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Alan Moss

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  1. La Capricieuse is not available in the USA.
  2. Here are a few D/FW fine spirit retail locations stocking one or both of my absinthes (La Clandestine & Butterfly): Goody-Goody Sigel’s Pogo’s Liquor – 5360 W. Lovers Lane, Dallas Pk’s Liquor – 6465 E. Mockingbird Lane, Dallas Lakewood Medallion Liquor – 5748 Live Oak St, Dallas Bottle Giant Liquor – 1751 East Chase Pkwy, Fort Worth
  3. Here I am, fpb! 1. Absinthe sales exploded everywhere it was legalised in the first 2/3 years following re-legalisation, much of that driven by people drinking absinthe for the wrong reasons and in the wrong way. 2. The thrill seekers were naturally disappointed not to find the green fairy, so dropped out. 3. Some retailers and bars thought that this was because consumers didn't like absinthe, so stocked fewer brands. 4. The effect of 2 and 3 together could have been as much as a 50% drop in sales from the first few years. 5. People drinking absinthe the right way(s) and for the right reasons then discover absinthe and the market starts to grow again. This has happened in UK, USA, Canada, much of Europe, Australia etc. The negative aspects above were predicted here in 2009, as was the more positive side of cocktail consumption of absinthe. I believe that the US market is growing right now, but there are probably a few too many local brands jumping onto the bandwagon, without getting the quality right. Obviously that doesn't apply to all of them. I estimate that around 30 - 40 of the c. 120 absinthes approved for US launch either never made it or have disappeared because they couldn't make money in a crowded market (Good news: that includes LTV. Bad news: that includes Obsello etc). US distribution is not so easy either. Apart from Lucid, Kübler and Pernod, I doubt that there are many absinthes in more than 30 States. Finally, I doubt if there is any other drinks category which has such a high proportion of sales in the USA that do not go via the normal 3 tier distribution system (importer/manufacturer > distributor > retailer or bar). That's not a criticism: it's a fact, partly caused by local retailers not satisfying local demand.
  4. Give me some notice, and I'll try to get you a visit at the Artemisia Distillery in Couvet. At that time of year, it can be quite busy and we have a lot of groups visiting. So it's best to book. If you go, you should also visit La Maison de l'Absinthe in Môtiers: the world's largest absinthe museum. Of course the best time to visit would be June 17/18 for the Absinthe Festival at Boveresse ..
  5. This book is quoted as having the first documented Martini recipe. And it is shown as having the option to be made with a dash of absinthe. The Manhattan also includes an absinthe option which works well.
  6. Feel free to pm me for a tour with Claude-Alain. Although he doesn't deliberately turn people away, if you arrive 5 minutes after a group of 50 people, you won't get the best possible tour. The Fete de l'Absinthe in mid-June is a great time to go, with hundreds of international visitors and special dinners organised by Marc from Absinthe Originals. There is an event page about this within the Absinthe Originals Facebook page.
  7. Try searching on the form at the bottom of this page. There are a few absinthes that you can get in PA on a Special Order of just one bottle, including La Clandestine, Butterfly, Giger and Cooper & Kings.
  8. Hi-Time in Costa Mesa has a good selection too.
  9. Glad you enjoyed La Clandestine. I don't see any seasonality of absinthe production, but sales peak in October, November and December for most spirits, and some stores might reduce stocks out-of-season. I think you are describing K & L Wine Merchants who currently show 20 "absinthe" lines in stock and another 37 out-of-stock. In fact, a lot of these are bitters or pastis etc. Leaving those out, they still show a lot of absinthes out-of-stock but I think that is more a matter of K & L's choice. Obsello and Le Tourment Vert are no longer in production.
  10. What absinthes do you have, and what province are you returning to?
  11. "Americans try absinthe for the first time?" It's a sham. One of the girls (Kelsey) made and drank absinthe cocktails on The Tipsy Bartender two years ago. So she's now lost her absinthe virginity a second time. Proof of one absinthe "effect." Absinthe makes the mind go wander.
  12. A blanche might not need any sugar. I also suggest you try them all at a lower ratio (3:1?) and then add a little water until you find your own preferred level with each of them. And rather than trying to taste eight at one time, maybe split into two sessions with four each.
  13. Depending where you are in Socal, Hi-Time in Costa Mesa has a good selection too.
  14. Catskill deliver to Utah.
  15. Thanks, Monster. And it was also the anniversary of Patrick Dempsey's birthday (1822): presumably that is where he got his name from. I'll leave others to comment on Butterfly in the classic serve. What I have found interesting is how popular it has been in cocktails, especially in London, but now also in Boston, Melbourne, etc. That may be because of its citrus and mint notes: these have contributed to its use it in some very interesting cocktails. I wasn't surprised to see the Flutterby Lassi (yoghurt and a full measure of Butterfly), and this really works well as a digestif cocktail in London's top Indian restaurant. The Pealini has been a surprising success: salted pea cordial, spearmint, Butterfly absinthe, citric acid, prosecco, and British summer(!!). For those of you in or near Boston, Butterfly cocktails are being served at an absinthe dinner at The Study, Cambridge on April 16th. We don't know what Patrick Dempsey would have thought of all those new-fangled ideas, so my St. Patrick's Day cocktail was the more classic Blackthorn cocktail (1922 or earlier) with Irish whiskey, vermouth and Butterfly.
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