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WhyteKnight

Storage question

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Right now I've got 2 unfinished bottles that are cork finished, BdF and K57. I'm not particularly concerned about the K57, but when if I turn the BdF on its side, to moisten the cork, it starts to turn this kinda funky grey color. Should I be concerned about this? What I've been doing is just turning it back upright when it happens, but this lets it start to dry a bit again, which can't be all that good for it either. Ideas?

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Replace the cork - then stand it up.

OR you could move to Seattle where bottles get consumed faster than thay can evaporate, in which case you don't need the cork!

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Speaking of which:

I believe that Thu Jong Chang may have discovered why my Betty #2 is better than the others I've tried. After more experimentation, I shall reveal his secret aging technique.

Still waiting...

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Not being a particularly voluminous imbiber, I need a recommendation for a cork source. I don't want to recycle a wine cork. Nevertheless, I will need one soon since the cork that came in my bottle of Jade N.O. is fragile: no, even crumbly. I'd hate to have it fall apart and not have a good alternative available. I like the corks that came in my bottles of Suisse La Bleue and the Verte and Blanche de Fougerolles (they have wooden "handles" glued or otherwise attached to the cork). Can these be found at retail somewhere?

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Cellar Homebrew, up on Greenwood sells really grate T-corks. I know people that live on the east coast who liked my T-corks so much, that they mail order them from Seattle.

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Do T-corks come in different sizes? I had abottle of BdF with a defective cork that leaked slightly during shipping and came apart the first time opened it. I tred using the T-cork from a bottle of Montana absenta but it was a differnent size - no go. I ended up using a cork that came from a bottle of white wine, which to my annoyance never stopped smelling like wine (the cork, not the absinthe).

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For some reason, the T-corks that are sold in this area are apparently much better quality than people can get in other regions. I've had many people comment on how sturdy they are and ask where I got them. All of the homebrew shops up here seem to be using the same T-corks - which are sold for 20-25 cents a piece.

 

The "mushroom" T-corks are larger than the standard T-corks. They are designed to fit the 1.75ml bottles and I've seen some 1-liter European bottles (like the Swiss LB, Grappa bottles) that seem to need the mushroom T-corks.

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I've used those, and while they're good, I've still had problems with them when storing the bottles on their side. Usually the Plastic comes loose from the cork and I have to use a corkscrew to get the bastards out. Maybe I shouldn't twist when I pull them out but just pull straight...

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My bottle of N.O. had a completly dry and dead cork in it so I used the cork from a bottle of Hypntiq, the only good use for Hypntiq. I don't know if it's synthetic or not, so I may replace it with a dF cork since I have read about rubber stoppers giving bad flavor to the jades and I don't know if synthetic will do the same.

Careful twisting the t-corks, the one on my Vdf was a bit dry and twisting started to pull it apart.

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rubber stoppers giving bad flavor to the jades

 

 

Theoretically this could only happen if it were a stopper made from genuine rubber or another similar polymer. There are several different types of closures that are rubber-like in appearance. Older Verte de Fougerolles bottlings came with an inert polymer stopper that appears to be very similar to the supremecorq closure, but is slightly more rigid. Supremecorq is either a full silicone polymer or is silicone coated, and it looks like little lumps squished and/or swirled together into a cork shape. Some Hogue vineyards bottlings use this this closure so that is an option for a source of that type of a stopper if a person wants one. I happened to have one on hand when I needed a new stopper for my BdF. The supremecorq is the only synthetic stopper I know of that is also produced in a t-top version (The nomacorc and the neocork are both contructed of a foam like material if I remember correctly, and they're both obscenely difficult to insert and extract, which precludes this use. There's one other sort, called an Altec, that is made similar to the manner of an agglomerated cork, the main difference being that they use pure suberin with some sort of flavor-neutral resin binder, but I've only seen it in homebrew web shops) so there's a good chance that a supremecorq is what you got in your Hpnotiq.

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Some wineries have switched to synthetic cork substitutes. The traditionalists don't like them, but I feel its worth it to not occasionaly pay $15 for a bottle that smells & tastes like a skunk pissed in it. I'd be a little wary about using these in absinthe lest there might be something in it that would be leeched out by the higher alcohol content.

 

Last year I bought a bottle of Montana 68 absenta that came with a synthetic T-cork. Presumably, there's nothing in it that would leech out and affect the flavor (which wasn't bad, just slightly more anisey than the top CO's). I'd rather have this than the BdF cork that disenigrates during the first opening, a Jade cork that doesn't fit back into the bottle or a Segerra twist cap that strips and doesn't close tightly.

 

I also recently obtained a martini set that came with a cool-looking cone-shaped stanless steel and black rubber (?) bottle stopper. I'd was tempted to use this in my Jade, but I'm not sure how good of seal it would make.

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Interesting, so far the T-corks I've gotten at the local wine/brew shop have been pretty decent.

The owner recommended soaking them in water for 24 hrs before using them, so far no problems with the ones I've used.

 

 

Quote: MrGreenGenes:

I'd rather have this than the BdF cork that disintegrates during the first opening, a Jade cork that doesn't fit back into the bottle or a Segarra twist cap that strips and doesn't close tightly.

 

I heard that in the future, there may be a T-Cork accompanying your bottle of Jade, for when you need to re-seal it.

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That'll save a trip or two to the home brewing store.

 

I've only had one of the last 20 T-Corks crap out on me. They do work well if they are pre-moistened.

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I don't mind the occasional supremecorq stopper. It seems to be fairly inert. If its composed of silicone, as I suspect it is, that makes it a fairly ideal stopper for spirits, but not quite so good if you want a little gas exchange going on with your wine. The nomacorc and neocork stoppers are just so damned hard to extract and impossible to reinsert that its just not worth the aggrivation (for an example of this, look to the ultra cheapo bottlings from The Little Penguin). I wouldn't let rubber anywhere near a bottle of anything. Not even Thunderbird. :puke: It is my (possibly faulty) understanding that high proof spirits such as absinthe can deteriorate rubber and leech sulphur compounds from it, and only things like nitrile and silicone are safe for prolonged contact with it. As far as wine closures go, I'm convinced that stelvin/saranex caps are the way of the future for everything except wines that are meant to be laid down for long periods of aging.

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I've had no problems with the Tcorks from my brewshop yet.

 

I also hate those synthetic polymer corks in wine.

I've had some wines sealed with them.

The wine samples at the vineyard were excellent,

the wine we took home was excellent after 2 months,

OK after 6, and total crap after 8.

One of these vineyards used real cork in previous years

and a few bottles of Merlot were amazing after 2 years.

Not so now.

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Yeah. The current synthetic stoppers are really only suitable for things that will be consumed within a year or so of release, I think. The saranex lining that stelvin developed for their screw caps is interesting, in that it allows some air exchange. I'm curious to see what sort of results will be seen with it after prolonged study. A two year study recently determined it to be one of the better artificial closure options. I don't mind screw caps as long as they work and offer some aging potential such as this one appears to do.

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Bah. Who needs a cork for wine?! This is the only way to go!

 

Bag-in-box%203l%20pa%20stativ%20(6).jpg

 

Bag-in-box! Press handle, wine comes out. Release, wine stops coming out.

3 liters handy whenever. Frat-style wine.

 

I don't drink wine.

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That's why I like F. Guy. It's the one commercial absinthe I've had that I don't get tired of the taste after a while.

 

I turn up my nose at box wine in jest, but it's not always bad wine .

 

I've made mention elsewhere of an article in one of the local rags (Stranger, Weekly, who knows, & I'm having a terrible time trying to track down the article) that told of a wine tasting that was held several years ago.

 

The paper invited a bunch of hot-shot wine snobs for a genuine blind tasting. The tasters were blindfolded and had no clue what they were drinking. It many cases they couldn't tell fine wine from cheap wine - including boxed wines; French from Californian; and in one case, of all things, red from white.

 

I want to do the same thing with absinthe some time.

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I'll bet some oil mixes would score higher than VdF in such a test.

 

Are you going to have FG at the next event? I've been curious to buy, but I'd like to sample it first.

 

In the interest of science, I'll donate my Absente to your test. In addition to taste, we'll ask the testers to rate any secondaries they detect (see my reply to Ted B. in the other thread).

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No matter what the taste, you have to make fun of any wine that comes in a plastic bag with a spigot inside a cardboard box. It makes the perfect wine-bong, for sofisticated frat houses.

It sounds like those "wine expert" tasters were as qualified as some of the absinthe tasters in some absinthe competitions.

 

Speaking of secondaries, I always have thought it would be interesting to do a blind secondaries test, including things such as pastis and anis flavored vodka. Blind taste test comparisons with unblind tests using the new rating system would also be interesting, to show just how much or little brand names play in the ratings.

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