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Bladeswitch

Hello everyone!

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I am a professional Chef who loves culinary history, well when I discovered absinthe 6 years ago when doing reasearch on Oyster's Rockefeller I was hell bent on trying an ingredient that was out of my reach. Well I have tasted very few and would like to learn more about this mystical aperitif. Thanks in advance!

 

 

Bladeswitch

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Well I've actually taken a year off to write and publish my cookbook then I plan to open a small fine dining restaurant in the my little home town that I just recently moved back to. So good to Be home!

 

 

Your Friend,

 

Bladeswitch

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Thank you for the link to the recipes! The Oyster recipe on that link was the first one I found and started me on my way to a incurable obsession with the "Green Fairy". Thanks everyone again for the warm welcome!

 

 

 

 

Bladeswitch

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Howdy, Blade. :cheers: What Hiram said about punctuation and whatnot is very true. I'm not much of a stickler for grammar, but that intro made my copy editor sense tingle.

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Welcome to the fold! :cheers:

 

In a recipe like Oysters Rockefeller — which calls for a whopping ¼ cup of absinthe! — your choice of absinthe must affect the flavor of the finished dish.

 

Have you had the opportunity to experiment with different brands? Have you reached any conclusions? (I'm still looking for ways to polish off this old bottle of La Fée!)

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I found that the amount of absinthe in that particular recipe is actually perfect. The reason why is the use of dairy particularly butter, when butter is added to any ingredient that is anise based the flavor structure changes to something different all its own. I highly recommend the original recipe! Now the original recipe that I have researched states that "Antoine" used the Pernod brand of absinthe I would concur and please don't use any czech absinthe no oyster deserve that horrible a death.

 

 

Bladeswitch

 

 

 

*Note flavor structure is not a scientific term it is my own palates observation.

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No New Orleanian would ever fault a recipe for containing too much booze! (N.O. is my home town.)

 

I haven't had the Pernod absinthe, but I imagine it's fairly straightforword and anise-y. (A safer bet for Oysters Rockefeller than the Montmarte, in other words. Kübler could probably sub for the Pernod.)

 

A favorite lunch of mine used to be a dozen oysters — four each of the Big Three: Rockefeller, Bienville, and Roffignac. Your Rockefeller recipe looks great. Here are recipes for the other two:

 

Oysters Bienville (Emeril's recipe)

Oysters Roffignac (Brennan's recipe — scroll down page)

 

The drill: You kick off with a sazerac, have a glass or two of wine with with the oysters, and end with bread pudding with whiskey sauce, followed by expresso or Café Brûlot. .A nap afterwards is pleasant, and insures that you're lying down when the heart attack hits.

.

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Wonderful recipes I have them but thank you! I'm planning to make an absinthe granita (Water ice) for summer. The recipe is coming along nicely.

 

 

 

 

Bladeswitch

 

 

P.S. Brooks If you would like to know more about the granita please contact me personally, I don't like to put original recipes up on forums.

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I just edited my introductory post sorry I forget to use my basic writing skills when I become excited about a subject.

 

There's still the matter of punctuation. Get a copy of "Eats, Shoots & Leaves" for your next birthday, especially if you write books.

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