Jump to content

FarbrengenVerte

Member
  • Content Count

    16
  • Joined

  • Last visited

About FarbrengenVerte

  • Rank
    Newcomer
  • Birthday 02/10/1979

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    Array

Profile Information

  • Location
    Array
  • Interests
    Array
  1. A Friend of mine send me a photo of the bottle asking about it. I couldn't find much on it but advised against it as I normally do when Absinth is spelled without the final "e." Nevertheless, I thought I'd throw it up here to see if anyone knew more.
  2. Luscious Oily Lesbians!. I can assure you that I was drinking some Lucid while writing that... actually two . But then again, that's the whole point. I plan on drinking a lot of Absinthe... I just have to be more particular than most people. SO I figured the people here could help me determine which Absinthes are for sure made with grain and beats eor something other than grapes and which are not.
  3. Hey Baubel! And Gut Woch ! Where are you writing from? Thanks for your post and for the opportunity of me to clarify. By Kosher I am only referring to the strictest Orthodox Jewish interpretation and in no way mean to debase the brands listed as not kosher. People who keep kosher will be grateful to know that they cannot partake of those and the brands that are listed usually know that they are. Some have even looked into Kosher certification and even have affiliation with a brand that has Kosher certification (I am thinking of Jade and Lucid). When it comes to grape based products and Kosher, wine, more than any other food or drink, represents the holiness and separateness of the Jewish people. It is used for the sanctification of Shabbat and Yom Tov and at Jewish simchot. In the Beit Hamikdash wine was poured upon the altar together with the sacrifice. However, since wine was and still is used in many forms of idolatrous worship, it has a unique status in Jewish law, which places extra restrictions on the making and handling of wine. This includes wine used for non-ceremonial purposes. The production and handling of kosher wine must be done exclusively by Jews. Wine, grape juice, and all products containing wine or grape juice must remain solely in Jewish hands during the manufacturing process and also after the seal of the bottle has been opened. We are not allowed to drink any wine or grape juice, or any drink containing wine or grape juice, which has been touched by a non-Jew after the seal of the bottle has been opened. Like all things there is of course an exception and that is wine that is Yayin Mevushal or Boiled Wine Kosher wine (or grape juice) which has been boiled prior to the bottling process is called yayin mevushal. In the time of the Temple, boiling wine rendered it unfit to be brought upon the Altar. Yayin mevushal is not considered "sacramental wine" and is therefore not included in the prohibition against being handled by non-Jews. This wine must, as with all kosher wines, bear the symbol of a reliable supervision organization and it should say yayin mevushal. A wide variety of domestic and imported kosher wines under reliable supervision has been added to the sweet Concords traditionally associated with kosher wines. Many of these wines are yayin mevushal, as indicated on the label. Grape Ingredients In Processed Foods and Absinthes All liquids produced from fresh or dried grapes, whether alcoholic or non-alcoholic, such as grape juice, and wine vinegar, are in the same category as wine in Jewish Law. Therefore, foods with grape flavoring or additives must always have a reliable hechsher (certification). Examples are jam, soda, popsicles, candy, juice packed fruit, fruit punch, and lemonade. Alcoholic drinks such as cognac, brandy and Absinthes that have wine bases fall into the same category.This goes for liqueurs and blended whiskeys that are often blended with wine. All such beverages require kosher supervision, as does herring in wine sauce. Even cream of tartar is made from wine sediment and needs rabbinical supervision. I should note that even amongst orthodox circles there is a discrepancy. Even though a distillery might only ever use grain neutral spirits, there are many orthodox Jews who will not consume the product unless it has a certification or is on a approved list (see end of post). Passover Under normal circumstances you are correct that a grape-based Absinthe would be Kosher for Passover. But this would only be the case if A) The wine or grape was kosher and that the distillery does not also use grain-based products in their equipment or thoroughly cleaned the equipment in between batches. Also, if the distillery is owned by Jews. I should note that grain-based distilleries owned by a Jew or Jews must shut down during the week of Passover, and/or sell all their grain to a non-Jew during the week of Passover, in order to continue producing a Kosher product as grain owned by a Jew during Passover becomes unfit (not kosher). All of this is, as I am sure you are aware, based on the law of Chametz. For those that don't know what I am talking about, Chametz is any food product made from wheat, barley, rye, oats, spelt, or their derivatives, which has leavened (risen). Our sages have determined that flour from any of these five grains that comes in contact with water or moisture will leaven, unless fully baked within eighteen minutes (matzah). As we are commanded by the Torah, if a food contains even a trace of chametz, we don’t eat it, we don’t derive benefit from it, and we make sure not to have any of it in our possession for all the days of Passover. 19 Seven days shall there be no leaven found in your houses; for whosoever shall eatnthat which is leavened, that soul shall be cut off from the congregation of Israel, whether he be a sojourner, or one that is born in the land. 20 Ye shall eat nothing leavened; in all your habitations shall ye eat unleavened bread.' {P} Hence the Matzah. To be certain that a product is kosher for Passover, it must have rabbinical certification. Otherwise it is possible that it contains chametz ingredients, or traces of chametz if it was processed on the same equipment as chametz products. Thus, unless a product is certified Kosher for Passover, we consider it chametz, and make sure not to have it in our possession on Passover. What foes this mean for Absinthe? Any time grains (wheat, barley, spelt, rye or oat) ferment or come into contact with hot liquids, the result is chametz. Many types of alcohol are made of, or contain, fermented grain and are therefore chametz. Alcoholic beverages made of other substances are permitted. In fact there is kosher for Passover plum brandy and potato vodka. Before purchasing, Orthodox Jews ascertain that the beverage is certified as kosher for Passover. As far as I understand, Lucid Absinthe is not certified Kosher for Passover even though it uses Beet alcohol instead of grain. Ashkenazic Jews, who traditionally refrain from eating legumes on Passover, avoid alcohol produced from legumes as well. In addition, there are some (including Chabad) who traditionally avoid all alcohol on Passover (with the exception of wine). The whole purpose of my effort is because I saw the low-quality absinthes rise to the top on Kosher lists, so I might to make sure that the higher quality ones have an opportunity to get in front of this spirit loving demographic. Especially as Purim approaches ;-). If you are interested in a list of approved alcoholic beverages you can find more information here. http://www.kashrut.com/articles/liquor2/
  4. UPDATED LIST WITH KOSHER CERTIFICATION Lucid - OU - Parve Doubs Premium Absinthe - London Beth Din - Parve Arack Mabrouka Absinthe - Rabbinate K.gt and DT Beit Yosef (Israel) Pernod Absinthe - 40% (REALLY A PASTIS) - London Beth Din - Parve (I am the one that pointed out to them that the PERNOD ABSINTHE 68% Vol listed on p.113 of The Really Jewish Food Guide 2014 as approved Parev is now made with grape alcohol and is therefore NOT KOSHER.) KOSHER BUT LOW QUALITY ABSINTHE Trenet Rodniks - Triangle K - Authorised by Rabanut Harashit of Israel Rodniks Black - Authorised by Rabanut Harashit of Israel Staroplzenecky KOSHER Absinth 64% Absinth 35 Black Absinthe 80 Hapsburg Green Dr.Rauchs 50 cl COULD BE KOSHER (Product Specific) La Muse Verte Pacfique Vieux Carre Kuebler Tenneyson Absinthe Royal Vilya Meadow of Love Walton Waters Marteau Belle Époque (NOT the Master's Reserve, which IS made with grape spirits) Versinthe (Liquoristerie de Provence) Artémisia-Bugnon La Clandestine Absinthe Angélique Verte Suisse - 70 cl Absinthe Butterfly Matter Luginbühl (Tempus Fugit?) Duplias Verte Mansinthe OriginalAbsinthes.com Absinthe Original (I know I know) Absinthe King Gold (Again, I know I know) COULD BE KOSHER (BUT NEEDS TO BE PRODUCT SPECIFIC) Un Emile (Emile Pernod) F Guy Lemercier La Fee NOT KOSHER Any of the Jades :-( St George Leopold La Sorciere Verte and Blance Emperor Norton Pernod Pernod Absinthe 68% Absinthe Pernod Rocette Traditionelle Fguy La Fée XS Francaise Emile Pernot Absinthe Vieux Pontarlier
  5. UPDATED LIST WITH KOSHER CERTIFICATION Lucid - OU - Parve Doubs Premium Absinthe - London Beth Din - Parve Arack Mabrouka Absinthe - Rabbinate K.gt and DT Beit Yosef (Israel) Pernod Absinthe - 40% (REALLY A PASTIS) - London Beth Din - Parve (I am the one that pointed out to them that the PERNOD ABSINTHE 68% Vol listed on p.113 of The Really Jewish Food Guide 2014 as approved Parev is now made with grape alcohol and is therefore NOT KOSHER.) COULD BE KOSHER (Product Specific) La Muse Verte Pacfique Vieux Carre Kuebler Tenneyson Absinthe Royal Vilya Meadow of Love Walton Waters Marteau Belle Époque (NOT the Master's Reserve, which IS made with grape spirits) Versinthe (Liquoristerie de Provence) Artémisia-Bugnon La Clandestine Absinthe Angélique Verte Suisse - 70 cl Absinthe Butterfly Matter Luginbühl (Tempus Fugit?) Duplias Verte Mansinthe OriginalAbsinthes.com Absinthe Original (I know I know) Absinthe King Gold (Again, I know I know) COULD BE KOSHER (BUT NEEDS TO BE PRODUCT SPECIFIC) Un Emile (Emile Pernod) F Guy Lemercier La Fee NOT KOSHER Any of the Jades :-( St George Leopold La Sorciere Verte and Blance Emperor Norton Pernod Pernod Absinthe 68% Absinthe Pernod Rocette Traditionelle Fguy La Fée XS Francaise Emile Pernot Absinthe Vieux Pontarlier
  6. Thanks! This is pastis, not absinthe. Thanks for the clarification. What do you know of the Emilie Pernots?
  7. Hello everyone and thanks for the warm welcome over in the Newbie section. As I mentioned on that thread. I am a new Absinthe drinker that is somewhat limited by what Absinthes I can and cannot drink as I am a religious Jew and adhere to strict Kosher laws. The only thing that could make an Abnsithe not Kosher is its use of grapes, brandy, wine etc in its Alcohol base. This is made somewhat easier in the US with ingredient labeling laws . However, most websites for the importation of Absinthes are not very helpful disclosing what base the alcohol is. My goal here is to create a short list of Absinthe that: A) Are certified Kosher and by whom Could be Kosher (because they are distilled using grain, beet sugar, honey or adhere to the strict guidelines behind a kosher grape product). Is it all grain all the time. Do they also make a wine based absinthe. If so are the same distillery equipment used etc. Its important to note that for some Jews, this information is ok while others will not partake of the drink unless it has a Kosher certification or is listed on a Kosher supervised service website C) For sure uses grape products. I have reached out to a few distilleries, all of which have been very familiar with the issues involved. What I have learned is that being brand specific is no longer good enough as some brands will have a variation of both or will make other type of spirits with grape bases. When that is the case deeper questions must be asked. As learn more I will ad to directly to this post BASED ON PAST THREADS & EMAILS AND MORE, HERE IS WHAT I HAVE LEARNED SO FAR: WITH KOSHER CERTIFICATION Lucid - OU - Parve Doubs Premium Absinthe - London Beth Din - Parve Pernod Absinthe - 40% - London Beth Din - Parve (I am the one that pointed out to them that the PERNOD ABSINTHE 68% Vol listed on p.113 of The Really Jewish Food Guide 2014 as approved Parev is now made with grape alcohol and is therefore NOT KOSHER.) COULD BE KOSHER (Product Specific) La Muse Verte Pacfique Vieux Carre Kuebler Tenneyson Absinthe Royal Vilya Meadow of Love Walton Waters Marteau Belle Époque (NOT the Master's Reserve, which IS made with grape spirits) Versinthe (Liquoristerie de Provence) Artémisia-Bugnon La Clandestine Absinthe Angélique Verte Suisse - 70 cl Absinthe Butterfly Matter Luginbühl (Tempus Fugit?) Duplias Verte Mansinthe OriginalAbsinthes.com Absinthe Original (I know I know) Absinthe King Gold (Again, I know I know) COULD BE KOSHER (BUT NEEDS TO BE PRODUCT SPECIFIC) Un Emile (Emile Pernod) F Guy Lemercier La Fee NOT KOSHER Any of the Jades :-( St George Pernod PERNOD ABSINTHE 68% Absinthe Pernod Rocette Traditionelle Fguy La Fée XS Francaise Emile Pernot Absinthe Vieux Pontarlier
  8. Alan Had your La Cladestine this past shabbat and it was wonderful! I can tell that I am more of a Verte guy but this was way better than the Kübler I tried a couple of days ago which, for some reason, reminded me more of Tequila than Absinthe. Justin
  9. Found his little bit of interesting Absinthe history. For those of you that don't know, Havadalah is the ritual that religious Jews do to mark the end of the Jewish Sabbath (and other festivals like Rosh Hashanah, Succos, Yom Kippur, Passover etc). It usually involves, fire, nice smelling herbs and always includes wine or some beverage (the discussion of what kind of beverage can be used for Havadalah could take pages and pages...but apparently Absinthe is ok. This particular story is from a translation of a letter sent by the 6th Lubuvitcher Rebbe Yosef Yitzchak Schneersohn (known internally as the Rayatz) to his daughter, Rebbetzin Chayah Mushka, who eventually became the wife of the Rebbe most of us know so well. I won't post the whole thing here but here is a blurb. You can read the whole story here. http://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/2313049/jewish/Chapter-Seven-After-Yom-Kippur-with-the-Maggid.htm The attached picture is a photoshop version of the fabragan wine label to give you an idea of what this might have looked like. -
  10. Actually, there is such a rule for US made and legally-imported absinthes. If you read your labels you'll find a statement such as "Grain spirits distilled and infused with herbs". We plan to get certified once we have our own distillery, but we're subleasing now. Thanks Gwedion, Ill have to try your Absinthe next I can also add: Vieux Carre Absinthe Superieure Versinthe (Liquoristerie de Provence) Even though Un Emile is reportedly made with grains base, I have to remove it from the list for now as I recently learned that Vieux Pontarlier, which is distilled by them, uses grape. So now its just a matter if they use the same equipment or if they are made at the same locations etc. I have tried contacting them but received no answer. And thats for the note about US labels. I will look for them. Today I was in a liquid store and saw a bottle of Abyss and just for kicks looked for it on the label and couldn't find it. Nevertheless, when it comes to sites like Absinthes.net and the like, this info is of no help as its almost never discussed in the descriptions and even rarely by the distillers themselves. Someone from Absinthes.net told me that everything on the site is made with grain or beet based alcohol unless otherwise mentioned which I soon discovered to be untrue. I also saw the the Beit Din in England listed Pernod Absinthe as Kosher not releasing that the new recipe used grape. I straghted that up with them. When it comes to Kosher and Absinthe its a real mess out there. Im trying to straighten it all out.
  11. Thanks Evan! Nice to meet you! Thanks for the lead. Ill contact them. Are you Jewish?
  12. Hey Alan! Nice to put a face things. You are right, I forgot to ad Le Clandestine to my list. I actually bought a small bottle as a treat for this Shabbos (Shabbat / you are supposed to put the good stuff you find during the week away until then) and am looking forward to it! Lucid has an OU hechser so even though its distilled at Jade its all Kosher. Which F Guys use Grape? I think I am going to have to get product instead of brand specific with all of this. I removed Emile Pernot as a brand because they produce some grape based and some grain based. I have heard that the Un Emile is grained base but without knowing what is what I don't feel safe assuming any of it Kosher. Its all about the details I'm going to update my lists and start a new forum I think. Thanks Evan, Ill look into it. Are you a Yid?
  13. Thanks Gwedion, Ill have to try your Absinthe next I can also add: Vieux Carre Absinthe Superieure Versinthe (Liquoristerie de Provence) Even though Un Emile is reportedly made with grains base, I have to remove it from the list for now as I recently learned that Vieux Pontarlier, which is distilled by them, uses grape. So now its just a matter if they use the same equipment or if they are made at the same locations etc. I have tried contacting them but received no answer. And thats for the note about US labels. I will look for them. Today I was in a liquid store and saw a bottle of Abyss and just for kicks looked for it on the label and couldn't find it. Nevertheless, when it comes to sites like Absinthes.net and the like, this info is of no help as its almost never discussed in the descriptions and even rarely by the distillers themselves. Someone from Absinthes.net told me that everything on the site is made with grain or beet based alcohol unless otherwise mentioned which I soon discovered to be untrue. I also saw the the Beit Din in England listed Pernod Absinthe as Kosher not releasing that the new recipe used grape. I straghted that up with them. When it comes to Kosher and Absinthe its a real mess out there. Im trying to straighten it all out.
  14. Kübler was my first Blanche Is it just me or does Kübler have a kind of "oh know, not that night I drank to much tequila" taste to it. I swear I taste something similar to tequila (and I am one of those people that cant do tequila anymore). I drank one glass. Then I poured another thinking I added to much water. I went 1:4 on it and was like, "nope, taste like tequila." I poured it out and washed it down with a Le Muse Verte and then a Lucid (If that says anything). Anyone know what I am talking about? I have a bottle of Clandastine, but am afraid to try it now. Do all Blanches have that tatse? I ordered a bottle of Duplas and and cant wait for that to come. Maybe im just a Verte guy?
×