Jump to content
shinsain

Question about Montmartre...

Recommended Posts

Even single malt Scotch cask strength will louche but when people complain about it (who is telling them to dilute such a nobel drink that should consumed only with an addition of the same)

 

Cask Strength Scotch is supposed to be diluted with water. And most Scotch experts will tell you that, in order to properly bring out the flavors, every Malt and Batch Scotch should have at least some water added. The general rule is more water with younger Scotches, less with older, up until about 28 or 30 year olds, which don't really need any, since a lot of alcohol has already evaporated from the casks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

well, I agree if I do not do it but what about a proverb: "There are two things from Caledonian mountains preferred just as God created them, one of them is whisky." I have recently drunk 22 yrs old Glenkinchie (measured with alcoholometer it had 63%) that way and it was delicious; I add water only to absinthe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, I'm not saying that it doesn't taste good if it's undiluted. I'm just saying that the 'proper' way to taste a Scotch like a pro is with the addition of a small amount of water. Typically, I don't add water either, unless I'm doing a tasting event. Even so, we aren't talking about a 3:1 or even 2:1 ratio. We're talking just adding a small amount of water to open up the boquet.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So as you see we do the same :cheers: From that what I know it is the Irish that water their whiskey, but Scottish Highlanders never do. Personally, I do not like any water in spirits, no matter if it is cognac, vodka, grappa, slivovitz or even moonshine. Obviously, I sometimes dilute Polish rectified spirit :) When I first saw how they add ice to Remy Martin it was a shock :shock: of course, people in my country have different taste and such but ruining a decent cognac is a crime! That Glenkinchie was very mellow and rounded and its bouquet embraced from the glass even without the water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
When I first saw how they add ice to Remy Martin it was a shock ..

They sell a lot more cognac in countries like China where people are very happy to add ice, water, coke, etc to cognac. And remember that brandy was "invented" as a way of shipping wine more economically, with water meant to be added at its destination. So it's the Chinese who drink it correctly while us Westerners drink it the wrong way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The history how brandy was invented is still one of my favourite, in fact the brandy of that time was approximately 63% and at this point it really got audience. of course, the markets and people buying products differ but crime is a crime :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I see you know nothing about the Irish.

 

Maybe you’re getting the Irish name for whiskey confused with how they drink it. Uisce Beatha or "Water of Life"

Edited by Oscar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have seen a programme about Irish whiskey and there it has been said and presented that they water they whiskey, while in the other programme on Scotch whisky this time there was no reference to watering, so from these two come my ideas, so if you have other, share them

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Every Scotch book I've ever read, and every Scotch tasting I've ever been two, they have all discussed adding a small measure of water to scotch. Here are a few sources for you:

 

Malt Whisky: Discovering, Exploring, Enjoying Page 57 - "The professional preference is to reduce the strength of the malt from 40% abv to around 20% abv." ... "Adding water is essential with a cask strength whisky, particularly if it's over 43% abv. The sheer intensity of the alcohol can make it difficult to discern, let along enjoy, the flavor profile.

 

Instant Expert's Guide to Single Malt Scotch (2nd Edition). from page 43 - "The only thing malt drinkers add to their whisky is a bit of water... I suggest you start with a few drops and let your personal taste dictate how much water to add."

 

Whis(e)y from page 8 - [scotch Drinkers] disdain ice cubes, but will accept a few drops of water, which often help to reveal the malt's complexity...

 

From the Scotch Malt Whisky Society - How to enjoy your whisky - "The water ought to be soft and, as far as possible, tasteless. Tap water is fine if you are lucky enough to live in a society which regards the provision of good water as one of the elements of civilisation. Otherwise, use still water from a bottle."

 

Also, for those of you who enjoy your Scotch and live here in the states

 

I don't mean to appear as though I am berating you. Just a little info for ya. :cheers:

 

By the way, TASTING and DRINKING Scotch are two completely different things. When doing tastings, they highly recommend water to be able to discern the nuances of each malt you try. Typically when drinking, it's not necessary, but is still recommended.

Edited by Shabba53

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh, dear me! Another society out there! I am sure there are many more. Thanks for the scoop, Shabba!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks a lot, you have understand that we in Poland are rather new to Scotch and some things may cause us wonder, and unfortunately we sometimes cannot afford the prices for many brands. Btw, I am able to get a vintage J&B rare (bottled in the 80's or earlier) for a very reasonable price, do you think that I should get interested in it? Any suggestion is welcome

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No problem. Like I said, I wasn't trying to berate you, just educate. I love my Whisky, and I want to make sure everyone else does too. :cheers:

 

I've never been a huge fan of J&B, but if the price is right for you, I guess there's no reason why you shouldn't check it out. I"m not sure if you'll be able to get it for cheaper than a young single malt. J&B however is a blend, which isn't bad in and of itself, but will be different than drinking a single malt.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am teacher so I know how education is important. The price in USD would be around 40, the quality is quite ok, not much has evaporated and it is 43% so as I now no longer produced, on yheir official site is 40% version for that rare brand

Edited by absinthist

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm fairly skeptical about wormwood, or other non-anethol oils contributing to the louche. I know they can be brought out of solution under certain conditions, but I doubt in the amounts found in absinthe. If a distiller were to cook up a batch with no anise or fennel (or star anise), I doubt you'd get any louche at all.

 

I also realize that some people think of the little swirlies that happen before the louche as an indicator of oils coming out of suspension. But you get the same thing adding water to everclear.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I prefer my water and everclear 20:1

 

And forget the sugar cubes; three motrins in my spoon.

Edited by plunger

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm fairly skeptical about wormwood, or other non-anethol oils contributing to the louche.

 

Agreed.

 

If it did KOS would louche like a sumbitch!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm fairly skeptical about wormwood, or other non-anethol oils contributing to the louche.

 

Agreed.

 

If it did KOS would louche like a sumbitch!

All dissolved essential oils will cause a louche, regardless of what they are, simply due to the fact that they are oils and insoluble in water. When water is added, it mixes with the alcohol and reduces it's solute capacity, causing the oils to precipitate out of solution and form an emulsion (like mayonnaise :) ).

 

Whether that louche will be visible depends on the quantity, or more specifically, the concentration, of the oils in solution, not the specific type of oil. The effect is most commonly linked with anise because it is less aromatic than most other essential oils, and a higher concentration of the oil is needed. If most other aromatic oils were present in the concentration that anethol typically is, they'd be far too strongly flavoured to be palatable.

 

Wormwood oils do not contribute significantly to the louche simply because they are present in insufficient concentration. Increase the concentration of the oil, and and it will most definitely louche; but be completely undrinkable. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, now I can save all that money I was planning on spending on KOS Gold and Essential Oil of Wormwood, huh? :blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Wormwood oils do not contribute significantly to the louche simply because they are present in insufficient concentration. Increase the concentration of the oil, and and it will most definitely louche; but be completely undrinkable. :D

 

That explains why the home made absinthe-swill that I concocted in 1976 really did louche like a sumbitch...instead of the quarter ounce of wormwood the 1880s recipe called for, I substituted over entire ounce! :pirate:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×