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sleepdemon

Nutritional Information

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I'm sure this could generate a lot of interesting responses, but in all honesty I was just wondering if an ounce of absinthe would measure up to say an ounce of vodka with regard to nutritional information. I know some of the bad stuff they add sugar and what not, but the real stuff?

 

Per ounce vodka has roughly 70 calories, no fat, no carbs. I was wondering if there were any natural sugars imparted during the distilling process in the absinthe we drink, take for example Kübler 53 or Clandestine Le Bleu?

 

I apologize for a super lame post, I'll make it up. Please don't ban me. :(

 

Thx!!

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I only ban assholes, not dumbasses. :devil: (You asked for that.)

 

I'm going to guess that the amount of oils present in absinthe are such a small percentage of its makeup that the actual nutritional value isn't going to be much different than the same proof of neutral spirits.

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I flunked every one of my math courses for six consecutive years, so cut me some slack.

 

According to CalorieCounter.com:

 

80 proof rum, vodka, gin or whiskey contains about 64 calories per ounce

90 proof rum, vodka, gin or whiskey contains about 73 calories per ounce

100 proof rum, vodka, gin or whiskey contains about 82 calories per ounce

 

It would appear that the calories go up with the proof — 9 calories for every 10 degrees. Figure 85 calories for an ounce of CLB; 117 calories for an ounce of Eddie.

 

Zero carbs, fat, protein, etc.

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Actually, the calories are all carbohydrate, and have the same effect on blood glucose levels as simple sugars.

 

That'd be why diabetics ain't spozed to drink, ya see.

 

An absinthe's particular caloric (simple carbohydrate) content would depend upon the ingredients in the distillation; however, the alcohol itself is going to be the prime factor. The sugars from anise, fennel, etc. would only be increases by degree rather than order of magnitude.

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While beer, wine, cordials, and liqueurs contain carbohydrates, hard (distilled) liquors do not. Vodka, gin, brandy, rum, whisky contain no carbs.

 

Here's a page on alcohol, calories, and carbs from the UC Berkeley Wellness Letter. The Wellness Letter does advise against the "mindless consumption" of vodka, whiskey, or other "zero-carb" drinks.

 

There are a host of reasons why diabetics have to monitor their intake of alcoholic beverages very carefully. Anyone interested in details can start here:

 

The American Diabetes Association

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I'm not sure about calories, but 3 glasses of Absinthe contain 100% of the recommended daily allowance of Thujone.

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While ... Here's a page on alcohol, calories, and carbs from the UC Berkeley Wellness Letter. There are a host of reasons why diabetics have to monitor their intake of alcoholic beverages very carefully. Anyone interested in details can start here:

 

The American Diabetes Association

 

Well, color me corrected.

 

Here's another bit I didn't know (from diabetes.org):

 

If you are on a low-calorie meal plan, think twice about adding alcohol. In general, alcohol counts as fat servings (1 drink equals 2 fat exchanges).

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I missed that.....interesting. Booze is fat-free, so it must have something to do with the way the body processes alcohol.

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Bottom-line is that absinthe isn't (unless it is sugar-DEhanced swill) have any different profile then any other hard spirit. While stuff like chambord, creme de menthe, and Bailey's will be different, your hard stuff is the same.

 

Alcohol, calorically, is a sugar, which is a carb, which is 4 calories per gram. Period.

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