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printmkr

interesting woodcut on eBay

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Interesting, indeed. Other than picking out a few very obvious words, it has no meaning to me other than as some cool old print and drawings. I'm guessing it's only a reference page about wormwood from an old herbal book and has nothing to do with Absinthe. Still, very cool and worthy of a proper frame and mat if it is legit.

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What's even more interesting is that it uses the term "absinthium" in place of "Artemisia."

 

Absinthium ponticum, Absinthium marinum... no mention of Artemisia that I noticed. Although this was written about 140 years before Linnaeus started the whole binomial nomenclature thing.

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Best I can make out T73 called it spot-on: page from an old herbal reference book with descriptives of the plants, where they're found and some of their properties and medicinal usages. The text uses what I assume is an old variant of pelyněk - what looks like "pelynět´" - for the generic term for wormwood. Interesting find.

 

The same dealer also has veronica, some mint and chamomile among a lot of other stuff.

 

But you'd be hard pressed to put together a whole recipe. :devil:

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What's even more interesting is that it uses the term "absinthium" in place of "Artemisia."

 

Absinthium ponticum, Absinthium marinum... no mention of Artemisia that I noticed. Although this was written about 140 years before Linnaeus started the whole binomial nomenclature thing.

 

I love it. Conclusive proof that the ONLY variety of wormwood that didn't grow in Czechoslovakia was Artemisia absinthium... :laf:

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Um, no. That was a little before Czechoslovakia existed. But if you keep it up sooner or later you'll get the dates narrowed down. :devil:

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Although this was written about 140 years before Linnaeus started the whole binomial nomenclature thing.

 

Who by the way celebrates his 300 year anniversary today.

Born May 23, 1707 in Råshult, Sweden.

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Um, no. That was a little before Czechoslovakia existed. But if you keep it up sooner or later you'll get the dates narrowed down. :devil:

 

Yes, I knew that, but saying "the lands where the wild Czechs did roam" seemed a little clumsy

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Although this was written about 140 years before Linnaeus started the whole binomial nomenclature thing.

Who by the way celebrates his 300 year anniversary today.

Wow.

And I could only stay married for six years...

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Who by the way celebrates his 300 year anniversary today.

Born May 23, 1707 in Råshult, Sweden.

:happybday: Happy Birthday Carl! Just remember: King Philip Cuts Open Five Green Snakes!!
Yes, I knew that, but saying "the lands where the wild Czechs did roam" seemed a little clumsy
I think that has a nice ring—and maybe just in time for a new word filter. :devil:

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Um, no. That was a little before Czechoslovakia existed. But if you keep it up sooner or later you'll get the dates narrowed down. :devil:

 

It fits pretty well with the 17th century alambics they have at that joint in Couvet...

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