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peridot

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Posts posted by peridot


  1. In late '04 I did some (poor) research and ordered some Absente. To my uneducated palate it was pretty good. When I realized you could order proper absinthe I did (this was in '05). Again, I didn't know much yet so most of what I got was pretty bad, mostly oil mixes. None of it was Czechsinth but it wasn't much better than Absente. Still thought it was pretty good. Next order a month or so later I got some Swiss blanches and Jade NO and realized just how shit the earlier stuff was. Within two months I had bought nine bottles, four of which were good.

     

    Not really any cool stories involved, but I have some fun memories going through all of it from the terrible to the excellent with my friends.

     

    In '06 I joined here and then really started learning.


  2. Why can't the absinthe of the past be replicated? Well, my thought on that, with the caveat that I'm not a distiller, is that it's a combination of age (100 years in the bottle can't be matched by modern absinthes) and the fact that no absinthes by modern producers taste the same as each other either. There's a lot of room in the world for different absinthes, and trying to perfectly replicate a dead brand is less interesting to me at least than making something new and amazing. I mean, it's not like every preban brand tasted the same, either. If everyone was duplicating preban absinthes there would be a lot of great absinthe in the world to drink, but my favourite modern brands wouldn't exist.


  3. Good choice. It would be mine as well. I first tried the jade line in 2005, close to it's public inception. I do remember them tasting much better then. Some of what peridot describes is due to the base, pont. WW and obviously trade mark secrets. Are they representative of a truly authentic tasting absinthe prior to the ban like the claim says? Who can say, but Edouard is my favorite of the four.

     

    Pretty sure it's not the Pontarlier wormwood causing the flavours I spoke of. I really enjoy that wormwood in other absinthes, and it has a character that jumps out at me. I've always assumed it was the base causing Jade funk, because I remember Blanche de Fougerolles being really sweaty, too, and that had a similar base if I'm not mistaken.

     

    Before I had preban, Edouard was how I imagined preban would taste. Then I had 1910 Pernod Fils and, despite sharing some auxiliary similarities, the difference in character was absolute and overwhelming. Edouard was dark, heavy, and kind of reminded me of homemade chocolate chip cookies. Pernod Fils was shockingly summery and crisp. It took me aback.


  4. The Duplais right now...based on the bottlings I have are NOT great. A handful of people are finding that there's a dip in the quality in flavor after a few years of some products...usually it improves again later, but I've tried all three Duplais in the last year and they're not great at the moment (but I'm hopeful for the future). Would party-goers notice this problem? Probably not.

     

    That's too bad. Balance was fantastic when it was new. Of course those were the days before the US brands came about and raised the bar a bit, and its prototype was better than the finished product. But I still found it excellent.


  5. Carbonization (caramel and chocolate flavours), male human underarm sweat (similar to cumin) and, just in NO, salt. Not as in a salty taste, but the flavour of salt. The Jades taste very dark and murky to me, as opposed to the bright, crisp freshness of absinthes I tend to prefer. The sweat is least prominent in Edouard, and the darkness works for it. I also think the first Belle Amie (haven't had any of the later batches) is very dark tasting, but delicious. But on the whole I prefer things that taste like a sunny summer afternoon (Ridge, Meadow of Love) more than things that taste like a warm fireplace on a winter night (Edouard.) If that makes any sense.

     

    My five year old bottle of Lucid has the sweat something fierce. Some people taste it, others don't; it's like the soapy flavour some people taste in cilantro.

     

    Taste memory has faded a little bit. Having to reacquaint myself with a couple things here.


  6. Thing is, in the past, deadlines got people to do stuff. For all three completed compilations we very little interest until mid October, and then with the deadline up in 2 weeks, BAM! Everything came flooding in.

     

    Just seems like there aren't enough people left who are interested in doing it, which is fine. But it would be cool to try getting everyone who is left to collaborate on material.


  7. Maybe we should consider a new approach with the reduced membership interest. We could actually try getting a few people who are interested to each come up with a handful of compositions and then pass them around a circle, adding stuff to them. Instead of being a compilation it would be a collective.


  8. The worst thing that called itself absinthe that I've had was King of Spirits Gold. Le Tourment Verte was also bad-bad.

     

    The worst all-the-parts-are-there oil mix absinthe I've had was Montana 68, and that's just a stumble up from LTV.

     

    The worst legitimate, distilled with loving care absinthe I've had was Angelique. It tasted like toothpaste and was awful in a sad but hilarious way. And yet still very drinkable compared to the other things I've listed.


  9. I always triage-buy, and then try to get samples to find out what else is good.

     

    There are plenty of less impressive absinthes that I find perfectly drinkable, and that I would probably buy if they were the 30-40 bucks I'd spend on other "okay" boozes. Instead they're 60, 70, 80, 90 dollars, and I can get things I truly love for those prices.

     

    And honestly I just don't have much disposable income at all. $90 is a lot of money to me, and it's not going toward mediocre absinthe.

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