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Guillaume Lanfray

Biblical Absinthe

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So the guy wanted a hyssop enema, and had a desire to be transformed into an albino...

 

Hey, we all have our little quirks. :)

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From the happy-hippy-witch, Jeanne Rose:

 

"The hyssop mentioned in the scriptures -- which was used in bunches for purificatory sprinkling rites and the ritual cleansing of lepers by the ancient Hebrews -- is probably not this hyssop (hyssopus officinalis) but a similar plant, the caper (capparis spirosa). But nonetheless, hyssop has been used for thousands of years -- as a purgative, and as a tea with honey for lung, nose, and throat infections. ... The leaves are laid on wounds to cure infection and to promote healing. In fact, penicillin mold grows and thrives on hyssop leaves."

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"In the symbolical language of the Apocalypse (Revelation 8:10,11) a star is represented as falling on the waters of the earth, causing the third part of the water to turn wormwood."

 

So, a third of the worlds' oceans turn to a wormwood liqueur? Heaven! Get the sugar ready!

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"...if all the matter in the universe except the nematodes were swept away, our world would still be dimly recognizable..." :blink:

 

Yikes! Methinks Nathan Augustus Cobb was, as Spiro Agnew might have said, a nattering nabob of nematodes in need of a good anthelmintic, like maybe absinthe, for instance! :cheers:

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From Mead Lover's Digest #100, Fri 19 March 1993:

A word of warning about mead hangovers: they are the stuff of legend-- and

rightly so! The combination of high alcohol content (relatively speaking) and

high sugar content are perfect for the induction of the Ultimate Hangover.

One author I've read on meads, in an attempt to convey to the reader the

potential severity of a mead hangover, referred to the Biblical story of

Judith and the Holofernes. The author pointed out that Judith saw to it that

the Holofernes got thoroughly drunk on mead, waited until they had slept

awhile, and then had the Hebrew army attack-- beating on their shields! As

the author put it: "What else could the Holofernes do but throw down their

arms and accept slaughter with gratitude?"

caravaggio%20judith.jpg

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Yup. There have been times that I would've welcomed being slaughtered with gratitude. Gotta be better than being slaughtered with malice. :P

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True, I too don't think it's apt. Even if it is highbrow elocution.

 

Besides, do you know how to actually say it properly?

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