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PerfesserCoffee

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About PerfesserCoffee

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  • Birthday 01/28/1962

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  1. Here I am on video losing my absinthe "virginity" for those who may have missed it on this thread: http://wormwoodsociety.org/forums/index.ph...=7552&st=90 Since then I've been drinking it about every two or three days--just a small drink--and doing so without the sugar. I'm thinking I like it without the sugar a bit better now that I'm acclimated. I get the full effect of the herbs that way and am really appreciating them. The herbs seem to have a clearing effect on the sinuses which I'd term to be truly medicinal. And the overall effect is really remarkable compared to say, a few sips of whiskey with equal alcoholic content. I'm assuming the effect is due to the herbs since, chemically, there is no difference in alcohol from drink to drink. Consider me a fan of the green fairy! I'm definitely grateful to the makers of (1855 recipe) Pacifique and it will, undoubtedly, be a major standard to which I'll compare subsequent varieties of absinthe.
  2. Yeah, I've had good luck packing them away in a wooden crate. Inside their wrappers, they stay very fresh for months. BTW: I'm smoking one of the Marsh Wheelings in my profile pic. I have no idea what Cuban cigars are like. I suppose they come in a variety of flavors and strengths, right? I researched cigars a while back and was glad to discover that cigars have been around since the 18th century, pipes being the first way of smoking tobacco, I think.
  3. Like absinthe, I don't have a lot experience, but after a bit of research have come across the Marsh Wheeling Deluxe II http://www.tophatcigar.com/a.cfm//Machine-...e-Ii---EMS.html as being, I think, fairly representative of a mid-19th century cigar. It is a mild sweet cigar that seems to go with anything and everything. I've tried stronger cigars and just gotten sick as a result but that may just be me. The MW's give me a mild buzz and pleasant taste and go well with my reenacting. I usually only smoke cigars on reenactment weekends and that's the only time I smoke period. I want to try cigars with absinthe to see what that combination is like.
  4. I agree. The name brand has been very badly damaged IMHO. Considering their reputation in the old days, they had the perfect launch point for dominating the modern market with a quality product and chucked it all.
  5. And, strangely enough, coming up soon on the second season of Bewitched: Richard Dreyfuss as Rodney, the neurotic warlock. Should be a good one!
  6. Fascinating bit of trivia there! I had no idea. I always like pointing stuff like that out to my girlfriend. We are working our way through the 1960's series, Bewitched and I'm getting to point out all the guest stars as well the "rules" of witchcraft as they come up within the context of the series. Silly but fun stuff. Samantha giving the "witch's honor" pledge. George Pal's The Time Machine is a great movie. I like the book more, naturally, but the movie was very faithful in most respects. IMHO, the recent movie remake of The Time Machine a few years back was
  7. so having an vintage stove make you a good cook ? Succeeding in an macarons recipe by only having the ingredient too ? No to both, but in following the period recipes, ingredients, and procedures (there's a lot more information out there than one might think on such obscure details), after some practice you should be able to turn out a reasonable facsimile of what our ancestors ate. Since food isn't typically stored for 150 years, that's all we have to go by. Even with items that are stored, the length of time can and will affect the taste. I'm resigned to those limitations but still dream about a time machine.
  8. Thanks! I'll volunteer my basement for your "forgotten" absinthe! Yeah, I wore the hat for "effect" since I got into a hurry and didn't find a more appropriate place to sit in the house so there wasn't an air conditioner partly visible as well as sci-fi models perhaps visible in the cabinet behind me. I figured I needed a prop to help make up for the lack of authenticity. In bars, I've seen evidence that hats were worn indoors though I haven't really researched that to death. I suspect in the lower class bars, at least, the custom was to wear hats during the 19th century. Does anyone out there happen to know?
  9. Yeah, that's kind of what I was thinking. The best that can be done is to use period recipes and equipment. I'm still hoping for a time machine though.
  10. Interesting! I'll try to vary that factor then and see if I can tell a difference.
  11. I meant to comment on that. It's like watching me louche a drink. I measure the ratio about the same way also. Hey, as long as it still tastes good, what's the harm in doing a little eyeballing of such measurements?
  12. Thanks, everyone, for the compliments on the video! I suppose the public speaking over the last several months has helped me a little bit. Usually, I'm too nervous to pull these kinds of things off. Hopefully, I'm not turning into a sociopath or something and losing my authentic self . . . Anyway, yes, I want to try some more domestic offerings. Looking forward to eventually getting up a cabinet with a variety of absinthe.
  13. After I finished the video, I tried putting a little sugar in the absinthe/water combination and found that I liked the flavor better sweetened a bit. I tend to put sugar in coffee due to my liking the combination of sweet and bitter so this was not unexpected for me. It was fine without the sugar but the sugar gave it a bit more of a relish to the flavor, especially bringing out the anise flavoring. A friend was on hand who drinks socially and tried it. Her reaction was that it was too bitter for her--and she's not a big licorice fan--but she liked it much better with the sugar added. My girlfriend, who videoed the event, has only tasted wine and once had brandy rubbed on her gums as a child--she's otherwise pretty much a teetotaler--didn't wind up caring much for it but was determined to at least taste it due to her outrage at the governmental powers that be having effectively outlawed the drink for so many decades. She also tried it with some sugar in it but it didn't do much to improve it for her. Still, she was a very good sport about it and it took this sort of historical drink to get her interest up in trying anything at all alcoholic. It may be a while before I can get up the resources, but I'm bound and determined to try other brands so I'm still taking recommendations of people's favorites.
  14. Sorry so late getting this ready. I was hoping to have gotten this up LAST weekend but hopefully it's better a week late than never. Thanks for everyone's help! I couldn't have done it without y'all's expertise! Hope y'all enjoy the video!
  15. Thanks for the explanation. I had no idea that such a distinction was made. I think, however, that I have mostly used the spelling with the "e" at the end, that being preferable to me since, I supposed, that is the French spelling of the word. BTW: The "first taste" video is done--recharging the camera now due to low battery. Should have it uploaded and linked by Monday--hopefully tomorrow. I'll let any "suspense" build up until the premiere of the video
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