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Want Old Overholt bottle - pre-1970

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Want Old Overholt bottle - pre-1970

 

In my ongoing pursuit of an authentic Sazerac, I am looking for a bottle of Old Overholt pre 1970. If you have a bottle, know where one is (besides ebay), - please PM me.

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Where it was made. I want the older West Overton version before they moved. The taste changed considerably. They stopped producing Old Overholt in Broad Ford after a fire in 1965. So, I am looking for a bottle older than 1965.

Edited by snyder

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Have you had both before? Any idea what you'll have to pay to get an old bottle? Let us know if you are successful.

 

I'm an absolute noob when it comes to rye whiskey. I've got a bottle of the Old Overholt and a bottle of Michter's. post-97-1179379264.jpg Since I am an absolute beginner, I have no yardstick to measure whether the new versus old Overholt is better at constructing a Sazerac. Do you have favorites among the readily available rye whiskeys? Further, what brands of absinthe are preferred in a Sazerac?

 

All responses welcome, of course.

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Sazerac Straight Rye Whiskey. Period. I haven't had the old stuff (18 year, $245.05) but the 6 year ($25.00) is incredible. I can't get it here so I made Brooks send me some from NOLA when he was there. For me, until further notice, the definitive (whiskey) Sazerac is made with Sazerac Rye.

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Sazerac Straight Rye Whiskey. Period. I haven't had the old stuff (18 year, $245.05) but the 6 year ($25.00) is incredible. I can't get it here so I made Brooks send me some from NOLA when he was there. For me, until further notice, the definitive (whiskey) Sazerac is made with Sazerac Rye.

$245.05? Is that an eBay price or typo? The Sazerac 18 is usually $50-60 'round these parts. Though, since they only bottle a limited amount every fall, the price does tend to go up, as the year goes on, and the bottles get scarcer.

 

...couple googles later...

 

Oh man! I see it at that price on Internet Wines and Spirits! They're making a killing on that! You gotta buy it in October/November, when the Antique Collection is first released. Talk to Brett at Binny's next October!

 

Buffalo Trace/Sazerac also make an uncut, unfiltered, rye called "Thomas H. Handy". 132 proof, pure rye goodness. Highly recommended!

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Hmm. I wonder if that would make a good investment. 1000% return over a period of 12 years.

 

It probably isn't the same if you just buy bottles and stick 'em in the basement for that long though, huh? Or wouldn't everyone be doing it? I wonder what inflation does to that. Probably nothing. Hmm.

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I don't know much about rye whisky, but I might have to learn. I tried a sazerac last night and it blew me away.

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Yup, the Sazerac 18 year rye is really damn good and yes it is selling online for $200-250.

It's crazy to think that those bottles were selling for 50 to 60 bucks in August.

Stock up I guess!

 

I had Selmac and Nepenthes over last night for drinks and I made a Sazerac with the

6-year Sazerac Rye, Peychaud bitters, Jade Nouvelle Orleans and a lemon twist.

I am so in love!

 

I actually prefer Sazeracs made with Rye Whiskey to Sazeracs made with Cognac as they have a lot more spice!

 

I wish I still had a bottle of the Thomas H. Handy. I really can't wait until this year's release!

Edited by Deluge

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In making an authentic Sazerac:

 

First created to about 1870's they used various Cognacs

 

After 1870 is was almost exclusively Old Overholt which has a very nice flavor (since 1965 it hasn't been that great)

 

I've had both they old and newer Overholts and they are very different but some of that might have had to do with age.

 

I use the Sazerac Straight Rye Whiskey all the time and it's truly wonderful but I wanted to get a bottle of the older Overholt for the authentic Sazerac.

 

Tell the truth, I like it better with a Cognac than Overholt but I still want an older bottle.

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What brand of Cognac do you use?

 

I've used the Pierre Ferrand Amber as well as Frapin V.S.O.P..

Edited by Deluge

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Yup, the Sazerac 18 year rye is really damn good and yes it is selling online for $200-250.

It's crazy to think that those bottles were selling for 50 to 60 bucks in August.

Stock up I guess!

 

Internet wines has always listed it for that price. I was planning on buying a bottle back in August (or maybe it was earlier?), and it was still that expensive. They have a lot of good stuff, but you have to do your research, as sometimes they overcharge for some things.

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What brand of Cognac do you use?

 

I've used the Pierre Ferrand Amber as well as Frapin V.S.O.P..

 

 

Both Pierre Ferrand Amber and Martell XO.

 

There's a bottle of the Sazerac 18 on its way to me I bought last week and am dieing to try it.

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In making an authentic Sazerac:

 

First created to about 1870's they used various Cognacs

 

After 1870 is was almost exclusively Old Overholt which has a very nice flavor (since 1965 it hasn't been that great)

Source please? And who is "they"?

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We bought a bottle of Old Overholt when Damien and Becky to us to Speck's in Houston. That's how Impy taught them to make theirs. Unfortunately, we have yet to make one.

 

Now, the Sazerac that we had in Seattle was outstanding.

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Most folks go with Stanley Clisby Arthur's account from "New Oreleans Drinks and How to Mix 'Em".

 

According to him, the switch to Whiskey and the addition of Absinthe both probably took place around 1870:

 

Schiller's brandy cocktails became the drink of the day and his business flourished, surviving even the War Between the States. In 1870 Thomas H. Handy, his bookkeeper, succeeded as proprietor and changed the name to "Sazerac House". An alteration in the mixture also took place. Peychaud's Bitters was still used to add the right fillip, but American rye whiskey was substituted for the cognac to please the tastes of Americans who preferred the "red likker" to any pale-faced brandy.

Thus brandy vanished from the Sazerac cocktail to be replaced by whiskey (Handy always used Maryland Club Rye, if you are interested in brand names), and the dash of absinthe was added. Precisely when whiskey replaced brandy are moot questions. The absinthe innovation has been credited to Leon Lamothe who in 1858 was a bartender for Emile Seignouret, Charles Cavaroc & Co,. a wine importing firm located in the old Seignouret mansion still standing at 520 Royal street. More likely it was about 1870, when Lamothe was employed at Pina's restaurant in Burgundy street that he experimented with absinthe and made the Sazerac what it is today."

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Source please? And who is "they"?

 

These guys.

 

"They" would be the creators and city which it was born. Not many bars outside of New Orleans even know how to make one.

 

And the cognac/rye whiskey comment came from this:

 

"Around 1870, a gentleman by the name of Thomas Handy took over as proprietor of the Sazerac House, and the primary ingredient was changed from cognac to rye whiskey due to popular American tastes as well as to the difficulty of obtaining cognac at the time. " From Chuck Taggart, Gumbo Pages

 

And my Sazerac 18-Year-Old Straight Kentucky Rye Whiskey still isn't here! Damn it! Thought it would be today.

 

Tonight, I'm making a pre-1870 Sazerac with Hennessy XO.

 

goods_drinkup%202.jpg

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I've had both they old and newer Overholts and they are very different but some of that might have had to do with age.

 

I've had that problem with one of Sazerac Co. other products.

 

sazeracfixings.jpg

 

 

And it ain't Rye.

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Hey Imp,

 

That's quite the spread!

 

Are the Legendre bitters any different than the regular Peychaud bitters that are available today?

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Are the Legendre bitters any different than the regular Peychaud bitters that are available today?

 

I haven't opened the bottle, I suspect they are better than the modern product.

 

My guess is they may be closer to old Peychauds, (or possibly better)based on a conversation I had with a Sazerac person, Legendre did things differently than the modern way similar items are produced today.

 

From what my research is turning up, J. Marion Legendre was pretty talented.

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I've seen old bottles of various bitters and had always wondered what their shelf life could/should be.

 

I assume that you only have one bottle of Legendre Bitters?

Edited by Deluge

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Old Overholt, a 4-year-old rye that's got a crisp, complex flavor ... spicy with a touch of honey. It's an 86-proof whiskey
Chuck Taggart over at Gumbopages.

 

I'm not sure when he wrote that; but, Old-Overholt is definitely now only 80-proof.

 

That might be some of the reason you preferred the older one.

 

My father-in-law had an older bottle that I made Sazeracs with, and then I made some for friends with a brand new bottle the next day. I didn't pay attention to the proof at the time; but, I definitely noticed a difference.

 

Though, modern Old-Overholt is a perfectly fine Rye Whiskey, especially for the price.

 

If a bartender can't make you a good Sazerac with Old-Overholt, they probably won't be able to make you a good Sazerac PERIOD.

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I've seen old bottles of various bitters and had always wondered what their shelf life could/should be.

 

I assume that you only have one bottle of Legendre Bitters?

 

 

I know Abbotts bitters are very highly prized, and have heard stories of them being usable, I'd guess if stored properly they may well be usable.

 

Yes, just the one bottle so far.

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