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TheGreenOne

Absinthe Industriel

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An artisnal oil-mix. Although I had been aware that there were pre-ban oil-mixes, I never gave them much thought.

 

Although the Industriel is a queer shade of aqua, it is quality absinthe. I should have used a bit of sugar but that is my fault. AI has completly changed by views of an oil mix's potential.

 

The Industriel would not be mistaken for a distilled absinthe but, far more significantly, it could never be confused with Doubs or a modern CO oil-mix.

 

Among modern absinthes, Absinthe Industriel is sui generis.

 

AI demonstrates the signficant potential for oil-mixes.

 

I am reluctant to mention AI at all since it could give rise to foolish experiments.

 

AI is the work of a Master. Amateurs should steer clear.

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Alcohol percentage of between 45% and 75%, give or take a few degrees.

While many different herbs can be used in the blend, artemesia absinthium and anise must always be included, and in quantities sufficient to be discernible in the final product.

Absinthe may be produced by the direct or indirect distillation of herbs in alcohol and water, or by the addition of herbal essences (themselves produced by distillation) to base alcohol, but not by pure maceration without distillation.

Absinthe should, with the rarest of exceptions, be clear, or green. The green colour may be produced by any legal means whatsover.

 

I want to try it.

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I'll stick with being a consumer. There are a few things I can do but chemistry isn't on the list.

 

Craftsmen/artisans are certainly appreciated.

 

Good luck!

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Oil mixes aren't chemistry. Want to try it?

 

• Go to the liquor store and buy a bottle of cheap vodka.

 

• Go to the grocery store and buy a bottle of anise extract.

 

• Add anise extract to vodka to taste.

 

Voilá! Oil mix ouzo! Just like most of the ones back at the liquor store.

 

Now, do that with wormwood and mint extracts (and other weird and nameless flavors), color with food coloring, and you've got Czechsinth.

 

The problem with most oil mix absinth(e)s is that their made with crappy oils and usually by people who don't know or care what absinthe is actually supposed to taste like.

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Probably as a personal challenge and to prove that oil mixes don't have to be nasty.

 

Sounds reasonable. Occasionally, I still enjoy a glass of Lasala although I'm still not sure which category it belongs in.

 

Actually, my "Why?" was unclearly directed to Trainer's "No." I wish I could write a bit more lucidly. Sorry.

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Lasala is an oil mix, according to the label of the bottles found around here - it says directly (in french) that it is made from "the best of essential oils".

 

Had a glass in a bar, when I was in Berlin some weeks ago. I enjoyed it for what it was - a drink in a cosy place in the company of good friends. Perfectly OK for such an occasion.

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Yes.

 

 

 

 

Or, in more detail, historical absinthes include both distilled products and oil mixes. Being an oil mix does not mean it's not an absinthe, it just means it's a different grade of absinthe.

 

 

QUOTE(Hiram @ Nov 27 2005, 08:14 PM)... there is no "official" definition anywhere yet.

 

This may be a good time to revisit some of the traditional distinctions as given us by the old distiller's manuals: ordinaire, semi-fine, fine, extra-fine, suisse, etc.

 

According to both Duplais and Fritsch, an absinthe ordinaire would be low-proof with fairly low herb content and according to Duplais, needn't contain fennel. Fritsch specifies Florence fennel for suisse absinthes only, the others simply getting "fennel." De Brevans gives a demi-fine absinthe with no fennel, and sometimes specifies sweet fennel (Foeniculum vulgare var. dulce) as opposed to Florence fennel (Foeniculam vulgare var. azoricum), as does Duplais.

 

The increase in rank from ordinaire to extra-fine is generally accompanied by an increasing volume and variety of herbs, as well as greater alcoholic strength. All of these, according to Duplais, may or may not be oil mixes and may or may not be artificially colored.

 

What has set the standard to which we expect an absinthe to aspire, and about which we argue infinitely, is the absinthe suisse. I find no account where an absinthe suisse lacks grand and petite wormwood, anise and Florence fennel.

 

Just [absinthe] for thought.

 

This means that Absinthe Industriel, being a complex artisanal oil mix, would qualify as a fine or extra-fine absinthe. Less-complex oil mixes (AND distilled products) would qualify as fine, semi-fine, or ordinaire absinthes. The most complex and balanced distilled absinthes would be absinthes suisse.

 

These rankings are, of course, based on the recipe. I doubt contemporary distillers will be publishing their recipes publicly, which makes completely objective recipe-and-process rankings more difficult.

 

Macerates like KOS would not qualify as any of these and therefore, by historical definitions, are not absinthe.

 

BTW, is AI going into production somewhere, or is it just being used as a case study?

 

 

Hey, maybe the classification of Absinthe Ordinaire can be re-qualified to reference Dr. Ordinaire and include the descriptors, "extra bitter and medicinal." I imagine Czechsinthers would be happy for the association.

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Lasala is an oil mix, according to the label of the bottles found around here - it says directly (in french) that it is made from "the best of essential oils".

 

Had a glass in a bar, when I was in Berlin some weeks ago. I enjoyed it for what it was - a drink in a cosy place in the company of good friends. Perfectly OK for such an occasion.

I had my first glass of the LaSalla two nights ago, out on the town with friends. I wouldn't buy a bottle, but as Gertz says, perfectly enjoyable as a drink when you're just out having a good time. Almost any absinthe works for me in that context. It's only at home, in an absinthe-tasting environment, that I get too picky to drink the mediocre stuff.

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Something is quite wrong, everyone is agreeing.

 

For those in the know, how were the oils procured? Through trial and error of commercially produced essential oils or through a home made steam distillation contraption (would it still be called a still?)? why am I ending all my sentences with question marks? Will underdog be able to escape the dastardly doc duo or is this the end? Tune in next time?

 

 

Lasalla's price makes it good for a mixer or 'filler' absinthe for a non WS event style party.

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Something is quite wrong, everyone is agreeing.

 

For those in the know, how were the oils procured? Through trial and error of commercially produced essential oils or through a home made steam distillation contraption (would it still be called a still?)? why am I ending all my sentences with question marks? Will underdog be able to escape the dastardly doc duo or is this the end? Tune in next time?

 

 

Lasalla's price makes it good for a mixer or 'filler' absinthe for a non WS event style party.

Yes, terrible the we're agreeing. Maybe we're all just tired after our efforts in the "Pernod Recommendation?". It would also be that I spent most of the day reading all the english translations of the distiller's manuals. More on that later (no I'm not going to ask how to become an HG'ess)

 

My only thought would be that Hiram said extract not essential oils. The latter are very dangerous to take internally. They all say not for internal consumption. Otherwise we'll all be waving bye at Ari. :wave2: Since we'll miss you, we don't want that to happen.

 

OK, this is about as good as my brain can handle right now.(Oh, can I not type correctly today.) More absinthe.

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Some essential oils are more dangerous than others. Anise oil is not particularly dangerous. Wormwood oil on the other hand is a toxin to avoid in any amount. I think the "oil mixes" are generally a combination of oils, extracts and, in some cases, maceration.

 

I prefer to imbibe properly made distilled absinthe -- why bother with the trash?

 

Though I must say that TGO says something is good, I trust his tastes and judgement.

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Some essential oils are more dangerous than others. Anise oil is not particularly dangerous. Wormwood oil on the other hand is a toxin to avoid in any amount. I think the "oil mixes" are generally a combination of oils, extracts and, in some cases, maceration.

 

I prefer to imbibe properly made distilled absinthe -- why bother with the trash?

 

Though I must say that TGO says something is good, I trust his tastes and judgement.

A lot will also depend on the quality of the essential oils. Brands vary. Some are better than others, and the better ones more concentrated. All of the aromatherapy applications I've used involving essential oils are either inhaled or applied to the body. Never ingested. So I was taking my cue from there. Forgive me if I spoke incorrectly.

 

My experience in absinthes is limited, so clearly I'd defer to TGO's judgment in such matters.

 

Essential oils are produced by distillation, yes with a still. On the web you can find copper alembics being sold for the purposes of making essential oils and extracts. I've never done this myself. But you don't need a very big operation. You're only looking to produce a fluid ounce of oil, which for most people is a lot. The CO I have is all in 2 dram bottles which is 1/4 ounce. A little goes a long way as they say.

 

Someone please correct me if I'm wrong, but from what I gather that such a small home operation for producing essential oils you wouldn't need a steam based system. But I haven't done this, so I could very well be the source of erroneous information.

 

Sounds interesting. If anything it proves there is no excuse for producing a shitty product.

Right on!

 

In reading the various distillers manuals (well the English translations you can get for free over at Oxy's site) they often list recipes using essences (oil-mixes in our parlance is my presumption). Different ones for absinthe ordinaire, absinthe semi-fine, absinthe fine. But they say they're clearly not as good as the distilled products and often made only for the "city" market. IE lots of poorer folk unable to afford the better stuff. Perhaps the blight on grapes limiting wine production was also a factor. The working classes needed to drink something, didn't they?

 

I'm sure the good Doctor's of absinthe and others of knowledge and wisdom will correct me. (That is not intended to be sarcasm nor witty.)

 

Oh, :wave2: Ari.

Edited by dakini_painter

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For liquor puposes, "essential oil" and "essence" have the same meaning. In the old distiller's parlance, essence is the oil you get from steam distillation of individual herb masses. One problem with using essences is that the temperature used to distill them is often higher than what is desired in a good absinthe (or other compound liquors). Quality liquor manufacturers avoid using essences because they can be entrained with empyreumatic flavors as a result of the higher temperatures used to distill the oils (think of the smell/off flavor you get when you overcook potatoes or vegetables in a pressure cooker). Another problem is that by using only water (steam directly in the herbmass charge) you are missing out on some of the more delicate herbal flavors that only come over as a result of macerating in alcohol and then distilling the charge.

BTW, is this the same Absinthe Industriel that was making the rounds at the last Left Coast Louchefest? If not, then somebody has absconded with that moniker for their version of a homemade oil mix absinthe.

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BTW, is this the same Absinthe Industriel that was making the rounds at the last Left Coast Louchefest? If not, then somebody has absconded with that moniker for their version of a homemade oil mix absinthe.

The sample arrived from the PNW. Althought I cannot vouch that it was the same as the Absinthe Industriel at LCLF, I would suspect that there are very few artisans with the knowledge and ability to produce an oil mix of this quality.

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When last I saw AI, it was most definitely green . . . very very green . . . rather than aqua, but I do believe that was LCLF05. I expect that particular bottle no longer exists, and the formula has been tweaked if indeed it is produced by the same artisan.

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There was an experimental blanche made from essential oils that we tasted on the train to Pontarlier. I remember it tasting quite good. I think that trying to make a consistant product this way would have its own set of problems though.

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