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greytail

Did Ted change something?

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I also like the color better than the Eddie.

 

Peridot is not Emerald.

 

Agreed.

 

Although I'm sure the color of the Edouard was always all natural, it certainly looked too vivid to be anything but artificially enhanced.

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I have had the second formulation of the montmartre and I can confirm that the coloration of the bottle of Ed I have is almost if not identical, minus any bluish tints.

 

 

On a side note, I can't believe that I am the only one, it seems, who has the Feb. bottling and has been able to compare the two different bottlings. I know there must be more out there. What say you?

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Just on a parallel note, I have a bottle of NO that has a beautiful label, fantastic colour but I hate the taste. Wish I'd ordered the February formulation of Eddie instead, despite the colour!

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THat is the point. Why should I have to spend 99USD for a bottle which looks different? Adding my own colorant? Nah. If it is going to look different, LDF and Ted need to state the reasons why the newer bottlings will look a more pale green. It is just good buisness. Nothing to it.

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This has been discussed before...

 

La couleur verte de l'absinthe jaunit en vieillissant et prend alors une teinte feuille morte. La nuance verte peut être conservée, en ajoutant, après le mélange, 15 grammes d'alun de Rome, dissous dans verre d'eau; mais généralement la nuance jaunâtre est préférée par les consommateurs. En vieillissant, l'absinthe acquiert de la qualité; elle perd ce goût d'âcreté et d'empyreume que lui communiquent la distillation et la coloration.

 

As far as I can tell, the Jades are the first example of a commercial absinthe attempting to blend individual batches to imbue the character of age and mellow out the taste of a young, forward absinthe. Some may say the hue is a by-product of an aged product being blended with a newer batch (I betcha the earlier Edouard was stored en vrac post-coloration); some may also contend that the coloring is flawed; others, that the quality of the coloring herbs is a factor, or even that an alteration in primary maceration herbs has urged the color towards a yellower tint; some say it's burnt. I don't know.

 

Not that I am treating the Jades in specific, but we need to consider that until we have quality absinthe made available by a producer that has the means and demand to store and blend large volumes of absinthe for 2-5 years, it will be difficult to express the condition of products that a consumer was capable of experiencing at the height of absinthe -- that is near the latter part of the 19th century (not 5-10 years after the appearance of Pernod Fils).

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THat is the point.  Why should I have to spend 99USD for a bottle which looks different?  Adding my own colorant?  Nah.  If it is going to look different, LDF and Ted need to state the reasons why the newer bottlings will look a more pale green.

 

 

I missed the "Looks REALLY green!!" sticker on the bottles that would let you DEMAND a vividly green absinthe or feel conned.

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Guess I missed the stickers too, cause I never seen one. You missed my point I guess. I was rather looking at the sticker that reminds me why I should buy the same product again. Sort of like knowing when you buy a coke, you know it will be the same color unless otherwise stated.

 

Relax sixela. I am not going to sue anyone over it.

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You missed my point I guess.

Okie-doke.

 

Well, here's so you don't miss mine:

The shade is definitely lighter on the end of yellow rather than green.

La couleur verte de l'absinthe jaunit en vieillissant et prend alors une teinte feuille morte...

I just tasted a bit of the Edouard neat. WOW. the last bottling I had was nowhere near as smooth...

En vieillissant, l'absinthe acquiert de la qualité; elle perd ce goût d'âcreté et d'empyreume que lui communiquent la distillation et la coloration...

 

:cheers:

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That is the point.  Why should I have to spend 99USD for a bottle which looks different?  Adding my own colorant?  Nah.  If it is going to look different, LDF and Ted need to state the reasons why the newer bottlings will look a more pale green.  It is just good buisness.  Nothing to it.

 

 

Woe is me, my absinthe looks different. :dribble:

This is some of the silliest nonsense I've read here in a while.

 

The lighter color is probably closer to the original lab samples of the Edouard.

 

Keep reading what Grimmy posts, until you get it.:wacko:

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Is Peridot the color of the VS and Nov bottling of JE?  I was thinking it was emerald, but then again I have been wrong before.

Both colors are named for gems which range in hue, but peridot is generally used to describe a slightly lighter, yellower green whereas emerald describes a bluer green. You can Google them for images.

 

Pernod Fils was described as being yellower still, as olive green.

 

"Sort of like knowing when you buy a coke, you know it will be the same color unless otherwise stated."

 

This is a hand-crafted artisanal product made in very small batches, not mass-produced. Although this does seem to be a bit more of a change than I would have expected, it's bound to change somewhat from batch to batch.

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Not tryin' to deride the man...

 

We'd be better served - if he intends to just toss the bottle aside - if he swapped samples with those who haven't tried it yet (not me... I had both the VS and Edouard 3 weeks or so ago).

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Although it is a pretty drastic change, and I can see it as a shock (and I bet the yellower color would get rated lower on the FV score sheet) it shouldn't be unexpected. Distillers are dealing with a rather volatile coloring chemical that easily degrades. We have seen color issues with other small batch products like the first run of Montmartre where some reported the bright green faded quickly.

 

It would seem there are only a couple solutions. Mix new products with a large and stable older batch to produce a more consistent drink (something no one is really up to yet) or artificial coloring (Alan Moss has mentioned the need for a consistent stable color as the reason La Fee is artificially colored).

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Grim already said everything you need to know. We're at the VERY beginning of absinthe which begins to approach what was produced before the ban. Consistency of product is something that comes later.

 

You've got to take Ted/Jade's marketing hype at face value, and not expect it to be as flawless as the marketing projects it to be. What product on this planet does live up to its own hyperbole marketing? Jade is a work in progress, regardless of what anybody who makes it or sells it says. Pernod Fils was certainly a work in progress throughout its entire life. They changed recipes, changed stills, the factory burnt down and was rebuilt, herb sources came and went. It was then banned and they tried to make the same thing in Tarragonna and didn't get it quite right. The only reason people weren't banging on their door complaining about something as petty as colouring tint was because they had THOUSANDS of liters of previous product to blend it with, thus smoothing out any variations over MANY batches. Jade is at the very very beginning stages of doing that. It takes time and patience.

 

In other words, just put up with it for now. It tastes fine, doesn't it? You're not using the Edouard in a modeling shoot, are you? I just had a glass of my Edouard. Still vibrant green, and I have only very minor complaints (whopper price tag and pungent alcohol base). If it were Fueille Morte, I'd be even happier since that's what it's SUPPPOSED to look like.

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or artificial coloring (Alan Moss has mentioned the need for a consistent stable color as the reason La Fee is artificially colored).

 

 

No, that was the road Sazerac took that ended up screwing up Herbsaint.

 

That's the worst possible path to take. (You cut corners in one place, then...... :angry2: )

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If it were Fueille Morte, I'd be even happier since that's what it's SUPPPOSED to look like.

Within bounds, of course, brother. That damn Duplais turned brown quicker than I would have liked.

 

< Thought just popped in my head... does anyone know of a current absinthe that uses tansy in the coloration? >

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Whatever the absinthe is being aged/blended in, it must do SOMETHING to the absinthe, since older bottled Edouard seems to have the same bright green tint it had when it was new (mine from June 2005 has the exact same colour it did new).

 

OK, now I am curious. If your June 2005 bottled/distilled? Ed was originally bright green and persisted with its bright green color (I am assuming you mean nearly a year later), then please add a comment regarding the taste. Has it "mellowed" or "aged" and thus lost its "acridness and empyreume" in a manner like this latest batch of Ed? Or is it maintaining its original, rebellious kick? I am just trying to follow the discussion and figure out if Ted is really, truly perfecting the aging of his product or if this latest batch is a product of happenstance. If the persistent green of the earlier batch never properly ages/mellows in the bottle, then is the new version attractive for its maturity (before bottling) and worth the lost hue?

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No, the Edouard I have definitely tastes as good if not better than the previous bottles I have had. This discussion I created was only about the coloration. So, at the end of the day, though I am disappointed that it looks slightly different, it is still a good CO I would recommend to anyone.

 

 

I can definitely understand, even though I don't distill absinthe, that the production of something like the Jades on a small scale would be walking a tight rope to get the same results every time.

 

I also realize that if I had just read the reviews of the Jade Edouard over at feeverte and especially paid attention to the color before water part, then I purchased a bottle of the JE and opened it only to find a color inconsistent with all the reviews, I might tend to be a bit shocked. That was one long sentence mates.

 

 

With that I rest my case and am over the shock of the difference in color. I had a glass before bed last evening and once I got past the color I fully enjoyed my drink.

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Within bounds, of course, brother.  That damn Duplais turned brown quicker than I would have liked.

 

Actually, the latest batch of Duplais Verte uses a different coloring technique and keeps its color much better. Also tastes much smoother.

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I checked my new bottle of Edouard this morning and it did have the fevrier stamp on it, so I'll be interested to find out how it looks. Maybe Saturday...

 

I don't understand, though, how adding absinthe from an older batch to the new would affect the color. I mean, the absinthe that they're talking about adding would be the absinthe from the old batches BEFORE they went through the maceration coloring process, wouldn't it? Or do they actually take the finished product of the older batches and add it to the finished new batch?

 

Anyway, I'm sure it's still great stuff. Already looking forward to Saturday.

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The VS was sinked at LautrecFest.

 

Yeah - but I still have a hard time understanding why it apparently smelled of rotten eggs. I don't know what happened to that bottle.

 

FWIW, I also sinked the rest of the distiller's proof once I opened my new "Nov 2005" bottle.

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