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Hill's Czech style Absinth

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I forgot what I was gonna say. :twitchsmile:

 

The past has been rearranged. B)

 

And the future looks, well, it looks like it's somewhere out there in front of us. :wave2:

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Oxy, I agree with your suggestion on the difference between absinthe and absinth, but agree that the coloring thing should be left out. I don't think that there is any thing inherently wrong with an artificially colored, or strangely - read: orange, purple, whatever - colored absinthe.

One question about it: macerate only products? I think Wormwood Bitters (maybe if wormwood is that main flavor) or Absinthe Bitters (maybe if it has many herbal flavors including wormwood)? Any thoughts.

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Sorry, I keep forgeting that.

But still, there needs to be a thrid catagory. Macerate only are complatly different from absinthe and absinth. At least in my option.

Edited by scaper8

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Bitters is also a type of drink, that is reasonably close to what most bohemian-absinth is.

 

I would be for wormwood bitters although I doubt anyone would be willing to give up "absinth" even if they did give up its connection to 19th century france.

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Bitters is already a regulated absinthe term meaning the product has thujone in the 10-35mg zone.

 

With 11 mg/l-35 mg/l it enters the zone, but many labelled so prove to be far from either bitters that do not reach so high levels (they rarely cross 1.7 mg/l respectively) or absinthe.

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Ari, that's what I'm going for, classifing macerates on a similar level as Angostura Bitters. Bohemian absinths are liquors while macerates aren't.

But the problem with calling them wormwood bitters is the same as calling it absinthe bitters. In France 'wormwood' becomes 'absinthe' and 'bitter' becomes 'amer.'

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Ari, that's what I'm going for, classifing macerates on a similar level as Angostura Bitters. Bohemian absinths are liquors while macerates aren't.

But the problem with calling them wormwood bitters is the same as calling it absinthe bitters. In France 'wormwood' becomes 'absinthe' and 'bitter' becomes 'amer.'

 

A good point, although I'm curious if products like Angostura Bitters are renamed Angostura amer in france (Any of our france residing people know?). Although I will take a stab and say the french aren't their target audience.

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If the answer is that they use a different word, then macerates would just be "absinthe [other French word for bitters]," giving us four main catagories: absinthe, Bohemian absinth/Bohemian-style absinth, absinthe [blank], and absinthe substitues (i.e. pastis). That would work for me.

Edited by scaper8

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Oxy, I agree with your suggestion on the difference between absinthe and absinth, but agree that the coloring thing should be left out. I don't think that there is any thing inherently wrong with an artificially colored

 

I didn't say naturally derived colour, nor did I name any specific colours. I said natural-looking.

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Here are a few reviews of Hills taken from the Alandia website... Enjoy!

 

 

Absintheur Review: "Hills Absinthe"

 

Absintheur: Visitor 14.03.2007

Evaluation:

 

Mr. "Absinth Is About Effect" here to award my first ever 1 STAR RATING! Ah yes, this absinth truely has no redeeming value. Somehow the "herbal" taste just comes off as really artificial, but you know...SORT OF. This of course is a bad thing, as it looks and tastes really artificial and there is really just and undertone of an ATTEMPT at herbal flavour. And the 70% alcohol couldn't be more obvious. The bottle? Ugly, very ugly! The louche? Nonexistant. The price? Expensive. But as I always point out, a good thujone content can always make up for this to SOME extent. But hey, they even screwed this up! Much like the Strong 68 (which is at least better tasting, cheaper and has a sweet bottle) you can't even feel the secondary effects until you're half drunk, and if I have to be half drunk to feel anything that means I'm going to have to gulp down quite a few drinks of this vile thing that's as bad tasting as Vision (but is forgivable due to it's INSANE effects). And why the hell would I do that with so many better drinks available for less money? Why would ANYONE!? In any case, congratulations, Czech Republic; you're the only country to get both my 1 and 5 star ratings-both ends of the spectrum! You got the best and the worst! Unfortunately, today I'm giving you the worst. Congrats to Absinth 35, though, which ironically is the same price! So go and BUY THAT INSTEAD!

 

 

Absintheur: Visitor 19.02.2007

Evaluation:

 

Once and never more, this is the worst Absinthe from Czech republic (with Absinthium 1792). Chemical flavour and aroma, really bad colour. Only coloured alcohol - don't drink it.

 

Absintheur:Topi Niskala 04.02.2007

Evaluation:

 

Uuuugh! Truly foul tasting swill. Smells like some strong cleaning chemical, and looks like that too. I did not even bother to try this the traditional way and went for the "bohemian ritual". Tasted like cotton candy dipped in some strong chemical and the aftertaste was bitter, but not pleasantly bitter as wormwood. I managed to drink one glass and will never try this again! Oh, and no louche.

 

Absintheur:R.G. Gries 09.11.2006

Evaluation:

 

whoa buddy. this one is a real twitcher. the taste is aweful, but it has all of what one would need for their weekly dose of thujone. I was not impressed at all unless your intention is to get f*cked up! I would not recommend it to anyone.

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Those reviews are all from people who are trying to sell their own "french style" absinthe, and are just jealous of Hill's sales figures.

 

If people don't like the taste of Hill's, it's because they don't realize how much the family knows about making absinthe.

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Everybody knows that Alandia floods the Hill's listing with negative reviews so that people will buy Gold 68 and Blue Velvet instead.

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Those reviews are all from people who are trying to sell their own "french style" absinthe, and are just jealous of Hill's sales figures.
Well this review fits what WBT says:-

 

"Being a scientist and having had the opportunity to drink

100 year old Pernod absinthe from an original bottle (!),

let's clear up some wishful thinking in favor of facts: (1)

The Czech stuff (Hill's) is horrible tasting garbage with

green food coloring, and is nothing in flavor or effect

like real absinthe (yuk!). Sorry, but this stuff is a

marketing ploy. Don't waste your time nor money just to get

sick on this foul garbage. (2) There is only one way to

make real absinthe, and that is to distill it from the

proper balance of whole herbs. The ethanol concentration

must be high enough to extract the essentials. The notion

that putting crumbled wormwood in vodka, etc., is nonsense,

and certainly makes a horrible tasting concoction."

 

Entry number 81 in the 1998 Fee Verte archive. Source: TAB.

 

Entry 191 in the same thread is from Kyle who states:

 

"I have spoken to both Mr. Hill and Mr. Sebor

regarding their products. First Hill1s. Hill1s

claims to be based upon original Swiss and French

recipes from the 18th century."

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I looked into one of Mr. Hill's arguments that who are we to decide what absinthe really is. If he won't take out opinion how about German law. Here is a exerpt from German liquor laws. It is partially translated so a few words are still in german.

 

Kind 423a Absinth

Absinth is a Spirituose from ethyl alcohol of agricultural origin or out a distillate of agricultural origin:

A. with who courage herb (Artemisia absinthium L.) or its excerpts, in

Connection with other plants or plant extracts such as anise, Fenchel

and such a thing, is aromatized;

B. by Einmai and distillation one manufactures;

C. a bitter taste has and after anise or Fenchel smells; and

D. in the case of diluting with water a cloudy beverage results in.

 

Lets go through these one by one and see if Hills Absinth would be considered absinthe in Germany:

A: Maybe. Hill’s has Artemisia absinthium and other herbs.

B: Maybe. We don’t know the manufacturing process.

C: No, Hill’s does not have the anise or fennel smell.

D: No, Hill’s does not result in a cloudy beverage when diluted with water.

So by German Law Hill’s Absinth would not be considered absinthe.

 

A thought came to mind. Since, as the Hills web site claims, Hill's Absinth was popular during WWII and Czechoslovakia was occupied almost all the war, maybe the Hill's recipe was designed to get around the German prohibition. Maybe the recipe was as close as Hill's could be to real absinthe and still be legally sold.

 

Movak

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