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shinsain

Growing Wormwood

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Not a bad job but the commute would suck.

 

Ha! That is annoying. Did you call & correct them?

 

I doubt they're available this morning. Actually, it's a 2006 Colorado noxious weed poster I found on the USDA website.

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Maybe someone can help me with this. Had a single A.a. growing and back in July I harvested the main stem/flowers. I was letting the rest of it go to seed. Here it is about 6 weeks later, flowers are dark and might be producing seeds but now I have tons of new growth on the bottom couple of feet. Anyone else ever see this?

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post-670-1190587652_thumb.jpg

 

Ran across some Artemisia absinthum at the Lone Madrone Herb Farm in Paso Robles. Poor things looked like they needed a home.

 

According to the label, it repels dogs and cats!

 

~Erik

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Not at my house. The dog and cats love it. They don't eat it but they sure love to sit in it.

 

It'd been so dry, the deer have been eating the leaves (not touching the seeds/flowers). I'm thinking some poor hunter is going to get some very bitter venison this year. :devil:

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I know, Molly. I understand and even though I no longer hunt, I know how important it is that the deer population is thinned out to prevent disease and starvation. It's a tough call. Mother Nature is one tough girl.

 

Would you settle for "some poor family of a hunter?"

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Not at my house. The dog and cats love it. They don't eat it but they sure love to sit in it.

 

It'd been so dry, the deer have been eating the leaves (not touching the seeds/flowers). I'm thinking some poor hunter is going to get some very bitter venison this year. :devil:

Rats! Another wormwood myth busted!

 

Too bad you don't have fennel and anise growing, too.

 

Then they could get the full Absinthe flavored deer effect...

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I bought a nice A.a. plant last year at a local nursery. I put it in a pot in my backyard, and a few days later a stupid racoon or squirrel ate all the leaves off! I was really surprised. They did the same thing to my parsley. This year it grew back magnificently though! I had a bunch of branches about 5 feet tall. I cut it when it bloomed, dried it in the garage and gave it to a friend. I don't really get enough sun in my yard because of a large tree. I'm sure it would grow better with more sun. I would really like to get some pontica to grow too.

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Too bad you don't have fennel and anise growing, too.

Then they could get the full Absinthe flavored deer effect...

Louching Bambi?

My "Tribute Garden" pays homage to all the lovely herbs. :cheers:

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post-670-1190587652_thumb.jpg

 

Ran across some Artemisia absinthum at the Lone Madrone Herb Farm in Paso Robles. Poor things looked like they needed a home.

 

According to the label, it repels dogs and cats!

 

~Erik

 

AFAIK is great place for pigeons, other creatures are not allowed to enter my small garden. Hopefully, it will get better, it always does, that herb is immortal.

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The two little wormwood plants I got last fall (hopefully A. absinthium) are heading upwards of 4 feet already this spring.

 

Is it best to prune them back just after they flower?

 

How close to the ground?

 

~Erik

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Leave the bottom third. Yes, when in flower.

 

Also you can taste a leaf now. Just a small piece will be enough to tell the flavor. If you worry that they aren't AA, the bitterness will tell otherwise.

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If I may be so bold to suggest avoiding that "irreversible tripping ballz" flavor by crushing the leaves between your fingers which will release that delicious Wormwood aroma. It's fairly unmistakable and herbally delightful. Personally, I love the aroma of fresh Wormwood. Damn good thing, now that I think about it. ;)

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I'd go ahead and taste it. Srsly. Your plants look like absinthium but there are varieties that look close and aren't absinthium. One taste, you'll know.

The two little wormwood plants I got last fall (hopefully A. absinthium) are heading upwards of 4 feet already this spring.

 

Is it best to prune them back just after they flower?

 

How close to the ground?

~Erik

It depends on what you want to use them for.

 

Ornamental? Trim the flower stalks after they bloom. Prune as necessary to keep them pretty and bushy.

 

Herbal? Harvest as they first come into flower before the flowers are mature. That's when the flavor/aroma is at it's peak and none of the flowers has gone to seed. Cut to a couple inches above the ground. This early, chances are you'll get a second blooming. I've gotten as many as three in a season.

 

The smell of wormwood is very strong and is not lost in drying, especially when drying is done carefully; its flavor is excessively bitter and penetrating.

 

The tonic virtues, stimulative, vermifugal and diuretic, of wormwood have been known for a very long time and have rendered it of great use in medicine and the veterinary arts. It can perhaps be classified as one of our most valuable indigenous plants, capable in many cases of replacing quinine.

 

To supplement this information let us add that the grand and the petite wormwood are the varieties most usually cultivated. The grand wormwood is sown in spring; and transplanted in autumn; the petite wormwood is multiplied by cuttings, the seeds do not reach maturity in our climate. One plants these cuttings in autumn in well loosened and plowed ground; after which wormwood requires nothing more than some hoeing. One harvests the leaves and stems in July a little before full flowering; one cuts the stems to within a few centimeters of the ground.

 

The House of Pernod formerly used wormwood cultivated in the mountains of the Swiss Jura; today the use of the plant in the factory is such that cultivation of it has developed considerably in the immediate surroundings of Pontarlier where it constitutes a significant source of income for the farmers. The factory is thus assured, in spite of the enormous development of its output, of always being able to get absinthe herbs of first quality.

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Good_Garden.jpg

Maggie standing on the edge of one Wormwood field. You can kinda make out a few established plants although the ground is fairly covered with a carpet of babies. She's looking toward Blacktail Mountain Ski Resort in the distance. Over the edge in front of her (unseen) are 6 more small Wormwood patches.

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One of the neighbors is still pissed because he can't spell A-r-t-e-m-i-s-i-a. Another neighbor has the weeds growing as ornamental plants lining their driveway. T is constantly plotting how to steal them. :devil:

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Thanks folks!

 

Beautiful field T73!

 

As best as I can tell it is A. absinthium. Appearance, smell and taste seem about right to me. I've just never smelled stuff that I absolutely know is A. absinthium, so don't know for sure. I'll take a picture this weekend of one of the plants.

 

It was kind of fun, the other day I had a friend over who was tasting Absinthe for the first time. Kind of puzzled by all the flavors. Taking her to the garden the next day and letting her smell the wormwood, etc. really helped to put what she'd tasted the night before into the correct places in her sense memory.

 

~Erik

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