Jump to content
TheGreenOne

Artemesia Canariensis

Recommended Posts

Canary Wormwood - a very useful herb

 

Canary Wormwood  (Artemesia canariensis), or Incienso, as it is called in Spanish, is a very common and useful herb found growing wild on waste ground, abandoned fields and roadsides on all the islands of the archipelago.

 

It has grey-green ferny foliage and small yellow button flower heads and a very powerful and stimulating aroma if lightly crushed. The ashes of the plant mixed in oil and applied to the head are said to help cause new hair growth.

Canary Wormwood, prepared as an infusion of leaves and flowers, is a treatment for digestive disorders, as a tonic and as a stimulating drink to help ward off depression. The leaves can be used externally as a poultice to be applied to bruises, sprains and swellings.

 

Canary Wormwood also has antiseptic and antiparasitic properties due to the coumarins it contains.

 

Canary wormwood can also be used as an insecticide and as a vermifuge for expelling internal worms. Dried foliage and flowers can be added to give additional scent to pot-pourri and to stuff herbal pillows to help encourage sleep and ward of insect pests like fleas, mosquitoes and moths.

 

Its close relative  Wormwood (Artemesia absinthium) is the main herb used to make the potent spirit absinthe. Canary Wormwood also contains thujone, which is the active ingredient, besides  alcohol, said to give the drink its kick.

 

The herb Tarragon, so often used for culinary purposes, is Artemesia dracunculus and the medicinal herb Mugwort is Artemesia vulgaris.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

He has been a bit elusive as of late, don't ya think? :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That was a nice piece of information, I was happy to learn about it.

 

I have dreams of retiring to the Canary Islands, myself.

 

They make a distinctive knife, and there are bars there where you can get squid/octopus broiled directly on the galvanised bartop, the barkeep drops the mollusc on the bartop, pours grain alcohol over it, and lights it.

 

My kind of place! :yahoo:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We stayed on the northern side of Tenerife back in the late 90's. GREAT place. Lots of wonderful natural parks, including a volcanic park that makes you think you're walking on the surface of mars. The seafood is the best I've had anywhere.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have dreams of retiring to the Canary Islands, myself.

They make a distinctive knife, and there are bars there where you can get squid/octopus broiled directly on the galvanised bartop, the barkeep drops the mollusc on the bartop, pours grain alcohol over it, and lights it.

My kind of place! :yahoo:

 

Here! Here! Delicious stuff! :cheers:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would not touch anything cooked on a galvanized surface. :puke:

 

Now a young polpo properly beaten and marinated is one of my favorite appetizers in Italy. Likewise the infant octopus - moscardini sauteed whole in garlic, white wine, olive oil with a pinch of parsley at the end has me not missing dinner. :thumbup:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
...and there are bars there where you can get squid/octopus broiled directly on the galvanised bartop, the barkeep drops the mollusc on the bartop, pours grain alcohol over it, and lights it.
Is that the Czech mollusc broiling ritual? :harhar:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...and there are bars there where you can get squid/octopus broiled directly on the galvanised bartop, the barkeep drops the mollusc on the bartop, pours grain alcohol over it, and lights it.

Is that the Czech mollusc broiling ritual? :harhar:

 

 

Yah, it's looked down on by the cognoscenti who favor the more authentic ritual of the Azores, which I understand involves running puréed octopus through a drip device into a stockpot of boiling oil below, where the liquified mollusc instantly congeals, the ink forming what is known to experts as the louche, which when fully developed is the signal that the meal is ready to eat.

 

Some followers of the Azore ritual add sugar to the puréed octopus drip, saying that it develops the flavor more; others forego sugar, wanting only the taste of the undiluted mollusc...... :twitchsmile:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hmm. Not appetizing to read the process, that's for sure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Czech mollusces (with the "e") do not louche. Carmelized sugar is required for the appropriate flavor. Unless you do them as raw shooters. The effect is overwhelming. :devil:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×