Jump to content

 

Photo

Question about Lachenmeier suggestion on thujone


  • Please log in to reply
67 replies to this topic

#1 Auguru

Auguru

    Naught the One...

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 659 posts

Posted 17 March 2007 - 10:25 PM

I have a question about the recommendations in the recent article by Lachenmeier and colleagues (see citation below). While he briefly notes the traditional method of macerating the ingredients in ethanol at 85% concentration before distillation, he goes on to the discuss approaches that should reduce the potential thujone levels in the distillate (to make sure the product is in compliance with EU requirements for maximum thujone levels). One is to reduce the concentration of the ethanol used in the macerate to 30%. I am a bit confused by this suggestion. If the testing of commercial absinthe (using more-or-less conventional methods) and testing of vintage absinthe has yielded thujone levels generally far below the maximum EU limit, why bother suggesting the change? Isn't a reduction in the ethanol concentration going to affect the extraction of other macerate-derived flavors? Might this change the character significantly?

Furthermore, he indicates varieties/cultivars of A. absinthium are available that basically do not produce thujone at levels of significance in the production of absinthe using the traditional methods. This seems a more logical approach if my concerns about changes in flavor/character are relevant.

Here is an excerpt from the paper:

POSSIBILITIES TO REDUCE THE THUJONE CONTENT

Today's manufacturers face the problem that they have to generate a distinctive wormwood taste, without exceeding the thujone maximum limit of 35 mg/kg. The selective enrichment of the bitter and flavor compounds, while keeping the thujone concentration low, was extensively investigated (45).

Tegtmeier et al. (46) compared a water extraction to an alcohol extraction method By the percolation with water or alcohol (30%vol) no thujone could be extracted, because the solubility of thujone in water is poor. Only by the application of ethanol 90%vol, it was possible to extract 0.18 mg thujone per g wormwood herb. When the method of digestion with ethanol 30%vol was applied, 0.17 mg thujone per g wormwood herb could be extracted. The largest yields were obtained, whenever the macerate of the wormwood herb was distilled (0.24 mg thujone/g). The use of hot and highly concentrated alcohol for the extraction should therefore be avoided to obtain extracts with a low content of thujone. Because the percolation with pure water might lead
to a loss of microbiological quality, the percolation with ethanol 30%vol is regarded as the method of choice. This method is described as being easy to handle and economic. Gambelunghe and Melai (47) verified these results. Wormwood macerated with ethanol 20%vol for 30 days contained only 0.2 mg/I of thujone, while the maceration of wormwood with ethanol 95%vol for 6 months contained 62 mgll of thujone. The consequence for the absinthe manufactures is that traditional recipes and methods have to be modified, in order to avoid thujone contents, which exceed the limit. The maceration should be done with low concentrations of alcohol and the wormwood herb should be separated before the distillation.

A possibility for the continuation of traditional recipes is to remove the thujone from the wormwood herb before the maceration. Stahl and Gerard (48) observed, that the extraction with liquid or supercritical carbon dioxide provides a fast, selective and quantitative method for the separation of thujone from the wormwood herb. Absinthin, which is responsible for the high bitter value of wormwood, remains in the herb. It is therefore possible to generate nearly thujone free wormwood herb and to use it for the manufacturing of absinthe. However, the application of this method for the manufacturing of spirit drinks was never described.

The most elegant alternative to avoid the toxic thujone may be the use of thujone-free wormwood herb, which is available in certain cultivation areas,IO.16 and appears to be perfect for the use in the spirit drink producing industry. With those chemotypes, it would be possible to produce absinthe with wormwood quantities on the basis of the traditional recipes, without the manufacturer facing the risk of exceeding the thujone limit.

Lachenmeier, D. W., S. G. Walch, S. A. Padosch, and L. U. Kroner. 2006. Absinthe--a review. Crit Rev Food Sci Nutr 46:365-77.

(Let me know if you want to see the complete paper).
"If I can't drink, I don't want to be in your revolution ..."
-- Emma Goldman

"Beneath the stars there are the bars that serve the bitter drink..."
-- Be Bop Deluxe ("Life in the Air Age" from the "Sunburst Finish" album)

#2 Ari (Eric Litton)

Ari (Eric Litton)

    Meega, nala kweesta!

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,546 posts

Posted 17 March 2007 - 10:45 PM

Interesting, Yes I would like to see the paper, it would seem like Lachenmeier is ignoring his previous work, considering plenty of bottles have been made under the limit (and certainly under the toxic limit) without any changes to the recipe or process.
"Oscar Wilde once traveled to an all-cat dimension and appeared on the Late-Late Show with Catman O'Brien."

#3 Gwydion Stone

Gwydion Stone

    Propriétaire

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,258 posts

Posted 18 March 2007 - 12:05 AM

My guess is that he's looking toward thujone-free absinthe.

I'm not against that in principle, but given that thujone is such a large proportion of the volatile oils of wormwood, it leaves me wondering how much of the flavor/aroma of wormwood in absinthe is due to thujone.

I know that there are thujone-free (or nearly so) varieties of Aa, but I wonder what they smell/taste like? I like the flavor and aroma of wormwood in absinthe, it means nothing to me if using T-free wormwood also results in wormwood-flavor-free absinthe. If I want that, I'll just buy an absinthe substitute.

In a nutshell, what I'm saying is that while thujone may be fairly irrelevant in terms of "effect" etc., what's the point of using castrated wormwood if it does nothing for the drink? Is it just so one can say that there's wormwood in it and therefore it must be absinthe?

This raises a lot of questions for the designation of absinthe.

Maker of Marteau Absinthe
Master Distiller, Gnostalgic Spirits Distillery
www.absinthemarteau.com
Confessions of an Absinthiste


#4 dakini_painter

dakini_painter

    Delaware Phoenix Distillery

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,825 posts

Posted 18 March 2007 - 05:38 AM

The original, full article can be purchased for $28 here.

A summary at PubMed can be found here.

"Good is the only investment that never fails." Thoreau.
"Don't you push me baby cause I'm holdin' low / and you know I'm only in it for the gold" Grateful Dead
Distiller and Proprietor, Delaware Phoenix Distillery, Walton, NY. DSP-NY-15019. www.delawarephoenix.com


#5 absinthe_de

absinthe_de

    Absinthe-Distribution.com

  • Member
  • Pip
  • 57 posts

Posted 18 March 2007 - 06:53 AM

My guess is that he's looking toward thujone-free absinthe.

I'm not against that in principle, but given that thujone is such a large proportion of the volatile oils of wormwood, it leaves me wondering how much of the flavor/aroma of wormwood in absinthe is due to thujone.

I know that there are thujone-free (or nearly so) varieties of Aa, but I wonder what they smell/taste like? I like the flavor and aroma of wormwood in absinthe, it means nothing to me if using T-free wormwood also results in wormwood-flavor-free absinthe. If I want that, I'll just but an absinthe substitute.

In a nutshell, what I'm saying is that while thujone may be fairly irrelevant in terms of "effect" etc., what's the point of using castrated wormwood if it does nothing for the drink? Is it just so one can say that there's wormwood in it and therefore it must be absinthe?

This raises a lot of questions for the designation of absinthe.


In short:
Does Thujone directly relate to taste? If so, T-free Absinthe doesn't make much sense.

#6 Ari (Eric Litton)

Ari (Eric Litton)

    Meega, nala kweesta!

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,546 posts

Posted 18 March 2007 - 08:00 AM

I'm against thujone free absinthe if it means changing the process to eliminate a barely existent pointless chemical.
We can do a basic test on how much thujone effects the average taste of absinthe, F-guy constantly rates quite high compared to most other distilled absinthe.
"Oscar Wilde once traveled to an all-cat dimension and appeared on the Late-Late Show with Catman O'Brien."

#7 tayker

tayker

    Advanced Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 897 posts

Posted 18 March 2007 - 08:40 AM

I'm against caffeine free and diet coca-cola.
When a person who is honestly mistaken hears the truth, they will either quit being mistaken or cease to be honest.

#8 Nymphadora

Nymphadora

    Very silly. Very silly indeed.

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,639 posts

Posted 18 March 2007 - 09:29 AM

I hate diet drinks, but when you are a curvy blonde, you have to drink such atrocities or the curves will quickly evolve to fat rolls. (sigh) :angry:
When I die, I want to go peacefully like my Grandfather did, in his sleep -- not screaming, like the passengers in his car.

#9 Pan Buh

Pan Buh

    Incomplete Absinthe Geek

  • Indefinite Suspension
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,850 posts

Posted 18 March 2007 - 09:53 AM

Ever hear of water. Very thirst quenching and zero calories. :pirate:

#10 Grim

Grim

    Distiller

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,210 posts

Posted 18 March 2007 - 03:04 PM

Nowhere in old protocols have I witnessed:
- the distillation of an absinthe macerate at >60 abv.
- the maceration of herbs prior to an absinthe distillation at even a degree below proof.
- macerations that occur, commercially, over so extended a period as he describes.
Leave it to me as I find a way to be,
Consider me a satellite forever orbiting,
I knew all the rules but the rules did not know me...
Guaranteed...

#11 Grim

Grim

    Distiller

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,210 posts

Posted 18 March 2007 - 03:23 PM

P.S.

L'Artisanale is a wormwood bomb with <1mg/kg of thujone -- legal for the Canadian market.
Leave it to me as I find a way to be,
Consider me a satellite forever orbiting,
I knew all the rules but the rules did not know me...
Guaranteed...

#12 Ari (Eric Litton)

Ari (Eric Litton)

    Meega, nala kweesta!

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,546 posts

Posted 18 March 2007 - 03:28 PM

Interesting.
Grim, was the Wormwood Blanche tested?
"Oscar Wilde once traveled to an all-cat dimension and appeared on the Late-Late Show with Catman O'Brien."

#13 Auguru

Auguru

    Naught the One...

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 659 posts

Posted 18 March 2007 - 03:31 PM

Grim,

As I understand the recipes/protocols (especially the Duplais on Oxy's site), it would appear the macerate is initiated by suspending the ingredients in 85% ethanol, after some period of time this mixture is diluted with water to bring the ethanol concentration down just below 60%, and the diluted macerate subjected to distillation (with guidance that the original volume of 85% ethanol be the guide for distillate recovery. Assuming Lachenmeier is proposing the maceration be accomplished using no more than 30% ethanol, wouldn't this significantly change the ability of the ethanol to dissolve the various oils and other substances solubilized by the ethanol? I am guessing this, in turn, would change what is volatilized during the distillation procedure? Is there any precedent in the published (or at least accessible) info on absinthe production that suggests this sort of reduction in macerate/ethanol concentration would yield a comparable product?

I am not criticizing his recommendation, just trying to understand the implications if such guidance were implemented.
"If I can't drink, I don't want to be in your revolution ..."
-- Emma Goldman

"Beneath the stars there are the bars that serve the bitter drink..."
-- Be Bop Deluxe ("Life in the Air Age" from the "Sunburst Finish" album)

#14 Grim

Grim

    Distiller

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,210 posts

Posted 18 March 2007 - 03:45 PM

Assuming Lachenmeier is proposing the maceration be accomplished using no more than 30% ethanol, wouldn't this significantly change the ability of the ethanol to dissolve the various oils and other substances solubilized by the ethanol?

Yes it would. And it should not be done. This is not to say, however, that an absinthe maceration reduced to such a degree after initially being treated with spirit of the strength of a typical spirit of wine would produce equal results. There is a difference.

...after some period of time this mixture is diluted with water to bring the ethanol concentration down just below 60%...

And what of tails?... Don't overlook that the particular protocol you're speaking of requires reduction by only 5 liters of water per 95 litres of finished perfumed spirit. In other words... do you really believe that bringing "the ethanol concentration down just below 60%" will result in a spirit that only requires 5 liters to reduce to 100 liters of spirit at 74 degrees?

Long story short: Lachnmeier's heart may be in the right place but his energies are in all likelihood misdirected.
Leave it to me as I find a way to be,
Consider me a satellite forever orbiting,
I knew all the rules but the rules did not know me...
Guaranteed...

#15 Ari (Eric Litton)

Ari (Eric Litton)

    Meega, nala kweesta!

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,546 posts

Posted 18 March 2007 - 04:04 PM

While I'll withhold judgement until/if I read the paper but I have to wonder who he talked to in-between this paper and one in 2005 which contradicts it. (and so far appears to be better backed up).

edit: removed speculation.
"Oscar Wilde once traveled to an all-cat dimension and appeared on the Late-Late Show with Catman O'Brien."

#16 Ari (Eric Litton)

Ari (Eric Litton)

    Meega, nala kweesta!

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 1,546 posts

Posted 30 March 2007 - 08:20 PM

After reading the whole paper overall it was good although the section quoted in the OP seems further out of place. After that section it goes on to explain the small amounts found in absinthe and why it doesn't matter.
"Oscar Wilde once traveled to an all-cat dimension and appeared on the Late-Late Show with Catman O'Brien."

#17 Jaded Prole

Jaded Prole

    Advanced Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 503 posts

Posted 31 March 2007 - 04:51 AM

Using 30% base for maceration would lose the distiller a lot more than thujone. Many plant essences including anise require a higher ETOH percentage for extraction. LeFee tested as having no thujone a few years ago and while I wouldn't recommend it as a quality absinthe, I liked it at the time and found it quite satisfying as far as secondaries.

#18 ShaiHulud

ShaiHulud

    Dr. Valentin Magnan wannabe

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 2,385 posts

Posted 31 March 2007 - 07:59 AM

Is it possible/feasible/desirable to macerate different herbs/etc separately in varying %ags of ETOH and then combine the "pots" just prior to or just after distillation?

I really know nothing about this but it seems that one could do a 30% AA and an 85% anise and all maceration and then combine at some point. I agree though that it seems pointless to reduce the thujone and who wants to drink Absinthe without the wormwood flavour?
Litany against fear of Absinthe - I must not fear Absinthe. Fear is the mind-killer. Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration. I will face my Absinthe. I will permit it to pass over me and through me. And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path. Where the Absinthe has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.

#19 Gwydion Stone

Gwydion Stone

    Propriétaire

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,258 posts

Posted 31 March 2007 - 10:05 AM

Sounds too complicated and unnecessary to me. I was just speculating about the flavor potentials of thujone in the wormwood oils—I have no idea how much part it plays, yet.

As a general response to the topic:

I read the full article in question recently, as well as another recent paper detailing a full study.
The citation above comes from an article (not a science paper) Dr. Lachenmeier wrote which summarizes his work and findings to date. It's only a small portion of the full article and doesn't represent the purpose of the piece. I don't think Dr. Lachenmeier's energies are misdirected at all. The article goes a long way toward establishing a sensible and traditional definition of absinthe:

"The alcoholic beverage absinthe is recently experiencing a revival after a yearlong prohibition. This review article provides information on all aspects of this bitter spirit and its major components, especially wormwood (Artemisia absinthium L.), which contains the toxic monoterpene thujone. Over 100 references on historic and current literature are provided. The topics comprise the history of the alcoholic drink starting from its invention in the eighteenth century. Historical and modern recipes are discussed in the context of different quality categories and possibilities to reduce the content of thujone are given. The analytical techniques used to verify compliance with the maximum limit of thujone as well as further possibilities for quality control of absinthe are discussed. The toxicology of absinthe is reviewed with regard to the cause of a syndrome called “absinthism,” which was described after chronic abuse of the spirit in the nineteenth century. Finally, a food regulatory and food chemical evaluation is provided and minimum requirements for absinthe are suggested. Absinthe should have a recognizable wormwood flavor and after dilution with water the characteristic clouding should arise (louche-effect). Products, which are advertized as being of premium grade should be made by distillation, should have an alcoholic strength of at least 45%vol, and should not contain artificial dye."

So allow me to back-pedal: It's been demonstrated that thujone is probably* irrelevant in terms of quality and historicity of the drink, and in the light of thujone-free chemotypes of Artemisia absinthium found throughout Europe (including France) thujone itself isn't a reliable marker in the authenticity of a given absinthe, thujone only remains of concern to two opposite factions: regulatory agencies and mercantile interests. The agencies want to protect the public from harm, the merchants want to use thujone as a marketing tool.

This means that a thujone-free absinthe can not only be made strictly according to historical protocols, but that the FDA has absolutely no grounds for not allowing it into the US.



* I say "probably" because I personally have yet to taste the differences, if any, between t-free and regular wormwood in absinthe.

Maker of Marteau Absinthe
Master Distiller, Gnostalgic Spirits Distillery
www.absinthemarteau.com
Confessions of an Absinthiste


#20 Gwydion Stone

Gwydion Stone

    Propriétaire

  • Root Admin
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 11,258 posts

Posted 31 March 2007 - 10:11 AM

LeFee tested as having no thujone a few years ago and while I wouldn't recommend it as a quality absinthe, I liked it at the time and found it quite satisfying as far as secondaries.

The whole secondaries thing is quite the siren. I've had secondaries from a simple fennel liquor with no other ingredients. Fenchone? But then I've also had secondaries from Francois Guy, which tests high in thujone, but uses no fennel at all.

Maker of Marteau Absinthe
Master Distiller, Gnostalgic Spirits Distillery
www.absinthemarteau.com
Confessions of an Absinthiste


#21 Jaded Prole

Jaded Prole

    Advanced Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 503 posts

Posted 31 March 2007 - 01:23 PM

My point exactly. Thujone is really irrelevant and whatever gives some folks, (luckily me) the clarity and asthetic enhancement that I call secondaries remains a mystery -- and in my book, that's a good thing.

I was just speculating about the flavor potentials of thujone in the wormwood oils


Personally I have found wormwood oils to be toxic at any level and best avoided.

#22 dakini_painter

dakini_painter

    Delaware Phoenix Distillery

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 3,825 posts

Posted 31 March 2007 - 03:10 PM

I'm curious if anyone knows whether
  • A. absinthium has been sequenced (wild or cultivated)
  • sequence comparisons between thujone-free and thujone-active cultivars have been done
  • is typical cultivated Pontarlier A.a. a thujone-free or low-thujone variety

"Good is the only investment that never fails." Thoreau.
"Don't you push me baby cause I'm holdin' low / and you know I'm only in it for the gold" Grateful Dead
Distiller and Proprietor, Delaware Phoenix Distillery, Walton, NY. DSP-NY-15019. www.delawarephoenix.com


#23 Danny

Danny

    Newcomer

  • Neophyte
  • Pip
  • 8 posts

Posted 08 June 2010 - 10:17 PM

Question 1: If you evaporate away the from say 70% to 60% alchohol, does it ruin the taste experience of the Absinthe?

Answer : Not noticeably to my immature taste.

Question 2: Is the thujone remaining in higher concentration?

Answer : I can only guess yes - based on assumption.

====================================

I recently evaporated 3 samples:

500ml of Doubs Mystique (68% alcohol by volume = 340ml of Alc. )
500ml of Absinthe Supreme (70% alcohol by volume = 350ml of Alc. )
500ml of water

at 25C 50% Relative humidity for 60 hours.

I got:
47.0% reduction in volume of Doubs (235ml gone)
48.2% reduction in volume of Supreme (241ml gone)
9.0% reduction in volume of water (45ml gone)

Lets assume 45 ml of water left both alchohol samples So:

Doubs is 340 - 235 + 45 = 150/265 = 56% alchohol
Supreme = 350 - 241 +45 = 154/259 = 59% alchohol

I will assume the relative concentration of alcohol in the drinks were reduced by the above.



Observartions:

Color:

Both Samples slightly darker.

The Doubs started to get tiny black deposits. I presume they are herbs coming out of solution

Taste: - Neat
Both sample still tasted good. I noticed little difference, other than the missing heat of the alcohol.
Both samples were slightly stronger in taste.

Taste: With water: Almost indistinguishable.

Louche:
Both louche fine.

Effects:

Well I drank half of the supreme which is quoted at 35mg/Kg thujone. I did not notice any effect other than inebriation.

#24 Brian Robinson

Brian Robinson

    Shabba

  • Advisory Board
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,801 posts

Posted 09 June 2010 - 02:41 AM

Wow. One hell of a zombie thread.


Why exactly would you perform this experiment? What was your goal?*





*Before you start talking about concentrating the thujone for a 'better experience', I'd highly suggest you read some more of the science threads... ;)
Answers to common newcomer questions.

List of WS articles from across the web.


Help other absintheurs and newcomers by submitting a review. Click here to go to the main review page to submit your entry.

Rantings of a DC Gourmand.
WS on the Mutineer Blog!

#25 OMG_Bill

OMG_Bill

    Complete Absinthe Geek

  • Member
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,176 posts

Posted 09 June 2010 - 03:48 AM

I reduced a 750ml bottle of red wine down to 100ml to see what I could see.

Conclusion: I wasted a bottle of booze but science is science. I was trying to concentrate color. I was also evaporating the booze which left the essence (more or less). My goal was to make a booze pill of sorts. Drop the pill into vodka (the cheaper the better) and watch it reconstitute into a fine glass of wine.

<------- Bores easily. Wastes dramatically.




I put a whole egg in the bottle. A much better experiment. ;)
Some folks may cringe each time I use the term "Booze" regarding these high quality drinks.
I mean no offense. There are bottles of extraordinary booze out there. I've tasted a few. Relax.

#26 ignis

ignis

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 278 posts

Posted 09 June 2010 - 04:00 AM

Wow. One hell of a zombie thread.


Why exactly would you perform this experiment? What was your goal?*


Maybe just because he could and wanted to?



*Before you start talking about concentrating the thujone for a 'better experience', I'd highly suggest you read some more of the science threads... ;)



did he? where? ah bugger it give him a smack anyway he obviously isn't focusing on what the clique would consider credible Absinthe science :thumbdown:
"I just want silence. Jesus, it doesn't mean I don't like you. It just means right now, I like silence more."

#27 Brian Robinson

Brian Robinson

    Shabba

  • Advisory Board
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,801 posts

Posted 09 June 2010 - 04:44 AM

Slow your roll there, iginis. It's a valid question as to why one would want to adulterate spirits.

did he? where?

Well, one of his questions was whether thujone would be more concentrated, then later, he mentioned the misconstrued 'thujone effect' and whether it differed from his previous experience. I think my supposition was a perfectly logical one based on that.

And it's not about a 'clique'. It's about what's true and what's long lived fallacy based on misinformation from the 1990s.

Since one of our goals here is to dispel the myths, I don't see what your problem would be with telling him to read up a bit more on thujone and the facts surrounding it.

And if I wanted to 'smack' him, I wouldn't have included a winky emoticon... :tongue:
Answers to common newcomer questions.

List of WS articles from across the web.


Help other absintheurs and newcomers by submitting a review. Click here to go to the main review page to submit your entry.

Rantings of a DC Gourmand.
WS on the Mutineer Blog!

#28 ignis

ignis

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 278 posts

Posted 09 June 2010 - 07:02 AM

I understand that Brian but you must realise that even though you have a very clear agenda (that being the promotion and education of all and sundry about absinthe and it's sometimes dented rep) other people aren't thinking like you. I think he did this to see what the difference was after the experiment and he merely included his notes on thujon/wormwood as part of his overall report.

I don't think he was talking about the false drug effects of T and if he did it was to dismiss them without a thought.

When you say things like 'before you talk, you should read' it really sounds like a parent admonishing a child and does more to turn people away from your site/advice than it does to make people want to listen.

I have read alot of your posts and realised your not mean or an arse but sometimes your wording rubs the wrong way.

Mine does too, people point that out constantly I just thought I would extend to you the same courtesy.

Lastly the 'clique' thing is just a stir and not meant to be too insulting. There is a clique here and there but with the years you guys have under your belt it's not surprising.
"I just want silence. Jesus, it doesn't mean I don't like you. It just means right now, I like silence more."

#29 Brian Robinson

Brian Robinson

    Shabba

  • Advisory Board
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 12,801 posts

Posted 09 June 2010 - 08:13 AM

I have read alot of your posts and realised your not mean or an arse but sometimes your wording rubs the wrong way.

You might think I word things the wrong way. I think I word them directly, and to the point. Can't please everyone, I suppose.

We all understand that most people don't think the way we do about absinthe. Yet. But it's our responsibility to engage them and direct them to the truth. That's what the search function of this site is for.

When you've been around as long as many of us have, and have to deal with the same thing over and over and over and over again, you tend to shorten your responses to the minimal amount to get across the intent.

My intent was exactly that, to get him to read up some more.

does more to turn people away from your site/advice than it does to make people want to listen.

Based on real life experience, I'd have to disagree. ;)

If I wanted to be admonishing, there are much easier ways to get that across. I wouldn't have added a playful emoticon to the end of the sentence if my intention was to be degrading, rude, or overly authoritative.
Answers to common newcomer questions.

List of WS articles from across the web.


Help other absintheurs and newcomers by submitting a review. Click here to go to the main review page to submit your entry.

Rantings of a DC Gourmand.
WS on the Mutineer Blog!

#30 ignis

ignis

    Member

  • Member
  • PipPipPip
  • 278 posts

Posted 09 June 2010 - 12:44 PM

Ok mate, fair enough

cheers :cheers:
"I just want silence. Jesus, it doesn't mean I don't like you. It just means right now, I like silence more."


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Copyright © 2014 The Wormwood Society Absinthe Association