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greytail

Did Ted change something?

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That's the whole point of this forum... never hesitate to give your HONEST opinion.
Um. No. That was the whole point of the Lounge.

No, the point of the Lounge is to express your honest opinion laced with vulgarity and abuse. Not that there's anything wrong with that, but there's a time and a place.

 

The point of this forum is to give your honest opinion with a bit of tact, diplomacy and respect. I realize that it's more fun to say "Wow, this shit sucks ass!" But it's not quite as useful as "I didn't care for this at all and here's why..."

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Yes, presentation for me is half the reason I drink absinthe.  The color really hasn't yellowed so much as thinned substantially.

 

Now that's another issue - it usually means the colouration step is different, and that influences the taste (not that it always tastes worse this way, of course, otherwise all blanches would be awful).

 

I think Ted is indeed tinkering a bit with the colouration steps of VS, NO and Eddy lately, in an effort to improve the taste (and despite his claims to Have Nailed It from Day One though Scientific Endeavour). That's certainly my impression from the newest bottles of VS and NO I've opened.

 

Still strange, though - Ted managed to make the pontica a bit less obtrusive in the most recent NO without affecting the colour too much.

 

Depending on the amount of variation in the quality of the herbs, I suspect this will continue to be the case.

 

This will only change if, or when, there is enough demand for the herbs to prompt farmers to once again undertake full scale production of them specifically for Absinthe production.

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As I posted a couple of weeks ago I was not very impressed with my first sample of Ed. To me it tastes like a mix of La Fee and Segarra.

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Now that's another issue - it usually means the colouration step is different, and that influences the taste (not that it always tastes worse this way, of course, otherwise all blanches would be awful).

 

Depending on the amount of variation in the quality of the herbs, I suspect this will continue to be the case. This will only change if, or when, there is enough demand for the herbs to prompt farmers to once again undertake full scale production of them specifically for Absinthe production.

 

 

I'm with Gimp here. I doubt Ted messed much with the colouring step process or herb quantity. Herb sourcing can have a HUGE impact on colour aesthetics. We have photographic proof:

http://www.oxygenee.com/absinthe-distillation.html

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I'm with Gimp here.  I doubt Ted messed much with the colouring step process or herb quantity.  Herb sourcing can have a HUGE impact on colour aesthetics.  We have photographic proof:

http://www.oxygenee.com/absinthe-distillation.html

 

I'm not so sure, at least as far as the VS is concerned.

 

After all, Arthur Frayn really dislikes the newer bottles (on the German forum) for the same reasons I prefer it over the Distiller's Proof (less present anise - though that could be an issue with the quality of the anis not being as good as in the distiller's proof, it does change the entire balance - , more present colouration herbs), and he also seems to think there's a large difference between the Distiller's Proof and current production; I don't even know if he's tried the same batch as I have.

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I was only speaking about the Edouard. As far as I can tell, the VS still is a distiller's proof, it's just not called that. I thought the first DP had a bolder flavour than the current incarnation, but the current version is more balanced, just not as creamy or spicy. The DP and Nov 2005 bottling I have both have identical colour: hazy olive.

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Not to beat a dead horse but, (well, I guess I am actually going to beat said dead horse here), does TAB ever weigh in on these types of questions? I love my Eddy just the way it is, all green in color that is. It makes a statement when first poured that really sets the stage for the louche magic that follows. Has anybody just asked him?

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I have learned to enjoy the ed, despite the color change, but it does detract from the whole experience. I would also like to hear from Ted on the matter, though i haven't bothered to question him directly.

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... does TAB ever weigh in on these types of questions?

From time to time, although he frequents FV more than here. Ted tends to be somewhat elusive and vague when discussing certain particulars of his process, which is of course, his prerogative.

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I just opened my bottle of Edouard (with the Fevrier 2006 stamp) last night and the color seems alright to me.

 

The scent after louch didn't seem to explode like it normally does and the taste seemed a little off (more of an alcohol bite than I'm used to with the Edouard).

 

Then again, I had only one glass...so it looks like it's Sampling Saturday at the Lanterne household. It's a beautiful thing.

 

For the record, I did also try more of my Eich and while it's still not on my favorites list it's growing on me.

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by saying that color seemed alright to you, are you meaning you are okay with the change in color or are you meaning your recent bottle is the same in coloration of earlier bottlings?

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I mean that the color didn't look as if it had changed to me.

 

I remembered your post as I poured the glass and watched it louche and as near as my non-connoisseur eye can tell, the color has not changed from the color of my last bottle of Edouard.

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well that certainly isn't good. It could mean I got a bottle that was not quite right. The date of bottling is stamped Fev 2006. Can you confirm that your bottle is the same or newer? Thanks. If this turns out to be one out of many bottles that had something wrong with the coloration than I must get in contact with Mr. B himself.

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Well, I've been trying to get pictures, but I can't get my camera to focus on the label well enough to read it.

 

The rear label of the bottle is stamped in the lower right hand corner with "Fev.2006" and the color is good, definitely not the yellowing tinge that you describe.

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Could you just post a pic of the Eddy in a glass, pre-louche then? That would really give us a clue. Thanks in advance.

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judging from those photos, I think I got a funky bottle. The color is definitetly different. Ted, if you happen to read this, please pm me and I would be happy to send you my 3/4s full bottle for you to anaylize.

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Thanks for the pic, LLV! I guess I would say that it does look slightly different to me, although I'm comparing my bottle of Nov's release as well as the pic that ShaiHulud posted earlier. Not very different, but it's there just the same. Maybe just batch to batch variations? As for the bottle and pic I saw from Greytail, well, that's just plain ugly! I'd inquire further if I were you, that's for sure. :drunk:

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If it were Fueille Morte, I'd be even happier since that's what it's SUPPPOSED to look like.

Within bounds, of course, brother. That damn Duplais turned brown quicker than I would have liked.

 

< Thought just popped in my head... does anyone know of a current absinthe that uses tansy in the coloration? >

 

I do know more than very well, search "Post your absinthe" thread and you will find it :)

Colouration requires no change, thus it is the most difficult part of the process. If absinthe gets the feuille morte shade within time (6 months is enough), that absinthe must be good, if there is something wrong with feuille morte (non-existent) something must have been skrewed either by accident or on purpose.

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If absinthe gets the feuille morte shade within time (6 months is enough), that absinthe must be good, if there is something wrong with feuille morte (non-existent) something must have been skrewed either by accident or on purpose.

 

Um, no. I have seen many quality (some HGs) that have been made with no mistakes, either by accident or on purpose, that still are a nice shade of green. Many that I have seen have turned from bright green to a shade of olive green over a few years time.

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After few years of aging before bottling absinthe may undergo other unnecessarily good changes, especially in taste (bitter chocolate aftertaste, wormwood less pronounced or astringency to name a few) so it is not recommended to keep it that long, the colour will beautifully transform, yes but 6 months is absolutely enough for absinthe to be excellent in texture, form and colour as well.

 

If you are making mistake, it is done and irreversible and will affect not only the colour which is byproduct and only part of aesthethics if there is desire for a quality. Feuille morte is still a nice shade of green even though it is not the initial peridot. Thus, if these absinthes you have seen remained peridot, they must been:

 

a ) artificially enhanced (it could be chlorophyll)

b ) not aged at all, but bottled instantenously after colouration

c ) coloured too much or maybe some alum was used to hold the colour in suspension (it was also mentioned in the heyday)

d ) applied one of two types of colourations, i.e. hot and cold which may have different results then

What still does not question their quality as they might be tasting good and mellow.

 

Colour of absinthe is affected by the percentage as well, hencoforth absinthe at 60% will fade as quickly as possible (however, the case is chlorophyll, if it is hibiscus for absinthe rouge at 60% it will stand the taste of time getting only a bit orange nuances but remaining red) whereas the historically recommended 72% will stay much longer, even if kept in clear glass.

 

Talking of colours, take verdigris for instance, some of them can be so bluish that you might mistake them for blue ones, still, they are classified as greens.

post-1144-1175844664.jpg

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it is not recommended to keep it that long, the colour will beautifully transform, yes but 6 months is absolutely enough for absinthe to be excellent in texture, form and colour as well.

It is most certainly recommended to keep it that long... just not feasible for those who make poor absinthe that doesn't keep well or producers who are met daily with the difficulties of sitting on a product for that sort of duration.

Villon, La Nature, 1894, II. L'absinthe, 150.

"Le viellissement de l'absinthe est une question de premier ordre. Il communique à cette liqueur des propriétés particulièrement recherchées.

Le procédé le plus simple consiste à laisser l'absinthe vieillir d'elle-même, dans des fûts, pendant 2, 3, 4 et même 5 ans..."

Absinthe, like any other well-made spirit benefits from long rest, careful keeping... which is set at naught where a distillateur was... well... lacking.

 

Colouring is very integral to the overall quality of a verte absinthe, though I wouldn't go so far as to say that the presence or absence of a feuille morte after 6 months of age, singularly dictates by some rule of thumb that an absinthe is of poor or proper manufacture. The strength of the spirit both before and after an absinthe is coloured, the quality and choice of colouring herbs, the preparation, heating method, time that the colouring plants contact the spirit, storage, racking, etc. - each factor into the scent and chlorophyllic stability of an absinthe by the time it is bottled. I know for a fact that traditionally made absinthe, both of commercial and artisanale origin, exist that exhibit hardly any of the jaunit en vieillissant that you mention... even after 6 months.

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But if it so, do we have (had) absinthes that are 5 yrs old before bottling? Villon, in the same paragraph mentions: "pour eviter l'imobilisation d'enormes capitaux, on a cherche a vieillir artificiellement et rapidement les absinthes" and explains the techniques used to do so in-depth; however some lines above licorice root is also mentioned as another way of making absinthe taste like an aged which is also described by J. Fritsch.

 

I know, too such absinthes that do not undergo any changes in colour or scent or taste but the way Duplais put it is some sort of rule of a thumb; obviously, methods of aging applied nowadays will differ much from those of the heyday (en futs Villon indicates) and thus will affect the colour even further.

 

5 yrs is o.k. assuming another style of aging is preferred but IMHO it is too long; being by years 1-2 would be just enough having of course taken into consideration the amount to be aged and how: will it be a small batch or not.

 

Any spirit aged for too long is prone to diminish its quality. Example? Slivovitz that should not be aged in oak as the taste is grossly affected (that mistake is made in Passover Slivovitz which is 12 yrs old and has nothing to do the genuine plum taste), the same happens with tequila anejo which has a strict limit of time, i.e AFAIK (please correct me as I am not tequila expert) - 5 yrs.

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