Jump to content
BrotherO

Howdy, and other random thoughts.

Recommended Posts

Howdy. I stumbled in here from I'm not sure where exactly. I live in the deep south, so it's not likely I'll be stopping by any parties in Washington, but from what I've read so far the regulars around here seem to know a thing or two about Absinthe, even if they do seem a bit silly, sarcastic, and at times pedantic.

 

I've developed a taste for Absinthe, but I"m not sure exactly why since (and I know this may be somewhat blasphemous) I don't really care for the taste of licorice.

 

So far my favorite is La Bleue Clandestine. La Bleue has a flavor which I think is a big like dirt and wood. I don't know how else to describe it, but I rather like it. I had a Lemercier Amer, I think that's what it was called, and it seemd a bit to strong for me, but then I don't usually add any sugar or water.

 

I understand the standard ritual, the spoon, sugar, ice water, but I like my absinthe on the rocks. As the ice melts it causes a nice louche. The first sip will make your hair stand on end, but by the bottom of the glass the ice is melted and it's a bit more convivial. But then I start the process all over again with a fresh round of ice and spirits. Usually the ice doesn't melt in a uniform manner, like it might do in a more innocuous drink such as a coke. Instead the ice is eaten away in bits and chunks leaving jagged edges along the cubes.

 

If you do this with La Bleue it causes the anise to precipitate out in little white flakes that float to the top of the glass. You can avoid this by adding a little cold water before adding the ice, but sometimes I don't mind the snowflake affect, even if it does produce a slightly oily mouthfeel.

 

Recently I was in Spain, and wandered into a grocery store. There was only one sort of Absinthe in stock, Rodnicks. It was a bright green, so I assume it's artificially colored. It tastes strongly of licorice, but curiously there is no louche at all. Since the louche is caused by the anise, the usual source of the licorice flavor, you'd think it would louche nicely, but it doesn't. Maybe they use something else.

 

Hope to see some of you around the forums. I'm very interested in the actual process of making Absinthe, but apparently that's a bit of a taboo topic, at least the distilling part.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome aboard! :cheers:

 

BrotherO, where art thou in the deep south?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Welcome aboard! :cheers:

 

BrotherO, where art thou in the deep south?

 

 

I'm in Charleston, South Carolina. However, I"m considered a newcomer around here, since my family only goes back 4 or 5 generations in Charleston.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So far my favorite is La Bleue Clandestine. La Bleue has a flavor which I think is a big like dirt and wood. I don't know how else to describe it, but I rather like it.

 

I understand the standard ritual, the spoon, sugar, ice water, but I like my absinthe on the rocks. As the ice melts it causes a nice louche. The first sip will make your hair stand on end, but by the bottom of the glass the ice is melted and it's a bit more convivial. But then I start the process all over again with a fresh round of ice and spirits. Usually the ice doesn't melt in a uniform manner, like it might do in a more innocuous drink such as a coke. Instead the ice is eaten away in bits and chunks leaving jagged edges along the cubes.

 

If you do this with La Bleue it causes the anise to precipitate out in little white flakes that float to the top of the glass. You can avoid this by adding a little cold water before adding the ice, but sometimes I don't mind the snowflake affect, even if it does produce a slightly oily mouthfeel.

 

Hope to see some of you around the forums. I'm very interested in the actual process of making Absinthe, but apparently that's a bit of a taboo topic, at least the distilling part.

Welcome! Not sure about the dirt and wood bit! Claude-Alain prefers no ice, no sugar and serve water at about 46/48 degrees F. But I like your description.

 

And if you ever make it to Couvet, he can probably tell you a lot about making absinthe. Ending with the bit "But don't try this at home."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome! Going to a wedding there in June during the Spoleto festival (Saw Laurie Anderson perform there 5 or 6 years ago but haven't been to one since). Best she crab soup, too!

 

Nice town. Friendly folks. You are a newbie there! :P

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Welcome!

 

from what I've read so far the regulars do seem a bit silly, sarcastic, and at times pedantic.

 

That's not true. We're always pedantic.

 

And silly.

And sarcastic.

 

Welcome. :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome here.

Ignore the silliness. Some of these people are just silly. It's not just T73 either. It's LOTS of them.

Silly, just silly. And those other things.

 

Sorry, I might have started that last sentence with a conjunction or something like that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Everyone here is welcoming BO, must be a hippy commune. ;) :D

 

BO, the way you like your absinthe reminds me of how I've heard some serve Ouzo. I sometimes like making it strong with some added ice in the summer, but find on the rocks to cover up some of the flavors I like. Still nothing wrong with it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×