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TheGreenOne

One Born Every Minute

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Good night. I would be disinclined to drink that with water, much less neat.

Have any of you ever had a barrel-aged absinthe?

~

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Does pre-ban Pernod Fils count?

I didn't know that pre-ban Pernod Fils was barrel aged, I should I suppose do more research than a precursory glance and drink.

I'll do a search on barrel-aging before any further inquisition.

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Does pre-ban Pernod Fils count?

I didn't know that pre-ban Pernod Fils was barrel aged, I should I suppose do more research than a precursory glance and drink.

I'll do a search on barrel-aging before any further inquisition.

Guess what's in these:

post-39-1142707828_thumb.jpg

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There's a good reason why some vendors just don't make onto Hiram's recommended list.

 

To be honest, Segarra 45's distinctive flavour does probably come from aging in oak casks. I don't think the barrels in the PF factory imparted that much flavour to the absinthe stored in them, though.

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Just thinking of the thousands of gallons of absinthe gestating in those barrels does things to me that can't be mentioned in polite society.

 

Now I just feel dirty, Hiram. Thanks a lot. :P

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Check out their "rarity" sektion (raritäten).

120 EUR for a bottle of Kübler 57. I know where to buy it over the counter for 48 EUR...

 

Edit: Saw the 120 was 0.5 liter the 48 is for 1.0 liter :P

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Considering the size and age of the tuns that were used for aging the Pernod Absinthe, I do not believe they imparted any perceptable flavour or aroma to the product.

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Nope just what I said.

They want 120 EUR for 0.5 liter of Kübler 57.

I bought 1.0 liter for 48 EUR just about a month ago.

 

They must be living of the ignorance of the masses...

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I have an unopened bottle of Kübler 57. Maybe I should sell it on ebay as vintage burnt blanche absinthe.

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No need to take it to ebay, I'll give you $48 for it. And then you may also take the shipping fee if you like. :devil:

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I wouldn't describe pre-ban Pernod as "barrel-aged" in this sense. Large wooden vats such as Pernod used are functionally no different from modern stainless steel tanks - they're simply a method for storing the liquid in bulk. At the time Pernod Fils was made, the stainless steel alternative didn't exist, so wood vats like this were the only option. Both because of the size of the vats, and because they were used for many years consecutively, they would have imparted essentially no noticable wood character to the drink they contained. Vats like this were (and occasionally still are) used to store Riesling in Germany, and here any type of wood character in the finished wine is definitely undesirable - because the vats are large and old, they impart none. Pernod Fils aim was to age their absinthe, not for it to pick up "wood-aged" characteristics.

 

In common parlance in the wine (or cognac, or whisky) industry, barrel-aged means aged in small barrels of 225l or 300l capacity, and implies that the barrels are either new, or only a few years old (probably less than 3 years, certainly not older than 5 years - after 3 years a barrel imparts almost no wood tannins, after 5 years, it imparts none at all).

 

In French - and in the wine and spirits industry - barrique - the word used in the Alandia absinthe - almost always means the 225l/59 gallon barrel originated in Bordeaux, but now used widely outside the region as well. In Burgundy the standard barrel is the 228l pièce, in Chablis it is the small 132l feuilette. The type of large barrels used by Pernod would more correctly be called tonneau (or tuns in English).

 

If the Alandia description is correct (ie not a misprint), then this absinthe was aged in a 5l barrel - this is a tabletop product, made for decorative use in bars, and has no commercial application (as it hold the equivalent of less than 7 bottles). In such tiny barrels wine and spirits behave unpredictably, but usually rapidly succumb to excessive oxidation. So this is gimmick, and a poorly thought out one at that.

 

Segarra, by the way, can correctly be described as barrel aged, because Julian Segarra uses the small 225l barricas bordelesas he's previously used for ageing his brandy - they impart both an oaky and (especially) a brandy-like quality to the finished product. This is what gives Segarra its distinctive if slightly eccentric character.

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So what to make of the "Absinthiana Barrique"? Noble experiment? Marketing trial balloon? Icarus flying too close to the sun?

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I think the 5L cask is just marketing bull shit.

 

The smallest cask I'm aware of that is practical is around 20L. When I lived in Spain as a kid, I saw quite a few 20L Sherry Casks.

 

I now own one that is over 40 years old that contains Oleroso Sherry. The cask continues to impart it's own characteristics to the sherry, even though it is topped with inexpensive Taylor Dry Sherry.

 

Two%20Sherrys.jpg

 

On the left is Taylor Dry Sherry. On the right is what comes out of the cask.

 

This is the Solera Sherry Process, which is different from what Pernod did. Solera is an aging process to give consistent characteristics to sherry through aging in a live sherry cask.

 

My understanding is that Pernod and other B.E. Absinthe manufacturers used large tuns to allow them to remove a portion for sale, and refill with fresh absinthe. This would have averaged out product variations from run to run, as well as variations due to seasonal changes in herb quality.

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