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New Jade PF 1901!

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I don't know why they felt the need to mention that it has up to three times the t-bone level while marketing it as a top shelf absinthe. With one fell swoop, they probably alienated both the connoisseurs and the balz-trippers. Ignoring the marketing altogether, I wouldn't mind trying it if it was cheaper. But I am grateful to La Fee for allowing me to feel like a thrifty shopper when I buy the new Jade.

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I saw the price before anything else. That alone was enough to alienate me. Even Jade makes me cuss under my breath as I pull out my debit card but at least I feel like I'm getting my money's worth.

 

Perhaps they just plan to sell it as a high-thujone drink to balz-trippers and let them assume the stupid price is due to the thujone content (and hope their customers don't comparison-shop). Then all claims about its traditional creation and attention to detail might be an attempt to snag a few seasoned absintheurs on the side.

Edited by peridot

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The part that has me scratching my head is Bugnon's and Guy's alleged involvement. Despite Guy's strange opinions on what absinthe should and shouldn't be, his product once was (and maybe still is?) considered good quality. There's no question Bugnon can make excellent absinthe. Why would La Fee make such a half-assed attempt to gain credibility with either camp?

La Fee Parisian was my first absinthe, and I wanted to see La Fee do something good. I guess I had a warm spot since it was my first taste of the green fairy. That warm spot is pretty much gone now.

Maybe next they'll dump a heap of wormwood in the bottom of the bottle and call it K.X.S.

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Aw hell, I fell for the La Fee marketing for my first bottle. I did worse on my second order. This site found me and I really haven't looked back. I felt that if La Fee was not terrible and it was so much better than the Czech stuff, why not try Doubs, it has won medals for goodness sake. I mailed the Doubs away after I had only two drinks. Those drinks were weeks apart. It's all a matter of taste. If I want weeds in my booze, I'd have weeds in my booze. Ok, I know, I'll get down now. Sorry.

 

The 1901 is very nice for me in this stage of my interest. I can be vague if I want. :P

 

:cheers:

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That marketing is responsible for turning many(myself included) on to absinthe. Some keep to that road, and some(like myself) find a deeper interest and eventually the truth. It depends on what the individual does once they decide to pay big bucks for this drink; keep wasting money or taking it upon themselves to dig a little deeper into the drink's history.

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The part that has me scratching my head is Bugnon's and Guy's alleged involvement. Despite Guy's strange opinions on what absinthe should and shouldn't be, his product once was (and maybe still is?) considered good quality.

Depends on who you ask. He makes a perfectly fine product, but it is what it is: very simple, low proof (for absinthe) and inexpensive. Oh, and it consistently ranks high in thujone, and yet makes little fuss about that in marketing.

 

I certainly can't shed any light on who is or isn't involved with the XS, but I do have it on good authority that the distillers are working strictly according to recipes and protocols given to them, not simply re-branding their own products.

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I certainly can't shed any light on who is or isn't involved with the XS, but I do have it on good authority that the distillers are working strictly according to recipes and protocols given to them, not simply re-branding their own products.

It does not justify the high price, Fougerolles is making the VdF and BdF according to LdF's recipes and protocols and they're tagged at £30 and £36 respectively (70cl bottles), Combier is making the Jades according to Ted's recipes and protocols and they're tagged at £55 (75cl bottles).

Now F. Guy is making the XS Française according to La Fée's recipes and protocols and it's tagged at £60 (70cl).

Given Jade reputation and La Fée reputation, there is something wrong here, or La Fée wants to be top dog.

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Excellent points. And yes, it does appear that La Fee wants to be top dog.

 

(now for a very controversial statement...) I think that the La Fée range has the only collection of absinthe that can cater for all types of 'absinthe drinkers' and is the perfect way to educate the uneducated by moving them through the absinthe ranks. The high brand profile in bars means

 

Appears to be a clear attempt at building brand loyalty to a consumer base that will "grow up" with the product. Lots of people here admit to sentimental attachments to first or early experiences with inferior products. But with the learning curve and increase of market choice most here also put a premium on quality to price ratios. Especially since so many of the highest quality products have not been offered commercially. Many people do value brand loyalty over the true market value of a product though, and La Fee seems to be trying to tap into that segment that will stick with a label through the different price tiers offered as their income levels increase, regardless of relative quality. It seems to me to be a strategy which is being ignored by most of the other producers at this time. It may allow them to do an end-run around their less than stellar reputation. Or it could create an even higher hill for them to climb as their reputation is further tarnished by their inability, or unwillingness, to compete in the market as it exists now. At least price-wise at the higher end. How much can they afford to lose on these new lines as they seek to get them positioned against a tide of knowledgable nay-sayers?

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(now for a very controversial statement...) I think that the La Fée range has the only collection of absinthe that can cater for all types of 'absinthe drinkers' and is the perfect way to educate the uneducated by moving them through the absinthe ranks. The high brand profile in bars means

 

My emphasis in bold above.

 

 

The problem for other brands is whether they have access to the same distribution channels as La Fée and various low-end oil mixes. My guess is they don't. So when the distributor's salesperson comes by and talks the bar owner up about new products, they have a chance at a sale. The bar owner probably doesn't care about the extra cost as that is merely passed on to the consumer anyway.

 

And the bar owner really isn't interested in stocking a dozen upscale absinthes. Unfortunately. But that's probably the reality of their clientele. If X•S takes off and folks educate themselves, maybe they'll ask for a Jade or ClB or something else that's good. Then the bar owner will be interested in finding out more about those products. Or maybe he'll just say his distributor doesn't carry it.

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The top dog has to earn that spot.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I was going to say position but that would have opened up a whole new can of worms.

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Thanks to the generosity of a friend, I have a sample of the P.F.01. I find it to have an interesting herbal profile but also to be an unmistakable Jade. Not bad but candly like and, I thought, missing something. A Lolitasinthe -- a sweet thing and a bit of a tease. I also recieved some of the Wormwood blanche. In the interest of science (and at the risk of being roasted for heresy) I have mixed a little of the Wormwood blanche with the PF01 in a glass. about 1 to 3. The result is a thing of beauty and proves that what's missing is an adequate amount of wormwood to balance out the fennel and anise.

Edited by Jaded Prole

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JP, you obviously know what your doing!

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I'm surprised that the Wormwood Blanche did not create more of a stir. I only had a chance to have a sip and to smell the undiluted product, but WOW the wormwood stands out in that one.

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Big time!

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Yes, that wormwood is great! It is a strong drink however and led me to experimenting. I put a little bit is some raki and it became a nice, if simple absinthe. Better than some I've tried. I had thought about the PF01 so I tried it. It was so good with the added Wormwood blanche that I had several. I wouldn't be motivated to buy the PF01 as it is. It's ok but not enough for me to blow my pittance. However, the added wormwood blanche balances out the sweetness and makes it a damn good absinthe, no l'Artisinale but in the zone. I feel Ted is that close to an absinthe that would blow most COs out of the water but it needs a little more of that wormwood to get there.

Edited by Jaded Prole

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I have never considered mixing absinthes a heresy. As long as it is done with care and the intent of creating something better.

I find it a good way to get closer to your own taste. Before just letting a (not so liked) brand be standing at the shelf or in the cupboard, why not try to mix and drink.

There are not only single malts that are drinkable when it comes to whisky and cigars rarely contain just one type of tobacco.

 

Edit: And when I mention cigars, I really mean hand rolled quality cigars. Unnecessary remark probably...

Edited by whizz

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I feel Ted is that close to an absinthe that would blow most COs out of the water but it needs a little more of that wormwood to get there.

He would also need to change his base. There is also the fact that while the 1901 is very well made -- better than any other generally available absinthe -- Ted's skills, although most impressive, are still not at the level of the those of the L'Artisinale artisan.

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Some tend to lose sight of the fact that my skills are, and have been entirely aimed at reproducing specific historical products, created by others well over a century ago, using the very same materials and equipment, while strictly adhering to exacting specific methods used by those same makers, and doing all of this in such a manner that it is entirely practical and repeatable on a full scale (e.g. thousands of liters), despite the significant constraints of modern economics. In short, what I do is strictly bound by historical rules and is intended to fulfill Belle Epoque preferences, nothing else.

 

If/when the time comes that I decide do what others do, and discard those aims and rules for the purpose of creating a single small batch of whatever I like, using whatever methods I see fit (however traditional or non-traditional), that might be a more fitting time to pass judgment as to the extent of my 'skills'.

Edited by tabreaux

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I felt the 1901 was a slight departure from the other Jade products, in my amateur opinion. I liked it very much.

 

If there was any L'Artisinale within 300 miles of my house, I'd make the drive to procure some.

 

The wormwood Blanche was good to me as well but I'll need to drink more for the sake of argument.

 

I have not considered mixing absinthes. As any seasoned absinthe drinker can see from my posts, I'm not well versed in reviewing. Mixing would confuse me and I don't need much help in that area. ;)

 

:cheers:

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This brings up a good point (at least in my head), is there any history out there with documentation of preferred "mixing" techniques or discoveries?

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I felt the 1901 was a slight departure from the other Jade products, in my amateur opinion. I liked it very much.

 

If there was any L'Artisinale within 300 miles of my house, I'd make the drive to procure some.

 

The wormwood Blanche was good to me as well but I'll need to drink more for the sake of argument.

 

There are elements in all three that I like and/or find interesting in one way or another. I also enjoyed tasting the 1797 and Duplais. Never before has so much quality and variety been available, and that is good for everyone.

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That about sums it up for me, as well.

 

As with finely crafted beer, when libations have reached the level of artistry of those mentioned above, I find that a particular mood is the main determining factor of my choosing, rather than the quality level of the drink.

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I enjoyed the 1797 as well. I agree with all the above. My moods dictate the nights beverage.

 

All the new offerings were very nice for me but the timing was a bit close for my wallet.

 

My new Christmas colors, Verte and Blanche. I've been a very good boy this year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I may be a bit biased. ;)

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