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shinsain

Question about Montmartre...

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Good follow-up question, Lister. I'm anxious to hear what those in the know say in response. I too am using these posts to fill in my knowledge gaps on the science of the louche. Hmm, I like that phrase. The science of the louch. Now if I could only figure out how to TM it properly. :g:

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I would guess it's because the colder water chills the alcohol more and forces it to release more of the oils into the louche. In the same way, for example, that you can dissolve more salt into warm water than cold, warmer alcohol keeps more of the oils dissolved in it, preventing them from creating the louche.

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From now on, the Montmartre is being relegated to dealing with the very occasional gum infection, for which its highly herbal profile is extremely well suited.

Do you treat your gum infections with your teeth in or out? Just wondering for future reference. :P

 

I would guess it's because the colder water chills the alcohol more and forces it to release more of the oils into the louche. In the same way, for example, that you can dissolve more salt into warm water than cold, warmer alcohol keeps more of the oils dissolved in it, preventing them from creating the louche.

 

Exactly. If you chill the absinthe itself enough, you'll drop those oils out of solution without adding any water. I would advise against trying it though because you'll end up with more of an oily mess than a louche.

Edited by Lord Stanley

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So colder water helps the anethol to precipitate out of the solution more readily? Like I always say, "If you're not part of the solution, you're part of the precipitate." ;)

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Do you treat your gum infections with your teeth in or out? Just wondering for future reference. :P

 

Out, of course, I get more coverage that way.

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It makes sense to me that the coldest water would help the louche develop, but how does adding the water slowly help?

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Ooo, yes an experiment. I love experiments and scientific explanations and whatnot. :clap:

 

Edit: If you do a search on "salad dressing" you can find Hiram's previous post on the experiment plus a recipe for what sounds like a kick-ass salad dressing!

Edited by jcbphd

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the following ingredients that are used in absinthe cause the louche: aniseed, star anise, Florence fennel, coriander and surprisingly wormwood. The thickest louche is by star anise of course but I would not say that star anise is a cheap way. The correct ratio per litre should be around 35g of aniseed to 10g star anise. Fennel alone louches very faintly, it only adds to the overall taste. Coriander adds again a bit of spicyness, very similar to that of veronica, whereas wormwood delivers that mintiness. The good louche should be neither transperent nor opaque, an example? Here it is:

post-1144-1167743870_thumb.jpg

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the water is cold for better louche and improves the taste, that is why we do not add warm water to absinthe, though I heard some people did. The anethole is insoluble in water, and then it creates a louche. Interesting example for a louching liqueur containing no anethole is Cointreau, here it is due to sugar syrup and most of all any syrup will louche, either, hovewer, the louche sensu stricte should concern absinthe or pastis et al. Normal louche (nothing extraordinary I mean) is achieved at level more than 400mg/l of anethole, below that the louche is very, very faint, above that level it can be very thick as in les Bleues. The standard set by Pernod fils is 1056mg/l which means 50g of aniseed and 50g of fennel per litre, nowadays this has changed.

Edited by Hiram

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Interesting example for a louching liqueur containing no anethole is Cointreau, here it is due to sugar syrup and most of all any syrup will louche, either, hovewer, the louche sensu stricte should concern absinthe or pastis et al.

Not quite. Sugar is water soluble, and would not cause a louche. The mos that could happen is re-crystallization of the sugar if the solution were cooled enough, reducing it's solute capacity. What louche you might get with Cointreau would be caused by the precipitation of water-insoluble orange oils, which are the primary flavouring component, in much the same manner as anethol is preciptated in absinthe or similar anise liqueurs.

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orange oils of course but do not forget Cointreau is highly sugared whilst absinthe is not and aethole's main property is that it is 70% sweeter than sugar.

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I've seen gin louche before as well.

 

Any alcohol /essential oil mix (made by distillation or other methods) will louche with ice water, given that the oil concentration is high enough.

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yes, exactly what I mean, but time should come to classify absinthe louche as genuine one and others caused by simple chemical reaction as imitations? :D

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the following ingredients that are used in absinthe cause the louche: aniseed, star anise, Florence fennel, coriander and surprisingly wormwood. The thickest louche is by star anise of course but I would not say that star anise is a cheap way. The correct ratio per litre should be around 35g of aniseed to 10g star anise. Fennel alone louches very faintly,

 

A more traditional recipe would go something like 50g green anise 50g ff 25g aa. This produces a very satisfactory louche with no star anise whatsoever.

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Even single malt Scotch cask strength will louche but when people complain about it (who is telling them to dilute such a nobel drink that should consumed only with an addition of the same) they say it becomes cloudy and do not use the word "louche" which should be reserved for absinthe solely and maybe for pastis et al (arak, ouzo...)

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That's silly. What makes one louche genuine and the others false? They're all caused by the same thing: essential oils perspiring out of an alcohol solution. Just because absinthe and pastis are the only liquors that bank on a louche as a desirable trait, that doesn't mean the others are any less authentic.

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You have just quoted Pontarlier recipe and that louche (without star anise) I have posted here some posts above

 

I would not say so. People who produce other liquors taht louche do not even know about it, so their louche is not the historical, traditional louche but an accident and some people who consume these things neat will probably never know they could louche.

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You have just quoted Pontarlier recipe and that louche (without star anise) I have posted here some posts above

 

Swiss Absinthe of Pontarlier

 

For full Bedel text see: 1899 Treatise on Liqueurs

 

Grand Wormwood, dried and stripped 2 kil. 500

Green Anise 5 kilo

Fennel of Florence 5 kilo

Alcohol at 85 degrees 95 litres

 

So what recipe are you quoting? A traditional Pontarlier does not contain star anise. And again louches quite nicely

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Good point, absinthist. We should come up with a word that describes the perspiration of oils out of an alcohol through the addition of water. If only there was a word for that.

Edited by Martin Lake

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So what recipe are you quoting? A traditional Pontarlier does not contain star anise. And again louches quite nicely

 

the Pontarlier is on the photo I have posted and the recipe I am quoting is the other one just to show the good reasonable ratio of star anise to aniseed. Obviously, none of the Suisse absinthes contained star anise, apart from La Parisienne. However, I have found out that recipe of major Dubied calls for 10g of star anise to 50g of aniseed per litre, yet it was abandoned.

 

I hope such a word shall be created, at present I am studying applied linguistics so will look for it :)

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As in English we have darken, blacken or lessen we could use "milken" for anything alcoholic that changes colour and for absinthe, pastis, ouzo, arak, mastika et al will be louche

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However, I have found out that recipe of major Dubied calls for 10g of star anise to 50g of aniseed per litre, yet it was abandoned.

 

Well I am sure it was abandoned because of the way it tasted. A ratio such as that would provide almost instantaneous louche.

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in my personal opinion, star anise can be used but is not so necessary, yes that louche would be very quick as the finished absinthe would measure 1161,6mg/l, so quite a lot as for my taste and probablement for the others

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