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#1 MerdeVerte

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Posted 24 September 2006 - 10:01 PM

Anyone ever read this one? I just ordered it.

http://www.amazon.co...1252878?ie=UTF8

From one of the reviews:
"It's hero, Des Esseintes, is basted on Absinthe (or hashish) half the time and his life is one prolongued hallucination. The author takes the reader so intricately into the main character's life, that we are living alongside him, absorbed in his decadence. We are invited to his parties (which rival Trimalchio's), are absorbed in his fantasies (which rival Fellini's) and basically are tripping with him in his unique and solipsistic universe. Oscar Wilde described this as the strangest work of fiction he had ever come across."
"Is it true that the people of Paris are always laughing?"

"Yes, but it is with anger in their hearts. They express all their complaints with loud bursts of laughter, and commit the most detestable crimes with a smile on their faces."

#2 Stomp Brockmore

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Posted 25 September 2006 - 07:46 AM

Haven't read it, but it sounds fascinating. I'll probably have to pick up a copy myself. Thanks for the tip!

#3 TheGreenOne

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 08:07 AM

basted on Absinthe (or hashish) half the time and his life is one prolongued hallucination.

What does absinthe have to do with hashish or hallucinations?

#4 Guillaume Lanfray

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 08:23 AM

Ask Verlaine & Rimbaud.

Edited by Guillaume Lanfray, 13 October 2006 - 08:28 AM.


#5 Ari (Eric Litton)

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 08:24 AM

Well I'm sure it will play the absinthe=hallucination angle, although alcohol itself is a pretty potent world fogger and hallucinogen if abused.

Edited by Ari, 13 October 2006 - 08:26 AM.

"Oscar Wilde once traveled to an all-cat dimension and appeared on the Late-Late Show with Catman O'Brien."

#6 AlyssaDyane

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 09:01 AM

I just read the review on this book. Sounds like a good read. Let us know, will ya? Maybe it would be a good candidate for my book club.
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#7 Pan Buh

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 02:38 PM

alcohol itself is a pretty potent world fogger and hallucinogen if abused.

Hallucinogen, no.

#8 Ari (Eric Litton)

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Posted 13 October 2006 - 03:35 PM

I should have said a cause of hallucinations and not a hallucinogen. However alcohol abuse can do all sorts of odd things. Also about 25-33% (can't remember the exact number) of those going through serious alcohol withdrawals will experience hallucinations.

(Which all makes sense when you look at most vintage first hand accounts of absinthe hallucinations come from alcohol abusers or those that constantly dealt with them.)
"Oscar Wilde once traveled to an all-cat dimension and appeared on the Late-Late Show with Catman O'Brien."

#9 MerdeVerte

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Posted 10 February 2007 - 02:34 PM

I finally got around to reading the book last week. There isn't any mention of absinthe or hashish in it. The rotten asshole of a reviewer must have been fucking around. I enjoyed it nonetheless. As much as I like it though, I wouldn't recommend it to anyone. I don't think many others would find the main character as fascinating as I did. I have a penchant for antiheroes. I don't know... I suppose if you have the patience to read through pages, and pages, and pages of tedious, mind-numbing description/symbolism just to get to the very little bits that are more interesting, you should check it out. Oh, not much plot to speak of either.
"Is it true that the people of Paris are always laughing?"

"Yes, but it is with anger in their hearts. They express all their complaints with loud bursts of laughter, and commit the most detestable crimes with a smile on their faces."

#10 jcbphd

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Posted 10 February 2007 - 08:46 PM

However alcohol abuse can do all sorts of odd things. Also about 25-33% (can't remember the exact number) of those going through serious alcohol withdrawals will experience hallucinations.


A very small percentage of people who abuse alcohol experience alcohol-induced hallucinations or psychotic episodes. There is also delirium tremens, which includes withdrawal-induced hallucinations, and occurs in about 5% of alcoholics.
Temperance, like chastity, is its own punishment. ~Four Vines "The Peasant"

Ça descend la gorge comme le bébé Jésus en culottes de velours.

You may be deceived if you trust too much, but you will live in torment if you do not trust enough. ~Frank Crane

#11 Jaded Prole

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Posted 11 February 2007 - 12:40 PM

Then DT's occur in chronic alcoholics at a certain stage but only in the absence of booze. Ususally 2 to 5 days into withdrawl. It isn't pretty.

#12 Boggy

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Posted 11 February 2007 - 12:59 PM

FYI,
Sudden withdrawal from alcohol does not precipitate the syndrome.
Characteristics: aversion to food with irritability and sleeplessness. Deficiency of vitamin B plays a role in anorexia, nausea and such. Hallucinations, when occur, are of fantastic moving animals, different size and very colourful - that's why we refer to pink elephants or white mice.
The psychosis lasts from 2 to 10 days and frequently terminates in a profound sleep.
Delirium tremens can occur after 3 or 4 years of chronic alcoholism.
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#13 Jaded Prole

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Posted 11 February 2007 - 01:25 PM

Yes, that's what I said, 2 - 5 days into withdrawls. However, I have seen people begin DT's sooner. Usually they also have, in addition to frightening hallucinations of bugs, animals, and monsters, tactile hallucinations as well (bugs crawling on them are the norm). People who are at the stage of alcoholism where DT's occur ususally also have seizures as well but that happens before the DT's set in.

This is the stuff that was blamed on "absinthism" but none of the people I've seen go through it ( more than a few in the line of work) ever drank absinthe.

#14 Boggy

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Posted 11 February 2007 - 01:41 PM

Auditory and olfactory hallucinations can occur as well if not so frequently.
And we should mention proposterous confabulations and disorientation in time and place, too.
I think it depends on where the alcoholic is coming from, take Poland, for instance :)
At least, it has cleared out that absinthism was fiction, even if I am absinthist :cheers:
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#15 Jaded Prole

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Posted 11 February 2007 - 02:09 PM

You refering to Warniki's syndrome? Hey didn't we discuss that in a bar in Toloune?!


As an Absinthist myself, I've done extensive research to disprove absinthism! :drunk:


In the interest of science of course.

#16 Boggy

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Posted 11 February 2007 - 02:35 PM

Yes, that is right, Wernicke and Korsakoff syndrome as they are related. Have not been to Toloune yet :cheers: or do not remember :drunk: we must have researched too much. Still, in the name of science :)
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#17 jcbphd

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Posted 11 February 2007 - 06:59 PM

There is an interesting case study on Korsakoff's syndrome in Oliver Sachs' story, The Lost Mariner, in his collection, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat. I would actually recommend the entire book. It's a fascinating read.
Temperance, like chastity, is its own punishment. ~Four Vines "The Peasant"

Ça descend la gorge comme le bébé Jésus en culottes de velours.

You may be deceived if you trust too much, but you will live in torment if you do not trust enough. ~Frank Crane

#18 Boggy

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Posted 14 February 2007 - 09:44 AM

Thanks Doc :cheers: This one here is quite informative http://www.emedicine...d/topic2405.htm
Surviving the attacks of mentally-deficient creatures of the dark and carrying on (since 1999).
 
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