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hectma

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...French is tough....I'm SLOWLY getting there.

 

 

Adventure means showing up at CDG airport knowing only "Je ne parle pas Francais". Go to a place that looks like a restaurant, point at your mouth, point at a random menu item, enjoy! When it comes time to pay fork over euros until they smile, and hope they are honest with the change.

 

What saved me is that much of the wait-staff I ran into where hispanic. Kinda like Texas, but instead of a river, in France they cross mountains.

Edited by Miguel

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Wow Clement, I'd only ever seen the rendering of that one on an old catalog page - nice score, and thanks for posting pics!

I'd love to se the catalog reference if you have it !

Otherwise, thanks guys.

 

I'd be interested in seing this too, Jay.

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To Clement and Phoenix:

 

I don't have a scan or link I can direct you to, but that beautiful tronc looked to me like one I had seen in the "Orfevrerie N. Cailar, Bayard & Co" catalog pic that's in the Delahaye Cuilleres book. I looked it up again (it's on p. 281 of the 2nd edition, if you have the book), and Clement's item doesn't have the same kind of band around the middle, but it's otherwise very similar.

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Here's the setup I'm using. Two kids and animals don't afford me the luxuryof fine antiques.The glass I purchased at a thrift store for about a dollar.The carafe and tray are part of a set that I found at a garage sale for Five dollars(the carafe pours very nice).The decanter was a birthday gift from my parents. The spoon came with a bottle of La Muse Verte and Mansinthe is what's in the decanter.

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I've been away from the forum for awhile, so wanted to post an update of my current gear and selection.

 

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Absinthes pictured from left to right include: Taboo, Taboo Gold, Nouvelles-Orleans, La Maison Fontaine, Vintage Pernod Fils, La Clandestine, Roquette 1797, a sampler of Edouard Pernod Lunel circa 1880, and a sampler of an unknown Pontarlier style absinthe circa 1865.

 

Accessories include a spoon holder, variety of spoons, 3 saucers, 3 glasses, an auto-brouillere, sugar bowl, sugar dish, and a fountain.

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That's a nice layout, Chuck. Good on you for nabbing three bottles of Taboo - my girlfriend was physically in Quebec City a year and a half ago, and STILL couldn't get it due to the distribution issues. Have a glass for us! :cheers:

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That's a nice layout, Chuck. Good on you for nabbing three bottles of Taboo - my girlfriend was physically in Quebec City a year and a half ago, and STILL couldn't get it due to the distribution issues. Have a glass for us! :cheers:

 

Thanks! Taboo is actually made here in BC, so it's fairly accessible. "Most" liquor stores here carry it. The two bottles with the gold top though were part of a special release through Oxygenee. The flavour is a little more refined than the normal release. I'm having a glass as I type this for ya ;)

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Some little things I brought back from les absinthiades

 

A vintage sugar bowl, made by Georges Long, the main fountain maker in 1900, with exactly the same features as a fountain

sucrier.jpg

 

A terminus brouille

terminus.jpg

 

And this Pontarlier glass I loved at the first sight

pontarlier4.jpg

 

And a few weeks before, this cute little brouilleur entered my collection

brouillemono.jpg

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Those are some great finds!! I love the sugarbowl. I have seen one of those glass brouilleurs with the monogram before. Do you know any more details or anything about it's history? I'd be interested to learn a little more. I don't know a lot about the Terminus brouilleurs either, but I am fixing to get ahold of one soon :yahoo: Those holes look smaller than a lot of them that I have seen. Did they all come new with holes that small? Making all with larger holes having been modified? Also, were they only made with 4 holes? Thanks for any info!

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I have seen one of those glass brouilleurs with the monogram before. Do you know any more details or anything about it's history?

They are rather thin, so they are probably of spanish make, for the post-ban spanish market, much like the Pernod tarragona branded brouilleur.

They came out this time in a lot of 8 if my memory is correct, some of them were intact, some had minor defects

 

Those holes look smaller than a lot of them that I have seen. Did they all come new with holes that small?

Hum I can't be definite on this one. There have been several version of the famous Cusenier see saw brouilleur, with several sizes, shapes of the see saw, etc. Why not several sizes for the holes in the terminus...

 

There is for example a very scarce other model known of the Terminus with 6 holes (personnal collection of Marc Thuillier)

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and that would answer your other question

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Yesterday was the yearly collectors meeting at the Absinthe Museum in Auvers sur Oise and here is what I bought there: a souvenir-medal made by Terminus for the 1895 Bordeaux exhibition.

 

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Interesting! and nice find! :cheers:

 

Rough translation " Souviner of my climbing of the Giant Absinthe Terminus Bottle"

 

So I would imagine that the tiny figures at the bottom of the medal would give a scale to the size of the bottle-tower. And that looks like a walkway at the 'neck' of the bottle.

 

Do any pictures or postcards of this giant bottle exist?

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We've tried to find one but couldn't for the moment.

Photographic postcards were quite rare in France in 1895.

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Very rare finds. Unique so congrats!

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That must have been a great meeting Marc... damn that ocean. A very nice piece, and perfect for the unique heartbeat of your collection! I've seen people climb IN a bottle, never UP one!

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