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Hill's Czech style Absinth

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One more small question. The family name? Hill is not exactly what I'd call a common Czech name. (But then, neither is Garrigue B) ) Don't want to make a mountain out of a kopec, just curious.

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And I'm going to have Mrs. Hiram set two extra places at the dinner table next weekend, for Tom and his missus.
Excellent!

Places at the dinner table? Next you'll be asking us to wash our hands. Getting pretty fancy, it looks to me.

It was a figure of speech. We'll more likely be sitting around the yard and wiping our hands on the grass—assuming it doesn't rain.

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I'm saying that it appears to be something entirely unrelated to absinthe.

You mean this isn't a VW Beetle?

 

But It says so right there. And that's a VW motor.

 

post-234-1179765463_thumb.jpg

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Have plenty on Hill's on hand.

 

I tried that.

 

It made a really crummy emolient, so I went back to NutraDerm.

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I got my first tryke (motorized) when I was six. Since I was a farm girl and we had plenty of open space, mom thought I would be safe and not hit anything. Not true. I ran into her car, a telephone pole and the mailbox.

 

My driving hasn't improved much.

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By the way, Tom. What say you regarding Green Tree Liquors when they were advertising Czech Absinth Strong as such: Straight from their website www.czechabsinth.com

 

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Amazing, 10 mg per kilo is a very small amount of thujone; even less than the 10 mg per liter EU thujone limit for alcoholic beverages (not including bitters) as alcohol weighs less than water.

 

Because of this, Czech Absinth Strong has no more thujone than any of the French, Swiss or Spanish absinthes. The former will have no different effect than the latter; other than not tasting as fine.

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But it says it's from Sebor, not U zeleneho stromu, which is The Green Tree.

Aye, but Sebor is no more. A quick internet search I did came up with Green Tree also producing Czech Strong. Although, given the fact that the information came through a quick internet search, it may be wrong. If so, I humbly stand corrected.

 

From the website:

In 2002 our company became entirely independent and started it's own production, specialized on the Czech Absinth line. The cooperation with the Martin Sebor Distillery still continued.

 

However, after the sudden death of Mr.Martin Sebor in July 2003 the production of his distillery has been shut down, the distillery closed and our cooperation has been definitely terminated.

 

THen I did another search, which produced this website:

 

untitled.jpg

 

I'm just assuming that green tree took over production? Or maybe just took over the remaining inventory?

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This is a very interesting thread, and whatever else one says, it took courage for Tom Hill to come here and defend his family and their product. I disagree with almost everything he says, as do most of you here, but he does make one very valid point: much of the dishonest marketing of Czech-based absinths comes not from the producers themselves, but from their agents, distributors and online marketeers. It seems that Hills has suffered more than most in this regard. I will amend the FAQs on my sites to reflect this.

 

Ultimately though I think this a sterile debate: nether side is going to convince the other. The solution is to split the category once and for all, and for French style absinthe and Bohemian style absinth to simply go their seperate ways. I've outlined a few further thoughts on how to do this on my blog.

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Sounds like there's more of an Absinth syndicate here than I was aware of. My understanding was that Kyle Bairnsfather came in and started working with Martin Sebor. Sebor advised Kyle to become an owner, then died. Well, Kyle doesn't do any distilling that I know of, he's a filterater, so maybe the distilling side of it had ties elsewhere, like zelený strom. Which also seems to be tied to Hill's. But doing my own research I come up with a company seat for Czech Absinth sro (inc.) in Moravska Ostrava, which doesn't match anything historical I know about the geographical seats of Sebor, Bairnsfather, U zeleneho stromu or Hill's. Or L'Or, for that matter. Maybe Tom Hill can help unravel one or two of these threads for us. I have no doubt that there's a bit of a shell game going on here. I know some product lines of absinth are manufactured here solely for distribution abroad, and I suspect the majority of Czech absinth by volume is actually sold outside of the country. And the majority of that which is sold within the Czech Republic leaves in tourists' luggage within days. The manufactures don't put a lot of effort into domestic distribution. And the domestic market would, I believe, but more interested in abv than thujone. It is the middle men hyping the thujone, I have no doubt of that.

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I've been reading...and biting my tongue.

 

I know its been said repeatedly but - I absolutely hate that we give Hills/Sebor/Czech-sinth ANY validity at all. Wasn't one of the main goals of these forums to inform people that the crap (Czech-sinth) is not absinthe, never was, never will, and to be avoided at all costs - NO MATTER WHAT.

 

The fact that we mention this turpentine-mouthwash in the same breathe as "absinthe" makes me ill. I know it's not going away any time soon but we sure are giving it credit aren't we? I vote we keep the "it's not absinthe or absinth" mantra going.

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I like the definitions too. I would go simpler for the base definitions and leave out color requirements (although perhaps add that to be called a verte (as opposed to just green) the color needs to come from herbs, since that does have a flavor impact)

 

The big question is, how many bohemian-absinth producers would be willing to let go of the assumingly lucrative connection to 'french' absinthe?

 

Here and elsewhere there has been talk by those who like bohemian-absinth about Czech pride, but I wonder how many companies would be really willing to embrace that pride by admitting their products are a Czech creation with no connection to 19th century france. When the chips are down, what's really more important? Czech pride or the money brought in by the french absinthe connection?

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If only Oxy didn't believe that any of this is being made in Czechoslovakia still. :twitchsmile:

 

I do think he's onto something though. Although I wonder what the German, Austrian and crapsinth makers from other countries might think about giving the nod to the Bohemians for this product. I do think there's enough confusion in the term "Bohemian" that it could take the cultural (rather than geographical) spin and come out with a marketable twist. I certainly don't think anyone that is currently using it is going to want to ditch the term absinth anytime soon.

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Oxy's proposals are interesting, but the distillers in France and Switzerland might disagree. La Fee might be pleased, but the Czech distillers based in Moravia might not be.

 

Elsewhere, along with anonymous hate mail, I have received the following anonymous comment on my blog:

 

"Tommy Hill don't work for Hill's."

 

I think this issue has been raised in this thread before but I'm not sure that Tommy has answered the question. To me, it doesn't necessarily reduce his credibility, but I'd still like to know, please, Tom. Do you work for Hill's (or is this education you do merely a private indulgence?).

 

FWIW, I think the anonymous blog post was made in Prague (4 page visits to my blog from Prague earlier today).

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The fact that we mention this turpentine-mouthwash in the same breathe as "absinthe" makes me ill. I know

 

Hey, do not compare weirdly distilled (if) Hill's to well-distilled turpentine, some people are using it! ;)

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