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LeRoy

Jaegermeister

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Iwas just wondering if anyone here drinks Jagermeister? I notice a few sites sell

this. Now I have had Jegermeister a few times but I am curious if there is a difference in the taste of the, original recipe, or if it is truly a different recipe at all.I'm sure this is old news,but if anyone has tried or knows more about this I would love to hear.

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Q: What was left of absinthe after the ban?

A: Jagermeister

 

I am not sure how different the recipe is since the stuff is vile and overly sweetish.

I would doubt that any of them could approximate something decent and the legend of 56 ingredients is only the legend.

Jagermeister was once very popular among the hunters in the 70's but from that I have heard it tasted absolutely in the vein of other hunters' liqueurs (like Hubertus) and has not spoiled its image with pushy marketing it is well-known for nowadays.

As the company absinth24 sells a lot of "inventions" including cannabsinth I would not believe any of their words. Buying Jagermeister here and there makes no difference; I have had one bottled in Poland and later one imported from Germany with typical "Deutsches Erzeugnis" on the label and it was simply same.

If you are looking for real concoction that includes wormwood and is gently bitter, I do recommend Hungarian Unicum - at least they have never changed only dropped the alcohol content by 3%.

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Q: What was left of absinthe after the ban?

A: Jagermeister

 

I would doubt that any of them could approximate something decent and the legend of 56 ingredients is only the legend.

 

 

 

That's pretty much what I thought.There was a slight hope that mabey there were more herbs and less sweetness to the original recipe .I am always looking for something new to try.

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I have had one bottled in Poland and later one imported from Germany with typical "Deutsches Erzeugnis" on the label and it was simply same.

About once a year I might order a Jaegermaester at a restaurant, just as a change up from the local Becherovka. I'm no expert on this stuff. But I don't imagine they're changing the recipe for any of their near-neighbors to the east. How that compares with the product for the USA market may be a different story. I don't know.

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I like Jäger once in a while.

 

As for wormwood, I suppose it's not terribly unlikely, but I think the idea is a relatively modern one sprung from the same hope for a liquor/drug as what spawned the absinthe mythos. I've heard people insist the the "original" Jäger had opium in it.

 

As for sweet, the older version of almost any liqueur is likely to be sweeter than the modern version because people had a serious sweet tooth last century.

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At least here some of the ingredients are revealed:

 

http://www.blanchardsliquor.com/sku18417.html and in fact nothing special about them.

 

From German site I have found the following: saffron, cloves, ginger, coriander and cinammon. All ingredients are macerated for up to 3 days 6 times, then aged for one year, filtered, sugared and then caramel is added, and finally bottled.

 

Momo, try Jager with coffee (I have not had) but my friends were reporting that it knocks you off.

 

But classifying it as bitters is a HUGE mistake. And the price is NOT reflecting the quality (In Poland, it is not so cheap).

 

Still, Jagermeister's commercials with two stuffed deer heads disputing philosophically are really awesome :thumbup:

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If you are looking for real concoction that includes wormwood and is gently bitter, I do recommend Hungarian Unicum - at least they have never changed only dropped the alcohol content by 3%.

 

I'll have to pick up a bottle of that in an attempt to connect with my ancestors. It's being sold in the States as "Zwack", because they thought that would go over better than "Unicum"......

 

I found a couple bottles of original Unicum on eBay, only the shipping from Hungary is as much as the bottle itself.

 

Dammit, why does that seem so familiar???

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Sambuca, great thing btw is a distilled star anise-flavored liqueur that might contain Sambucus nigra, hence the name.

 

But it is far from Jagermeister. It is sold in two main types, white and black (Sambuca coffee) and the best acclaimed producers are Molinari, Ramazzotti and Vaccari (my fav ever since).

 

Sambuca is drunk neat, on the rocks, with water (it louches beautifully), or with three coffee beans (three flies as they call it) that is served en flambee and concerns the engagement in Italian families.

 

Galliano is lighter (30%) and fits more in the vein of Sambuca - it contains star anise as well plus vanilla, saffron and such. Giallano's creator was Arturo Vaccari. I have had Galliano once and have nothing against it but for the alcohol content ;)

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I like Jager once in a while too. It is an opening night tradition in our theater to pass around a bottle of it after the show. I don't mind it and keep a bottle around. I wish it was not so sweet and not so trendy.

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I admit, I'm a Jaeger lover, honestly.

 

I mean, in the realm of being an absintheur it totally sucks. It's WAY too sweet and cloying, too many herbs IMO clutter the flavor and it's way too thick.

 

But in the "Hey, everyone's got Jaeger...and it goes will with mixers" way of thinking, I like it alot. I tend to drink it at bars when I am drinking for the fun of drinking. I like Scotch for that, but that gets expensive quickly as every bar seems to think that if a drink says "Scotch" or "Irish Whiskey" it MUST be double price!!!

 

Yes, I'm a fan of Jaeger. There's nothing I can do.

 

T.

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Sambuca, great thing btw is a distilled star anise-flavored liqueur that might contain Sambucus nigra, hence the name.

 

But it is far from Jagermeister. It is sold in two main types, white and black (Sambuca coffee) and the best acclaimed producers are Molinari, Ramazzotti and Vaccari (my fav ever since).

 

Sambuca is drunk neat, on the rocks, with water (it louches beautifully), or with three coffee beans (three flies as they call it) that is served en flambee and concerns the engagement in Italian families.

 

Galliano is lighter (30%) and fits more in the vein of Sambuca - it contains star anise as well plus vanilla, saffron and such. Giallano's creator was Arturo Vaccari. I have had Galliano once and have nothing against it but for the alcohol content ;)

The first time I had Sambuca was with 3 fireflies and it was at the London Elizbeth's bar, north of Hyde Park. Good thing my room wasn't very far because I was a light-weight back then. The same night I had a La Bamba. It was a cinnamon flavored liqueur that was lit on fire. The bartender put his hand on the top of the glass, which stuck to it, and he swirled it around. First you inhaled the fumes and then pounded down the drink. I wish I knew what liqueur that was.

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It was a cinnamon flavored liqueur that was lit on fire. I wish I knew what liqueur that was.

 

Was it clear? Red? etc?

 

Saw this on yahoo answers: With Rumplemintz, you light it and then place your hand over the glass, inhale the fumes and then down the shot.

 

Saw the same example, but with Sambuca and also with Goldschlager.

 

Looks like it can be done with pretty much any of those types of liquers.

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I don't think it was Goldschlager, it didn't have any flakes in it. From what I remember, it looked like it was a dark drink. This was back in 86.

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Thanks for the input everybody!

If I can trick myself into buying something other than Absinthe, I will consider trying the Unicom.I have found it on several websites in the U.S..

:cheers:

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I prefer Tuaca bombs. Even got the glasses for them. :cheers:

 

Of course you have the glasses for them. I would wager that you have glassware for nearly every drink and occasion. ;) So how do I do a Tuaca bomb? I've got the Tuaca on the bar right now.

 

I recently had my first taste of Jager recently (I know, how did I make it through college + grad school with nary a drop of Jager?) and I really liked it straight over ice. Mmmmm, booze.

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Glad you asked. :devil:

 

I do tend to like to drink my beverages from appropriate glasses. It does add to the enjoyment.

 

Regardless, 'bomb' cups are inexpensive, as they should be, since they would have a tendancy to get broken if they were glass.

 

1) Get some of these. If you don't want to buy so many, let me know. I have a ton, so I can send you a few.

 

2) Fill the middle with Tuaca, and the outer ring with red bull.

 

3) Whack it back. They are very tasty.

 

You can also add in a tad bit of other tangy liquers or fruit juice if they are too sweet.

 

Alternatively, if you don't want to buy the glasses, you can fill a pint glass or anything similar with about 2.5 oz of red bull, and then fill a shot glass with tuaca. You can shoot them like you would an Irish Car Bomb.

 

Also, a quick follow up on those glasses, they can obviously be used to put a different spin on many cocktails. They are fun to play with when you've got a rowdy crowd.

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oh shabba I think I may need a few of those!! At bars around here, we just get the drink all mixed together. (So it's not technically a "bomb") I may have to share that website with all the bars.

 

I'm a sucker for things that coordinate.

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Thanks for the input everybody!

If I can trick myself into buying something other than Absinthe, I will consider trying the Unicom.I have found it on several websites in the U.S..

:cheers:

 

Keep it up, LeRoy :cheers: Unicum is a thing you either love or hate.

FYI it contains among others: wormwood, centaury, cinchoma bark, angelica root, cinnamon, gentian, cloves, cardamom, ginger, peppermint, melissa, rhubarb and few others. The secret of its "unicum" taste are perfectly set proportions and succesful marriage of bitter herbs and spices. Moreover, at 200 g/l of sugar it is not that sweet.

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I have some Jagermeister in my freezer. There it happily stays, I don't talk to it and it don't talk to me. After you've had Fernet Branca you're spoiled for anything else, ya know.

 

But I admit I'm intrigued by all this other stuff. Can't see finding any Unicum down at the local Meijer shifty takers though.

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It's WAY too sweet and cloying, too many herbs IMO clutter the flavor and it's way too thick.

At least Nyquil puts me to sleep.

I am following in jcbphd's footsteps, with the no-Jaeger whilst-i'm-in school-imbibering.

However, my local Pinkies does carry the Jaeger bomb glasses. The older, wrinkley-around-the-lips lady does say that the frat boys buy a lot of them. I think they put beer in the outer ring.

I held an impromptu tasting of the K53 in there(Pinkies) before the spring break, and it was fabulous. It actualy worked out, for the first time.

 

(Edited for drunken, uneccesary lewdness.)

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Herbal bitters are quite interesting, and I think much more popular in Europe than they are in the states. Lots of European countries seem to have their own proprietary herbal liquor. Becherovka is the Czech national herbal, but there are also lots of regional ones. Whereas they can be quite injoyable taken as an aperitiv or degestiv I'm just starting to see their usefulness in cocktails. Unfortunately, my time and inclination towards cocktails is not what it used to be. Maybe it's just a phase.

 

I've never had Fernet Branca but it's high on my list to try. I have had, and have in my liquor cabinet, Fernet Stock, a Czech brand. Every once in a while I'll have a nip. It used to be a common shot to do at the bars in Prague among the natives. Don't know if it still is. Also heard it affectionately referred to among its detractors as "coffin polish". I'm curious to taste how it compares to the Fernet Branca.

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