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Blood sausage

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I like the "eat first, ask later" mentality. There's a lot of things I really like that I wouldn't have tried if I had known what they were beforehand.

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...I always ate first and asked after...

 

Good Advice- I may stop googling all the menu options & just wing it- I'll prolly be happier.

 

& Yes, my beloved chose the restaurant. :twitchsmile: I mean who out of the blue decides "Honey, we're having Austro-German for dinner" (other than my husband or a native of course).

 

There are 4 things I am pretty confident about:

1)If it ends in "kraut" its probably sour;

2) If it ends in "wurst" its probably a sausage;

3) I cant really pronounce anything on the menu- ( maybe I'll slur & blame the booze)

4) I will not be ordering the :Blutwurstgrstl, kipfler & sauerkraut .

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4) I will not be ordering the :Blutwurstgrstl, kipfler & sauerkraut .

 

Try

Rinder Rouladen, (beef rolls)

Sauerbraten (Vinegar Marinated beef)

or Jagerschnitzel. (Pork medalilions)

 

Kraut just means cabbage...

Sauer is sour.

 

& some who do not like SauerKraut like RotKraut.

It is made with red cabbage & is sweeter.

Krautsalad is cabbage salad, and also really nummy!

I prefer mine still warm.

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I love Scrapple; used to eat it every morning when I was younger living in Virginia. Now that I live here in Indiana, they do not sell it around here.

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As a kid, I grew up being served liver, heart, kidneys and tongue and never thinking anything strange about it. If I was a good girl, my childhood mother cooked lamb kidneys in a tiny little enameled skillet for me for breakfast. My sister and I always fought over the marrow in the beef and ham bones.

 

Last year I ordered veal kidney with bernaise sauce for dinner one evening in Paris. It was delicious. I thought my friend would was going to lose it having to eat her dinner across the table from me! She was a real trooper.

 

I do not and will not eat sweetbreads, rocky mountain oysters, chiterlings, tripe or anything else that is so disgusting that they have to name it something other than what it really is. (I put all winter squashes in that don't eat category, too. Yech.)

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I was ready to fall in love with you until you dissed tripe.

 

It may be negotiable.

Offfal folks have more fun.

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Fry a half pound of bacon till crisp and set aside.

 

Drain the bacon grease into a custard dish.

 

Dredge the calves liver (Elk Liver is great too) in flour and dust with black pepper.

 

Use a Tbsp or two of bacon grease in the pan and fry the liver.

 

After you have fried the liver set it aside. Slice up an onion and saute it in the pan ( add a bit more bacon grease if necessary).

 

When the onion is translucent add two Tbsp of flour to the pan and stir it around till it starts to brown. You might need a bit more bacon grease if it is all absorbed. Once the flour starts to brown add a cup of milk and stir it till it thickens. Add more black pepper to taste.

 

Serve the liver with onion gravy and crumbled bacon on top.

 

accompanyments, Rice and a vegetable of choice.

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I never could get into scrambled pigs brains and eggs.

 

Chicken liver is another matter. MMMMMMMMMMMMM Good.

My Mama would feed us "Brains n Eggs" for dinner when we were kids. I think she was hoping some of the brains might sink in. I don't think it helped a bit. It would be fine with me if I never eat brains again.

 

Rumaki? Oh yes, please!

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Rumaki is so good it doesn't even count as offal.

 

Except when I was a kid. My dad loved it (as I do now) and mom cooked it with some regularity. It made me gag (as it does my kids now). The sins of the father. . .

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We eat blood sausage here in Tampere, Finland.

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mustamakkara

 

 

Typical place to eat it is at the outdoor market in the summertime, sitting at tables underneath umbrellas. The thing to order is called "mustamakkara ranskalaiset" (black sausage and french fries), and it also comes with mustard, ketchup, relish, and lingonberry jam. Goes down really good with a cold bottle of coke.

 

Excellent stuff, but it has been known to produce a bit of gas for a day or two. Small side-effects to pay for such a delicious meal :-)

 

.

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As a fan of both food (that's why I'm so petite) and anthropology I can say that nothing really disgusts me in regards to food.

 

Blood sausage is eaten in so many different countries under so many different names ("drisheen" in Ireland, "blood pudding" in England, "chocolate meat" in the Philippines... though I must seriously bite my lip on that last one).... I've personally never tried it but would love to.

 

I've eaten bats in Guam, goat in Jamaica (Jamaican curry goat is the Best. Dish. Ever.) , seal back home in Alaska... gator, frogs, buffalo, worms... and various organs from kidneys to liver to tripe (menudo anyone? best cure for a hangover known to man).

 

I am considering doing my Masters in Anthropology (when I eventually get to that point) on a thesis based on evolution of our eating habits.

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:cheers: I remember as a kid when my father was stationed in Kirchgoens Germany. I had befriended a german boy when we lived in a village near the base and went to his farm one day to help his father slaughter a hog. I remember him shooting the pig in the head with a special slaughter gun. After he kilt the hog he strung him up and drained all the blood in a large container and proceeded to make blood saugage with it. it was rather good when he finished it some time later and gave my family some of it. I've been trying to find a german meat market to find some in LA with no luck though.

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Blood sausage is eaten in so many different countries under so many different names ("drisheen" in Ireland, "blood pudding" in England, "chocolate meat" in the Philippines

 

While I happily downed wok fried spider in Cambodia (but got serious food poisoning off a local Calzone..), in the Philippines the local delicacy I just couldn't bring myself to eat was Balut, a fertilized duck egg with a developing embryo inside that is boiled alive and eaten in the shell.

 

Probably no biggie for some, but just didn't sit right with me...

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My mother told me about her grandfather eating head cheese. I was about six at the time, I didn't believe her until she showed it to me in the store. I screamed bloody murder.

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Mmm. Headcheese. Add a little vinegar, raw onion slices and crusty rye bread and I have a meal. Another item for the shopping list.

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Blood sausage is eaten in so many different countries under so many different names ("drisheen" in Ireland, "blood pudding" in England, "chocolate meat" in the Philippines

 

While I happily downed wok fried spider in Cambodia (but got serious food poisoning off a local Calzone..), in the Philippines the local delicacy I just couldn't bring myself to eat was Balut, a fertilized duck egg with a developing embryo inside that is boiled alive and eaten in the shell.

 

Probably no biggie for some, but just didn't sit right with me...

 

 

It wouldn't have bothered me though I never tried it. My Aunt is from Guam, and they eat baluts there too. They have a photo of my cousin when he was just a baby sitting in his high chair with two tiny little duck feet sticking out of his mouth.

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I assume you all have been watching "Bizzare Foods" on the Travel Channel?

 

http://travel.discovery.com/tv/bizarre-foo...arre-foods.html

 

This guy travels around the world seeking out the weirdest "local delicacy" type foods he can. He chows his way through all sorts of strange and bizzare stuff, including Balut.

 

I think he's only "met his match" a couple of times. Durian fruit, and "Stinky Tofu"... although he also had problems with a rancid meat stored in fat in one episode.

 

I'd love to give fresh Durian fruit a try, I've got some durian extract that I've been experimenting with for use in cocktails, but haven't come across the real product yet.

 

Blood Sausage... love the stuff (when properly made... when improperly made it can be dry as sawdust). A semi-common ingredient in the "Big Fry" breakfast so popular in the UK.

 

And there is Hagis, another favorite of mine.

 

-Robert

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