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TheGreenOne

Duplais Barrique

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Pale straw color, not yellowish like the Blanchette. The oak adds an interesting note. Probably not going to become a favorite of too many, but worth trying by those interested in how wood aging affects absinthe.

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Perhaps. Maggie was reading a section of The Book of Tequila (Nice recommendation, Jetzster!) about the negative effects wood aging has on tequila. This book claims more than three years aging will ruin a 100% agave tequila.

 

I don't know since I don't drink tequila and I prefer to look at the pictures instead of reading. Maggie may have been making it up.

 

I think about my favorite scotch and try to imagine what wood aging would do for absinthe. I'm striking out here and can't see it. I would be happy to give it a go and see if it's up to snuff, however.

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I must admit, I wouldn't trade the bottle of Milagro Reposado for any other tequila. It's been aged 3 years, and is one of the best I've tried. It's hard for me to imagine that aging another year would make it any worse, but who knows.

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Small oak barrel.

 

This sunday we tried a similar thing at the Bugnon distillery. A Clandestine Barrique so to speak.

 

Aged in a small oak cask for 6 months. Very interesting. Not bad.

Two separate flavours though, wood and absinthe, sort of.

 

My guess is that the Duplais Barrique was aged for just as long, or maybe a little shorter.

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The oak aged absinthe is spendy. Almost $50 (40 Eur) for 200 ml at Alandia for the Clandestine product (Absinthiana Barrique 53°)

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They're the only ones that have it, to my knowledge. Has Markus added the Duplais and/or the Clandestine Barrique? Haven't checked any vendor sites in a while.

 

My point was more directed to the price for such a dubious flavor enhancement. That's not going to change much.

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Thought you might have had an in with Claude-Alain as a merchant or barrique collaborator.

 

Do you actually buy any individual bottles of absinthe retail to drink?

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Thought you might have had an in with Claude-Alain as a merchant or barrique collaborator.

 

Do you actually buy any individual bottles of absinthe retail to drink?

 

I saw Claude-Alain in Boveresse, but because I was just there for the afternoon, I didn't speak with him.

 

Well, if I'm interested in a particular brand, than I manage to get a sample...

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The Clandestine was aged for 6 months, in a very small barrel, I'm guessing about 30l.

 

As Markus says, it tasted like absinthe, and like wood - the two tastes quite distinct and, imo, rather unpleasant in conjunction. There was no harmonious integration as is the case with cognac or whisky.

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I don't think this is off topic, but it might be.

You can add oak flavor to ANY spirit by soaking a small amount in a glass jar with oak chips. Most home wine and beer making stores will have toasted and charred oak chips.

This isn't the same as aging in an oak barrel but similar enough to see if you like it or not.

Just a few thoughts.

 

cheers--Ken

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I don't think this is off topic, but it might be.

You can add oak flavor to ANY spirit by soaking a small amount in a glass jar with oak chips. Most home wine and beer making stores will have toasted and charred oak chips.

This isn't the same as aging in an oak barrel but similar enough to see if you like it or not.

Just a few thoughts.

 

cheers--Ken

 

Yep, darn common trick (Arkansas hillbilly heritage) but should you be so curious, be certain you use white oak and perhaps cherry. Red oak has a reputation for imparting off flavors. (Is that the familiar strain of a banjo I hear?) ;)

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Agreed.

 

All new oak would do is add a noticeable hint of vanilla, (except for the wood, of course) which I think works better in ale than it would as a flavor component of absinthe.

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It's obviously an experiment, which interested me. It's debatable, if the typical wood taste goes well with Absinthe, at least I find it quite interesting, but this will not become a permanent available product.

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Hell, who knows?  It might mellow out in the bottle after a few months.

Most oaked liquors and ales seem to benefit from additional aging. I wouldn't attempt to judge one that had not been in the bottle for about 6 months for a liquor, or 3 months for an ale (don't know that any more than that would necessary).

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