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The Jade Blanchette has a faint straw colour and it's plenty drinkable. :cheers:

 

Has anyone tried a Blanche with an orange tinge and compared it to a glass of the same drop without the tinge? It might help clarify what, if any effect this colour taint has.

 

I say you get hold of a bottle of another batch without the taint and try them side by side. Make sure you drink at least four or five glasses of each... just to be sure. Plus, you'll also need a control group, so get two bottles of Clandestine and drink from them too, so you have a frame of reference to what two identical bottles taste like. Plus you'll want something to break up the blanches so get yourself a Verte, like a montmartre or VdF. But you'll need something to clense your pallate between glasses, so get yourself a teapot and fill it with Kübler. After a few rounds of these, you'll realise that you have no need for any drinks other than Absinthe, so pre-empt this epiphany by disconnecting your water pipes and connecting them to a vat of Emile. Then, drain your swimming pool and....

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so pre-empt this epiphany by disconnecting your water pipes and connecting them to a vat of Emile.

I'd have to say you'll hardly know the difference (I say after having compared UE to more recently commercialised absinthes) ;) .

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Thanks for posting that, sixela! It's important for people to know the dangers of DHMO.

 

I've heard that even in the nineteenth century, people were "spiking" absinthe by placing it into solution with large quantities of dihydrogen monoxide ( often in staggeringly high proportions, as much as 3 times the amount of DHMO as there was actual absinthe in the solution ), and that it was possibly the mixing of this chemical with absinthe that accounted for the rumoured madness of absinthism!

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and that it was possibly the mixing of this chemical with absinthe that accounted for the rumoured madness of absinthism!

 

It's worse. Adding DHMO brings many of the essential oils out of the solution, and dramatically alters the appearance of the product. It is rumoured that even that did not deter the absinthist, and that he still consumed the beverage, turning a blind eye to those obviously deleterious effects!

 

Fortunately, the Czech Ministry of Health has tried to force the absinth producers to craft a product that doesn't incite people to add DHMO.

 

But the unintended side effect of the Ministry's guidelines was that DHMO-addition in these products became undetectable, producing no visual cues, as the distilleries were trying to protect their customers hooked on DHMO from being arrested on the spot.

 

It's rumoured that some Czech absinthsts [sic] have been consuming so much DHMO that the chemical compound makes up 60% of their body mass - or more if they're young and/or emaciated.

 

--

Incidentally, I really read a claim that setting the absinth on fire increased -- nay, multiplied -- the thujone content! If course, it's not lying, strictly speaking, as multiplying with something close to one is also mulptiplying.

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I've actually managed to convince a rather slow-witted friend of my sister's to sign a petition trying to force the government to ban Dihydrogen Monoxide. I even had a bunch of fliers for her to give out, but someone told her about the joke.

 

Don't feel bad, she's a vacuous attention seeker who will jump on any political bandwagon for the one week that Paris Hilton is endorsing it, then forget about it the next day. I even saw her handing out anti-fur fliers in a Leather Jacket. When I asked her "Isn't that hypocrisy?" ... she responded "No, it's Gucci."

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Harry Lime: "Don't be so gloomy. After all it's not that awful. Like the fella says, in Italy for 30 years under the Borgias they had warfare, terror, murder, and bloodshed, but they produced Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci, and the Renaissance. In Switzerland they had brotherly love - they had 500 years of democracy and peace, and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock."

Holly Martins: "And absinthe."

(an outtake from The Third Man)

Guillaume, I like your quotation, having grown up in Vienna, The Third Man has a special place in my heart.

(From eAbsinthe.com)

Kübler 53%

A wonderful absinthe from Kübler that proves Orson Welles was wrong! In the Third Man, he says, "In Switzerland, they had brotherly love - they had 500 years of democracy and peace, and what did that produce? The cuckoo clock." Now add Kübler to that list of Swiss achievements!

The chicken or the egg? :unsure: Edited by Guillaume Lanfray

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The page cannot be found. And the site won't load.

 

Maybe THAT'S why people seem to limit themselves to one or two favored vendors?

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:laf:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The first time in a year this emoticon has been appropriate.

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I chuckle when I see that Trainer has posted to thread titled "White Fairy".
I'll post too, then. Knock yourselves out!

 

End of story.

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No, really. Knock yourself out. Use the bottle of K(&&*@#$(*BLER.

 

And Hiram, I had whacked the URL all the way back to www.eabsinthe.com, and it wouldn't load. That'd be what I meant by "the site won't load." It was probably down.

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the white fairy was recently modified. how? without being able to drastically change the basic recipe, which we were not allowed until recently, i had them stop adding pure alcohol along with the water when reducing it.

 

Sorry for such a late reply, but I only now understand what this statement might mean :D

 

In Duplais, Fritsch and other manuals, this description of adding alcohol and water when reducing the distillate is used in producing absinthe fines, demi-fine, and ordinaire. Correct? (See for example pages 378-379 of Duplais 4th edition (1882). So you have upgraded the White Fairy to more of an absinthe suisse protocol would be my understanding. Did I correctly understand what you wrote? This is a good improvement, yes?

 

LDF also bought absinthe plants from the local fields for them to use, which are significantly stronger (and younger) than herb-supplier plants. whether anyone notices or not, the amount of absinthe in the un emiles and white fairy is around 3 times more than the typical historical recipe.

 

Is this due to using the fresh plant having greater weight than dry herbs? EG not as much water removed from the plant material before use. Or something different? The historical recipes vary considerably in the ratios of wormwood/anise/fennel. For example, Duplais gives (in kg for 100 liters)

 

Absinthe ordinaire 2.5/2/0

Absinthe semi-fine 2.5/4/1

Absinthe fine 2.5/5/2

 

Compared with the Absinthe Suisse of

Pontarlier 2/5/5

Montpellier 2/6/4

Lyon 3/8/4

Fougerolles 2.5/7.5/4

 

 

I don't want the recipe for the White Fairy :D , I'm just trying to understand the relationship between the old recipes and the old techniques and how that effects the end result when we attempt to "replicate" them with our modern technology. As you say later on (and I don't quote that) the filtration system used previously was perhaps too aggressive. Have any hair sieves come down to us? My hypothesis is they merely removed plant particulate and not the all important Flavor Molecules™. I'm not a chemist so I'm sure you and/or the good Doctors will correct my erroneous view of reality quite soon.

 

 

:cheers:

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