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Just had the monkeys drop off a bottle of White Fairy and Clandestine. Looking at the bottles I am surprised by how yellow the White Fairy looks, the Clandestine looks blue but that's the bottle.

Isn't the yellow colour a flaw?

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OK here is my problem, and I don't mean the lousy photography! According to the picture on the right, from the Absinthe reviews in WS, White Fairy ought to be totally clear, mine is more yellow than the Blanchette.

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post-588-1145041518.jpg

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Maybe one of the essential oils is burnt.

 

Or change your bar incandescent lighting to fluorescent.

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But how could LDF ship a product so clearly flawed?

 

IMO A yellow tint is not necessarily indicative of a flawed absinthe. I have seen this happen when high quality(lots of flowers) wormwood is used in the macerate.

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Their macerate for distilling their absinthium essential oil for mixing? Maybe, but doubtful. Probably empyreumatic.

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I am sure that there is more than one school of thought when it comes to this issue. I do know of some makers that reduce the amount of wormwood in the recipe whilst making a blanche in order to avoid a yellow tint.

 

" I have only seen amber hue in tails, never in the heart."

 

It usually starts turning yellow(not amber) about two thirds through the run the times I have seen it.

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Reduced wormwood in the blanches?

 

By how much?

 

Usually down to about 20g/l or slightly less. Also, Using wormwood that has a higher proportion of leaves(less flowers) produces a distillate that is white, and has a more subtle wormwood flavor.

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I haven't opened it as I am considering sending it back from whence it came.

Sit it in a sunny window for a day or two first.

 

Cosmetic or not, I'd consider a yellow blanche flawed, or at least not ready to sell. However, it may not affect the flavor in a negative way.

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Does this color flaw change the properties of the louche? Is not a blanche supposed to have a slightly bluish tint, aside from pure white?

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I'm not sure if the product photograph and your photograph are of differently coloured bottles.

 

Your photo doesn't even half of the light that the product photo does. Never mind the pure white around it and the fact they probably have diffuse light with soft boxes and all kinds of stuff.

 

You can see it in the labels, yours show a lot more the knotting or whatever one might call it.

 

The production photo may be bright enough that the yellow dissapears or it may have been adjusted as well in Photoshop.

 

The White Fairy may be just be a touch jaundiced.

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I tasted a nice non commercial blanche of Euro origin that had a slight yellow tint.

 

Flawed or not, it was pretty tasty.

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The White Fairy may be just be a touch jaundiced.

Before theorising any further, I would be surprised if there wasn't anyone else here who has bought a bottle of White Fairy.

For instance, I went to www.absinthe.se and looked at the picture that Hartsmar has taken, and his bottle looks absolutely clear with no yellow tints.

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the white fairy was recently modified. how? without being able to drastically change the basic recipe, which we were not allowed until recently, i had them stop adding pure alcohol along with the water when reducing it. LDF also bought absinthe plants from the local fields for them to use, which are significantly stronger (and younger) than herb-supplier plants. whether anyone notices or not, the amount of absinthe in the un emiles and white fairy is around 3 times more than the typical historical recipe.

the distillate comes out slightly tinted (and this color starts significantly before the distillate is considered tails), as does the combier blanchette.

it is virtually impossible to 'burn' a distillation done in a commercial bain-marie alambic.

the distillery was also instructed not to filter the white fairy before bottling, which is normally done through a multi-layered cellulose plate contraption which is quite aggressive in terms of removing more than just unsightly particals or tint.

we have found this type of filtering also strips flavor and anethol, and as everyone knows, the pernot absinthes certainly don't need less anethol than they have.

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I'm not sure if the product photograph and your photograph are of differently coloured bottles.

 

Your photo doesn't even half of the light that the product photo does.  Never mind the pure white around it and the fact they probably have diffuse light with soft boxes and all kinds of stuff.

 

You can see it in the labels, yours show a lot more the knotting or whatever one might call it.

 

The production photo may be bright enough that the yellow dissapears or it may have been adjusted as well in Photoshop.

If you're referring to the photo on the right above, it's one that I took about two years ago. As with all the other bottles on the reviews page, it was taken in my living room with the bottle sitting on a rickety pre-ban chair with a piece of white fabric draped over it (nylon, I believe). It was taken in natural, diffused sunlight and the only photoshopping was a light "soft-focus" effect.

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For instance, I went to www.absinthe.se and looked at the picture that Hartsmar has taken, and his bottle looks absolutely clear with no yellow tints.

 

The old recipe gave a transparent (but probably inferior) product.

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If you're referring to the photo on the right above, it's one that I took about two years ago.  As with all the other bottles on the reviews page, it was taken in my living room with the bottle sitting on a rickety pre-ban chair with a piece of white fabric draped over it (nylon, I believe).  It was taken in natural, diffused sunlight and the only photoshopping was a light "soft-focus" effect.

 

That explains why it's been opened! :drunk:

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