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BrotherO

Any herbs NOT allowed in a proper absinthe?

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You do have a point sir. I appreciate you're honesty and straight forwardness.

Thanks Shabba(post#180)

 

To Nymphadora(post#181)

Thanks my dear that though has crossed my mind.

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Your: Possessive pronoun. "Is that your dog."

You're: Contraction of you are. "You're a dog."

 

I guess there is a little difference. ;)

Tomorrow we will study there, their and they're. Tuesday's lesson will include to, two and too.

 

To Nymphadora(post#181)

Thanks my dear that though has crossed my mind.

That I suck! :shock:

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Um, I don't think that's the thought he was thinkin' T.

 

BTW some of us have already had our lesson in there, their, and they're today from our dear GB.

 

FV

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I didn't think so, Speedle. It was just another poor attempt at humor. I am a little disturbed at being on the same wave length as GB, however.

 

 

 

Oh... ;)

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Shabba(post#184)

you're friendly advise is very helpfull. Having a drink sounds great first round is on me :thumbup:

 

 

 

Hey T

The smilie said it all. Do You know what Freud would say about you're joke.

 

 

 

:cheers: to all

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I suck!

You said it not me. ;)

 

T73, you embarrass me. Once I fully realize and accept that there is no way that you are going to, nor are capable of, sending me 5 cords of wood per year, well, that is the day I stop being your loyal sycophant.

 

Fortunately, for you, I'm really thick and it's going to take a while. :pirate:

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T73-

Shouldn't we all have a little proper grammar instruction on the differences between absinthe, absente, absent, abyss, abscess and obsess? Infecting minds want to know.

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I like to keep samples of all the herbs commonly found in absinthe available. When absinthe friends come over, the conversation will frequently be about the various herbs. We look, we munch and eventually, someone will simply have to taste the Wormwood. :devil:

 

post-371-1176386153_thumb.jpg

 

Left: Common fennel. Right: Florence Fennel.

 

 

In particular, angelica seed has been hard to find. Further, while dittany has been described as a component in some absinthe, I have yet to find a recipe that indicates such, and no source for it to boot.

 

Likewise, the various plants that go by the generic name "genepi" have been difficult to track down.

 

That is quite interesting to hear since angelica is so common and I believe could be easily imported from Europe. With dittany it seems to be Arnold's invention just like his 260 mg/l, together with nutmeg as such a recipe I have not come across so far and if there is, it should published (anyone?).

Genepi (it might be Artemisia spicata or mutellina or glacialis L.) is so scarce because it seems to be growing only in restricted areas and might be protected by the law just as gentian (another Alpine herb), thus it happens to be more often used by Swiss absinthe producers and is rarely found in vertes.

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It's a grand thought, Baubel but I'm not a grammarian. I hack my way through the English language with a linguistic machete.* We were once frequented by a taskmaster and certainly, an authority of all things English although it was not his first language. Several of us would try but no one could match Sixela's skills in neither wit nor reason. Maybe GB will pony up to take the lead?

 

I'm just a theatre tech that enjoys playing with fire and electricity.

 

 

*Any subject-verb agreement in this posting was purely accidental.

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I wonder if any of the mad research team here knows of any historical records or modern experiments including meadowsweet in absinthe? Just seems to me that a little hint in the background would just go lovely.

 

Sorry, for bringing this back on topic. B)

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I can't say I'm familiar with meadowsweet, but it sounds more appealing than the so-called "cinnamon" flavor in the Montmarte (which I do not find appealing). My question, to follow up, is whether anyone knows if this is successful in a distillate? Clearly, not everything makes the leap from crushed scent, to macerate, to distillate.

 

As a corollary to the original question, I am wondering if there are particular combinations of ingredients that fare better or worse together? And then there are the relative proportions. Though angelica, calamus, elecampane, etc... are used, they are present in relatively small fractions. Is this because they are less appealing or tend to overpower the other flavors? I notice that if star anise is used it is often at less than a 1/5 proportion relative to the anise and/or fennel. Again, probably due to overpowering? I have a bias against star anise anyway. I suppose if it works at a concentration that enhances the louche effect without coming across as a star anise bomb, that would be OK.

 

What other generally unmentioned herbs are known to be used with success in absinthe?

 

Here is aggregate list of ingredients I have come across in the various recipes accessible on the web:

 

Wormwood (Artemisia absinthium)

 

Hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis)

 

Melissa/lemon balm (Melissa officinalis)

 

Petite/Roman wormwood (Artemisia pontica)

 

Green anise seeds (Pimpinela anisum)

 

Florence fennel/finocchio seeds (Foeniculum vulgare Azoricum)

 

Calamus/sweet flag root (Acorus calamus)

 

Angelica root or seeds (Angelica archangelica)

 

Veronica/speedwell (Veronica officinalis)

 

Dittany/burning bush (Dictamnus albus)

 

Coriander (Coriandrum sativum)

 

Star anise (Illicium verum)

 

Elecampane/Horse-heal/aunée root (Inula helenium)

 

Lemon grass (Cymbopogon citrates)

 

Génépi (Artemisia mutellina, A. spicata, A. umbelliformis and/or A. glacialis)

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I believe:

Roman Chamomile (Anthemis nobilis)

Peppermint (Agonis flexuosa)

Black Alder (Alnus glutinosa) (I'm not sure if that's the correct scientific name)

 

I believe you can also add Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) and Celery (Apium graveolens) but I don't recall the documentation on that.

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(I hit my head like the V8 commercial: my cut-and-paste left the Roman chamomile off my list... )

 

I should have thought of the peppermint, but I thought it was Mentha piperta. Is the species you mention (Agonis flexuosa) used for the same purpose (coloring/flavor)?

 

I am curious about the Black Alder, spinach and celery. Are these used primarily for the coloration step or for flavor too?

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As a corollary to the original question, I am wondering if there are particular combinations of ingredients that fare better or worse together? And then there are the relative proportions. Though angelica, calamus, elecampane, etc... are used, they are present in relatively small fractions. Is this because they are less appealing or tend to overpower the other flavors? I notice that if star anise is used it is often at less than a 1/5 proportion relative to the anise and/or fennel. Again, probably due to overpowering? I have a bias against star anise anyway. I suppose if it works at a concentration that enhances the louche effect without coming across as a star anise bomb, that would be OK.

Star anise in small proportions does this neat thing where it holds the louche down in the glass and makes the dilution appear heavy and oily. You can get the same effect from using a generous portion of anise, but the spirit ends up being too vegetable/"green". It doesn't take much star anise to dominate the scent, out of the bottle, with camphor -- so its best to limit the quantity in the macerate. Angelica, calamus, elecampane... they can all taste "hot" when you add more than the customary 125 grams per 100 liters. Cuts and methods of rectification can soften this result, but that takes time and experience to sort out. A good deal of herbal-interest is accomplished by giving hints of herbs in the spirit, taste and scent-wise. You overdo it, and people will know the game immediately.

 

In all instances, ageing can be your greatest ally.

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It'll be interesting to see PF 1901 or Duplais Verte with a Aged 10 years sticker on the box.

 

I should have thought of the peppermint, but I thought it was Mentha piperta. Is the species you mention (Agonis flexuosa) used for the same purpose (coloring/flavor)?

 

I am curious about the Black Alder, spinach and celery. Are these used primarily for the coloration step or for flavor too?

You may be right about the mint. I suspect more than one variety may have been used. In the case of Absinthe of Neufchatel, this but I have seen simply "mint" listed before, too.

 

A quick search:

I knew Spinach seemed familiar!

Looks like I remembered incorrectly on the Celery.

I'm very sure I saw "Roots Black Alder" in a recipe for Absinthe of Nimes".

And I bet we haven't cracked the surface. :cheers:

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I imagine aging (natural or artificial) would lead to mellowing of the bolder players, but does this not apply to the other ingredients as well? Wouldn't they "fade" and continue to remain behind the curtain, or at best peek around the edges?

 

I've read the "hot" or "peppery" description for some of these lesser constituents, so understand why too much would be just that. If a particular flavor was to be desired, why not consider "unconventional" herbs? For example, if a lemony flavor was wanted, why not consider adding lemon verbena? I haven't seen it listed, but the raw herb clearly smells great and might add the right note. Since it doesn't show up, is this an indication other herbs are preferred or is it more likely verbena flat out doesn't work? I guess what I am driving at is the short list of ingredients short because so many herbs/spices are wretchedly incompatible (even if the failures aren't heralded in the various "recipes") or are the potential winners left anonymous for the obvious reasons?

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Without any proof I'm guessing catnip has been used in absinthe before. Yes, catnip, Nepeta cataria. It actually has a wonderful flavor and very calming effect. And if it hasn't been used, I think it should be. ;)

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I like the idea of catnip as an ingredient. It would explain this famous poster:

 

post-97-1178982884.jpg

 

There is a "lemon catnip", too.

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I like to think it helps to explain why there are so many pussies on this forum. And I mean that in the most endearing terms. ;)

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They have never been considered as a spice since spices are those having no medicinal properties, they are herbs.

 

Are you freaking kidding me?

 

All spices started out as medicines... cinnamon, black pepper, nutmeg, you name it!

 

A "herb" is a herbaceous plant (botanical def.) meaning a plant lacking a woody stem...

 

Geeze.

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Martin Lake is 100% correct

 

Soon you're going to tell me that potatoes are fruit.

 

damn y'all come on...

 

Anything with a seed in it is a fruit.

 

Anything that doesn't have a seed in it, isn't a fruit.

 

Fruit = Tomato, cucumber, watermelon, etc.

 

Vegetable = Potato, Beet, Lettuce, etc.

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