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Wild Bill Turkey

Marianne's new Clothes

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Looks like the Clandestine "Marianne" recipe by Bugnon ( the regular Clandestine recipe, in the blue bottle, is called "Charlotte" if you look closely at the back label) has gotten a new label, and a new name.

Marianne

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That's the one I got from Markus. I didn't realize it's different from the original.

 

Edit: On closer examination, maybe that's not the one I got from Markus.

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I think he's shooting himself in the foot. Lots of people wouldn't realize they are different products. He paid for one label design, and he's slapped it on the front of four or five different products, so they all look the same.

 

What does he have against label designers? We have to drink, too!

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I think he's shooting himself in the foot. Lots of people wouldn't realize they are different products. He paid for one label design, and he's slapped it on the front of four or five different products, so they all look the same.

 

What does he have against label designers? We have to drink, too!

 

Yes, but at least he's now supporting website designers with his own site which clearly shows the 3 different products. Hopefully in English soon.

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I thought they were two seperate recepies anyway, and being sold as such?

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Clandestine Artemisia recette Marianne 55% in France = Franco-Suisse 55% sold by Alandia (they made their own label and changed the name of the absinthe).

It's the french "special edition" (less fennel, more melissa and mint) of the famous Clandestine La Bleue 53%. Same recipe for the Clandestine La Bleue 72% called La Capricieuse. This recipe called Charlotte is coming from aunt Charlotte, a swiss woman who invented it in 1935.

You'll read it all of this intersting story by yourself as soon as Claude-Alain Bugnon will translate his website ;)

 

bout-artemisia03.jpg

La Marianne louched

 

By the way, I enjoy very much La Marianne : I find the taste mid-french, mid swiss : special, surprising and good !

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La Capricieuse 72° is the same recipe as Marianne 55°? Damn! That’s not good. I was hoping.

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Oh, cool. So the only difference between La Capricieuse and CLB Marianne is simply alcohol content? Is that correct?

 

Man, heure-verte, you sure know your shit, and all while having the goofiest avatar on the planet!

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Damn, no ! I was not as clear as I wanted. I shouldn't try to write complicated sentences in english :)

 

Clandestine la Bleue 53% is the regular La Bleue

La Capricieuse 72% is the same recipe as the Clandestine la Bleue with a higher alcohol proof

Clandestine Artemisia (Franco-Suisse) La Marianne 55% is the recipe made to fit the french law

 

Voilà !

 

It's not an avatar, it's me :P

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OHHH....

 

So what does the French law have to do with it? Does France regulate alcohol content? Or is La Marianne sans AA, or something?? Is it thujone, or alcohol content is what I'm trying to say?

 

Also, why did they make a higher proof of the classic La Bleue? Just for something to do?

 

Aaron

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What the hell are you guys talking about?

 

Is it the porckchop, or is "frenchone" real??

 

This is confusing. Where's heure-verte? He is good about this stuff....

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FENCHONE, no r.

It's one of the many oils contained in fennel, others which are: anethole, camphene, camphor, limonene, etc...

Different fennels contain differing amounts of these oils so they will add different flavors to the absinthe.

France regulates the amount of fenchone allowed in the final product,

hence the Clandestine Artemisia recette Marianne contains less fennel to fit French laws.

 

Got it?

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This is confusing. Where's heure-verte? He is good about this stuff....

 

Probably sleeping.

 

For another photo of Luc and his shop, go to gadgets and gizmos and follow the Brouille thread.

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The word "frenched" always makes me think of the time my friend offered to take me for a ride in his lowrider, with all of his friends standing around laughing while I tried to figure out how to open the door.

 

"frenched" door handles:

post-209-1141761144.jpg

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I guess I wonder why France would regulate that, that's all. It only effects taste, right? Isn't that one of the good things about absinthe? It is always a little different, be it via again or a seperate batch?

 

Is there something about fenchone I'm missing?

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Is there something about fenchone I'm missing?

The french seem to think it will cause leprosy, immoral behaviour, World War III or something in that style. The rest of the world disagrees.

 

François Guy seems to be kind of proud of not using any fennel at all. Like it is some kind of "poor man's anise", only used as a substitute in inferior products.

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Huh. Interesting. But they're cool with thujone, eh?

 

Interesting. I like Swiss stuff better anyway.

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Grey boy is right about fenchone.

I only can add this : I don't know exactly why fenchone is regulated in France, I guess it's because it's a stimulant, it doesn't only affect taste, it's a sort of tonic.

This limit is really a mess for us as we can't have the swiss absinthes (except the Marianne) or others ones like Duplais.

I hope we'll be able to lift off these 2 limits with the "spiritueux aux plantes d'absinthe" thing one day. The 1915 law banning absinthe is still here in France, and the absinthes sold and produced are not considered as absinthes ! Iit's really something crazy.

 

The french laws regulates also pino camphon (le'ss than 20 mg/l), wich coming from Hysope. Never heard about an absinthe who get over that limit...

The big problem is the fenchone and the swiss absinthes, as old french recipes are mostly below fenchone limit as Verte de Foug, Edouard, Blanchette or Verte Suisse...

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I seem to recall that there's a variety of fennel that contains no (or very little) fenchone. Depending on availability, perhaps it would be a better sacrifice than using less of it.

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