
schallots
red paprika

First of all, take shashlik sticks and on each of them stick:
mushrooms-previously boiled and fried bacon-cheese (gouda, maasdamer, mozzarella, anything alike)-schallots-red paprika. (The order may be changed according to one's preferences but should be repeated at least twice per stick).

In the meantime, beat chicken fillets so they are thin and each can be divided into two pieces. Salt and pepper them slightly as you wish.

Then, wrap each stick in chicken fillet piece, coat in yolks and bread crumbs, deep fry until they are beautifully brown.

Last but not least, put all of them into flame-resistant dish and off to the oven for some time.

They can be served then just as they are, or cut into two pieces, so they would look like boats (hence the name) with all the ingredients inside nicely exposed and presented.

From my own observations, bacon should be first class if it can be replaced with ham, whereas the best cheese to "glue" other parts would be the one you would use for your pizza.

Serve with salads, baked potatoes, etc just the way you like it.
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#21 Brooks

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Posted 13 June 2007 - 07:11 AM

Thanks — looks good!

Help us with some foreign terminology. What is a "red paprika"? Is it THIS vegetable, cut up in small pieces? Or a different kind of pepper?

#22 Brian Robinson

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Posted 13 June 2007 - 07:20 AM

I'm pretty sure that's correct Brooks. In Spain, they use the term paprika (pimenton in the spanish language) for red bell peppers. They also have the seasoning which we are more used to, which is made from the same thing, just dried and powdered.
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#23 Boggy

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Posted 13 June 2007 - 07:22 AM

Exactly :cheers: the one that shall be used and cut into pieces. I know there is always a confusion with both of them. Red pepper in Poland would mean spicy pepper like cayenne one.
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#24 Brooks

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Posted 13 June 2007 - 08:28 AM

Thank you. :cheers:

#25 Bluescat

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Posted 23 June 2007 - 12:38 PM

Here is the recipe I mentioned, Nymphadora......try it with any fruit once you can chew again! Hope you get pain-free soon!

Attached Files


Our life is frittered away by detail. Simplify, simplify.
- Henry David Thoreau

#26 Nymphadora

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Posted 23 June 2007 - 12:49 PM

Thanks, honey.
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#27 MMarking

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Posted 24 June 2007 - 06:18 AM

I had this dish in Paris about 12 years ago and it was soooo good that I had to try and reproduce it at home. It has since then become one of my and my daughters' favorites.

*2 roasted red peppers, peeled, deveined, seeded and cut into medium chunks
*1 T. all purpose flour
*3/4 - 1 C heavy cream
*Bow Tie pasta, cooked and drained
*Premium water packed tuna from a can (fresh tuna can be used also but we have always used canned)
*Fresh chives

Buzz the peppers in a food procesor with all purpose flour until smooth.
Heat about 3/4 C. heavy cream in a large skillet.
Add the pepper paste and stir until well blended.
Heat until it thickens and bubbles.
Add salt and pepper to taste, but not too much as to overpower the delicate peppers.
Pile pasta on serving dish and top with crumbled tuna.
Pour on pepper sauce and snip chives in tiny pieces over the top for garnish and a bit of flavor.

Aside from the time it takes to roast the peppers, this can be assembled in about 15 minutes.
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#28 Joe Legate

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Posted 24 June 2007 - 06:31 AM

Note to self:
Add Red Peppers to shopping list for today. ;)

#29 ejellest

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Posted 25 June 2007 - 08:26 PM

I made this with some lingcod a co-worker caught. A tasty, fast weeknight dinner served on top of fettuccine with some crusty bread.

Provencal Fish

2 Tablespoons olive oil
4 Cloves Garlic, sliced
1 tsp crushed red pepper
One 1 28 oz can whole tomatoes, chopped, liquid reserved
2 Tablespoons fresh oregano leaves, or 2 tsp. dry oregano
1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves, or 1 tsp. dry thyme
1/4 cup flavorful whole black olives (Nicoise, Calamata or similar)
1 Tablespoon Capers
Salt and pepper to taste
1 lemon, sliced thinly
1 pound firm white fleshed fish fillet (cod, haddock, lingcod...)


Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add garlic, reduce heat
and cook until vegetables are lightly browned, about 2 minutes. Add
tomatoes, reserved tomato liquid and all seasonings, olives, and capers.
Bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer 10 minutes. Check seasonings of
sauce. Preheat oven to 300ºF. Arrange lemon slices on the bottom of a
shallow baking dish. Lay fish fillets on top. Top with sauce. Bake 15
to 20 minutes or until you can put a knife through the fillets easily.

If sauce is thin, take the fillets out, and put the sauce back in the skillet, and reduce briefly until thickened.
Erik Ellestad
Bernal Heights, San Francisco, CA, USA

#30 Amber von Doom

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Posted 30 June 2007 - 01:24 PM

I made this with some lingcod a co-worker caught. A tasty, fast weeknight dinner served on top of fettuccine with some crusty bread.

...

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add garlic, reduce heat
and cook until vegetables are lightly browned, about 2 minutes. Add
tomatoes, reserved tomato liquid and all seasonings, olives, and capers.
Bring to boil. Reduce heat and simmer 10 minutes. Check seasonings of
sauce. Preheat oven to 300ºF. Arrange lemon slices on the bottom of a
shallow baking dish. Lay fish fillets on top. Top with sauce. Bake 15
to 20 minutes or until you can put a knife through the fillets easily.

If sauce is thin, take the fillets out, and put the sauce back in the skillet, and reduce briefly until thickened.



That sounds nearly perfect for summer. I've never tried using capers before. I'm nto even sure I know what it tastes like.
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