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Frogs' legs, a delicacy most closely associated with the French, is in fact, a Czech dish, according to archaeologists. Although the edible amphibians are closely associated with Gallic cuisine - so much so that English people refer to the French by the derogatory nickname "the frogs" - ancient Czechs were eating them more than 5,000 years ago.
Yeah, except that 5000 years ago there were no Czechs yet. The area was populated with Proto-Indo-Europeans who would become proto-Celts, many of whom would later settle in Gaul, merge with the Francs and become the French. More or less.

 

This is a little like saying that retired Jews settled Florida.

 

Nice try Hill. B)

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More or less, Hiram.

 

Interestingly, though, modern Czechs can take some credit for French escargot. More or less. We collect the buggers off our property and eat them. Neighbors report that in the not too distant past many of the locals collected them to sell to a firm that exported them to France. A little supplementary income. Now, I guess we'll have to revive the spring frog hunt, too. B)

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It almost sounds if he is, um, proud of it! Now if the Czechs had invented the first White Castle hamburger, or the deep-fried Twinkie, well, then you'd be talking.

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Mmm frogs legs...I'll have mine Provencale, por favor. :twitchsmile:

 

 

I don't know what's the matter with the Czechs.

 

Everyone knows the Russians invented everything. :twitchsmile:

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I assume you're referring to an accomplishment of Jára Cimrman, and yet I can't seem to find any surviving evidence of the fact. I'm sure you're probably right, and yet without evidence you know it's going to be impossible to convince anybody else. ;)

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Now if the Czechs had invented the first White Castle hamburger

Now that you mention it, it was a Czech that laid the foundation for the burger revolution.

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