Jump to content
JosephMory

Searching to find the green fairy

Recommended Posts

BS"D

 

Hiram: Yes, we also have a prohibition to drink grain base alcohol on Passover. So we are reduced to kosher for passover wine, a grape based vodka (disgusting!) and if you are lucky to get it, a kosher for passover potato vodka. Anyway, Passover is not a holiday to do a lot of drinking...we have plenty of others during the year ;-)

 

 

TheGreenOne: Thanks for the tips! I'll check it out. To be able to get kosher supervision for absinthe, you would have to have a kosher supervision agency willing to do it, and the absinthe producer willing to abide by the kosher rules. Also, there would have to be a pretty big demand amongst jews of absinthe to get everybody involved to do it...that's why I'm thinking of getting a grain based absinthe, without the need of any kosher supervison.

 

Dr. Verte: That might be a strong possibility, because she asked my aunt to prepare it when she was not feeling well and she was aching (she fell down about a million times); anyway, when I get the chance I'll ask my aunt and keep everybody posted.

 

TrainerAZ: Of course the arak was made from grapes, but it had kosher supervision...its very easy to get kosher arak.

 

Hiram: Which of the selections everybody has posted you think I should try first?

- Duplais won a gold medal

- F. Guy has won golden spoons in the Absinthiades

- Lemercier sounds also good.

 

But what do I know? The thing is, since it's the first time I'll try it, I want to set my bar high. Hope to hear from you soon!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Of those three, I personally would go with the Duplais.

 

I like F. Guy myself, but the community is divided on it. Many of us like it, many of us think it smells like sweaty gym socks. We've pretty much narrowed that down to genetic differences in taste and smell.

 

My current top picks (there are a number of new absinthes I've not tried) would be the Jade Edouard and the Combier Blanchette, which is not a Jade product, but formulated by Ted Breaux, and distilled by the Combier folks. Blanchette is not a typical blanche, but has a great wormwood profile.

 

After that it would be one of the Bugnon "Clandestine" La Bleues.

 

Lemercier Amer is adequate and drinkable, but not really what I would consider a representative absinthe.

 

Mind you, this is according to my tastes, your findings may vary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Duplais is made with a grain base, per Markus' decision in keeping the price moderate, and it is pretty damn good. It is also only available in a half litre so you won't break the bank to give it a try.

Edited by elfnmagik

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Greetings from a fellow New Yorker (working in Montreal through the end of December)! :cheers:

 

What say we hook up for a sampling session when I return?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Greetings from a fellow New Yorker (working in Montreal through the end of December)! :cheers:

 

What say we hook up for a sampling session when I return?

 

Honored indeed, Joseph! There are very few people I'd choose to have a first Green Hour with than Gentleman Brooks. I am sincerely envious.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
My current top picks (there are a number of new absinthes I've not tried) would be the Jade Edouard and the Combier Blanchette, which is not a Jade product, but formulated by Ted Breaux, and distilled by the Combier folks. Blanchette is not a typical blanche, but has a great wormwood profile.

Nice TedAd in a thread explicitly devoted to non-grape based absinthes.

 

Just to be clear, although Blanchette is not a Jade product nor a typical blanche, it is to the best of my knowledge, made with a grape spirit.

Edited by TheGreenOne

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There are very few people I'd choose to have a first Green Hour with than Gentleman Brooks.
Thanks, T73. :)

 

Izzat you in your avatar, btw? Wish I had more hair where it counts.

Edited by Brooks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hiram: Which of the selections everybody has posted you think I should try first?

- Duplais won a gold medal

- F. Guy has won golden spoons in the Absinthiades

- Lemercier sounds also good.

Of those, I'd go for the Duplais. Hands down, no contest. I'm one of those who like F. Guy for the simple drink it is, but Duplais is far superior. On the other hand, if you can afford both, go for it and have something for comparison.

 

Don't get too impressed by the golden spoon award from the Absinthiades - it means little more than it is a decent drink who wouldn't challenge the palate of a seasoned pastis-drinker too much.

 

Lemercier is, well, OK if you happen to come across it and there is nothing else to drink. I just don't see any reason to order it, pay for shipping etc. when you can get Duplais.

 

L'chaim! :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Izzat you in your avatar, btw? Wish I had more hair where it counts.

 

It is indeed me, Brooks. Makes you question why Maggie hangs out with the likes of me, eh? ;) I'd gladly trade a few of those hairs for a few more brains.

 

We'll look forward to a review from both the teacher and the pupil when you guys finally share that drink. :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You look like a noble Injun, T73. Do you have Injun blood? Whatever....it's a great look.

 

"No brain, no pain," they say, and well I believe it. I have just enough brains to make myself crazy, but not enough brains to make myself rich.

Edited by Brooks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Brooks, you're crazy like a fox.

 

And does it follow from your self-analysis that being rich would be more painful than being crazy?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Greetings from a fellow New Yorker (working in Montreal through the end of December)! :cheers:

 

What say we hook up for a sampling session when I return?

 

Hello Brooks,

 

I'm sure we can work something out as soon as you come to NY. Mind you, I live in Far Rockaway, not in Manhattan.

 

BS"D

 

What do you all think of Doubs? Is it made from grain alcohol? Is it worth the try?

Sorry if it seems that I want you guys to do my homework for me, but I am kind of an ignoramus when it comes to absinthe and since many of you are well seasoned absinthe drinkers, I am willing to humble myself to become your pupil. Maybe with time I can become a master too :P

 

Anyway, let me know.

 

Regards,

 

Welcome and :cheers:

 

I believe you will find a couple of excellent choices made from beet sugar. I think Sixer suggested one our favorites, CLB, was beet sugar based. Perhaps one of our own good Doctors can confirm that?

 

NYC?!!! Do you know my good friend Dave?

 

 

Hi Theatre73! By CLB you mean Clandestine Blanche? Pardon my ignorance, but when you list the absinthes in an abbreviated manner, I'm kind of :blink:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
And does it follow from your self-analysis that being rich would be more painful than being crazy?
Good point, PB. I didn't really follow that thought through. Crazy is assuredly no picnic. Rich, on the other hand....!

 

I don't see how being rich could be anything but a step in the right direction, particularly at my age. What, it's gonna rob me of ambition I don't have?

 

Joseph, Far Rockaway is a fur piece, but we'll see. (What's BS"D, btw?)

 

We had a bottle of Doubs at LautrecFest. It's nothing I'd buy for myself, but I've certainly had worse.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Doubs is an artificially colored oil-mix and the worst non-Czech absinth I've ever had. Quotes from the person who ended up taking the bottle of Doubs home from LautrecFest.

 

Carry on...4 those who don't know, I took home the Doubs from ThujoneTest. I asked for it... I drank a couple of glasses(somehow) the following week and ended up feeling like crap the next day.

 

It's just that Lautrcfest left a bad taste in my mouth. Oh wait, that was the Doubs...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello and welcome.

 

That bottle should now be in the hands of someone crafty in the Pacific NW. It was nice to have, onacuz it made me appreciate distilled absinthe tenfold. Even my UnEmile tastes good now(although that is not an endorsment).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
(What's BS"D, btw?)

Think of it as a digital yarmulkah.

 

Hi Theatre73! By CLB you mean Clandestine Blanche? Pardon my ignorance, but when you list the absinthes in an abbreviated manner, I'm kind of :blink:
Clandestine La Bleue, in this case. It's actually the brand name. There's a list of acronymse here. Sometimes we use them, sometimes we don't. Depends on whether the poster is lazy or in a hurry.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

BS"D

 

Hiram. are you jewish? Or are you acquainted with a jewish crowd? You seem to know a lot of insider information ;)

 

BS"D it's an acronym that basically means "with the help of Heaven" It's a constant reminder that everything you do is guided from above.

 

Thanks for the tips on Doubs....I guess marketing can tip the scales if you don't know better.

 

Joseph, Far Rockaway is a fur piece, but we'll see. (What's BS"D, btw?)

 

We had a bottle of Doubs at LautrecFest. It's nothing I'd buy for myself, but I've certainly had worse.

 

 

I didn't mean you would have to shlepp yourself all the way to Far Rockaway, I meant that it's going to take some serious coordinating to get this done, but I'm more than happy to go for it.

Edited by JosephMory

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you're interested in information about the history of jews and absinthe, you may want to see the following page on Oxy's Virtual Absinthe Museum. If would like additional information, ask Oxygenee -- he's one of the best sources of information for anything related to the history of absinthe. He is a member of the WS and all the other major absinthe forums including his own La Fee Verte or you could reach him via email from the Virtual Museum.

 

Interesting stuff and it does not surprise me that jews had to do with the production of absinthe. It helps me a lot on my quest of finding an adequate absinthe for me, since if grape products are made by jews then I think they don't need kosher supervision, but I would have to check with my rabbi on that.

 

Anyway, I think I'm going to go ahead and order me a Duplais and a Clandestine LaBlue. What do you guys think?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You look like a noble Injun, T73. Do you have Injun blood? Whatever....it's a great look.

While there are rumours of a few drops of Quapaw, it's only contributing to the whole Heintz 57. Less noble and more a feeble attempt to express a personal philosophy, I fear.

 

 

There's a list of acronyms here. Sometimes we use them, sometimes we don't. Depends on whether the poster is lazy or in a hurry.

In my case, lazy. Or maybe a friendly nickname like, T73. :)

 

Joseph, the Clandestine La Bleue ;) and the Duplais are excellent choices.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with your choices JosephMory. Actually it's about time to order more, I find they are getting past the comfort level.

 

:cheers: (if that's ok)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This thread gets me back to thinking that Slivovitz could be used as a base for absinthe, depending of course on the quality of the Slivovitz, I like the Navip and for a while I was getting some fine HG from the Serbian exile community.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This thread gets me back to thinking that Slivovitz could be used as a base for absinthe

From Hartsmar's site:

Suisse La Bleue/Verte - Plum Base

Switzerland, 65% alc. vol. (130 proof), 0.30 liter

From Val de Travers in Switzerland comes this clandestine absinthe. All thanks to Simon Pedersen, I got the chance to sample this one. It dates back to around 2000 so it has had time to settle in and age very well.

 

So what's the deal on this one? Why bother reviewing another clandestine Suisse La Bleue? Well, this isn't an ordinary La Bleue by far. First of all, this is a verte. Second it tastes like nothing I've had before. The very heavy sediments on the bottom of the bottle told me this would be very heavy in taste, and it is. It's got a really special herbal sort of spicyness to it. I can't quite explain it, but it's very interesting.

 

So, opening the bottle and the first thing I notice is the very obvious smell of... plum! Plum mixed with a lot of herbs, mainly wormwood and also a very slight hint of anise and what I believe might be hyssop. Tasting it neat is actually a very pleasant suprise. It's good. Considering the first smell of it, that was a huge surprise.

 

Adding water to it produces a nice light green louche and its intense smell mellows and spreads in the room. The taste is ofcourse a bit smoother now, but still very heavy. It's not really complex, just intense and heavy. Some how it does appeal to me, and I do like it. The plum base adds a very interesting texture to the drink and as I said, I've never tasted anything like it before.

Edited by TheGreenOne

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hiram. are you jewish? Or are you acquainted with a jewish crowd? You seem to know a lot of insider information.
No, I'm not, but I grew up in an area with a large jewish population (Cincinnati) and went to school with a lot of jewish kids. While I don't personally embrace the doctrine, I have a fondness for the culture. And jewish girls... well, what's not to like? ;)

 

Oh, and the food. I can't get a good Reuben in Seattle to save my life. Bagels? Forget about it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Welcome!

:cheers:

 

do try the Duplais

though it will make you appreciate the higher-end, the Amer might make a good "house-absinthe" cost and quality-wise.

 

enjoy, Joseph

laf

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, indeed. I'm familiar with the disputed history—at least as cloudy as that of the Martini or the first use of the word "cocktail."*

 

 

 

 

 

 

*We know when it first appeared in print, but not where it originated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ah, the reuben. I went vegetarian earlier this year, and there's not many food items I miss, but I do miss a good reuben from time to time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please sign in to comment

You will be able to leave a comment after signing in



Sign In Now

×