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TrainerAZ

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Posts posted by TrainerAZ


  1. I've never heard of methanol triggering headaches, most likely the artificial coloring. If you are willing to pay for it, and send me a sample, I can have it analyzed for methanol content.

    Thanks, Z . . . though I was concerned about methanol poisoning having caused not the migraine, but the persistent double vision (a symptom of methanol poisoning).

     

    Ophthalmologist today investigated and informed me that last week's 3-day migraine damaged my 4th cranial nerve, which controls the superior oblique muscle, one of three muscles which move my left eye. It is now weakened, so my left eye "rides high" compared to the right, causing the double vision. I also have slight edema in my left retina, causing a small blind spot.

     

    It will take up to 6 months before I know if the damage is permanent. There is a good chance the nerve damage is permanent and fixing it may require surgery; the edema will probably resolve on its own. Meanwhile, I'll be seeing a neurologist and a migraine specialist to be sure I don't have any MORE 3-day, neurologically-damaging migraines.

     

    I'd rather have a drink. Even if it's AO! (Slowly steering back to on-topic . . .)


  2. Ethanol is the treatment I hear.

     

    Good to see you back OR Welcome Back TrainerAZ.

     

    Hope you feel better quick.

     

    :cheers:

    That'd be the treatment I'm pursuing. From sources of known quality.

     

    The other options aren't so glamorous as methanol poisoning. Macular degeneration, stroke, transient ischemic attack (mini-stroke), multiple sclerosis, brain tumor near optic nerve . . . I can really pass on any of them.

     

    How's you kids? And howdy, Absomphe!


  3. Long time, no post . . .

     

    I also tried the AO, having seen it so very inexpensive and tempting in my local Oregon state-run liquor store. (Currently available alternatives are Lucid at $65, Absente, and various Czechsinths, all over $45. Oh, and Le Tourment whatever in the pretty sandblasted bottle. Have had Marteau at $82 and St. George at the same; neither is stocked anymore. Marteau is nice, St. George is odd. Not bad, just odd. Coriander, maybe?)

     

    At its price point, AO is what it is, and the name is entirely accurate. It's absolutely an oil mix (surprise!). It's not something I'd compare favorably even with Lucid, but it's drinkable. Someone having it as his first taste of absinthe would not necessarily be turned off; as Ken pointed out, it's not bitter or anything. It's just not really anything.

     

    On a side note, if anyone can test the product for methanol, I'd be eternally grateful. Trying to rule out causes for last week's 3-day migraine which left me with persistent double vision. Methanol poisoning is by far the most pleasant -- and most reversible -- medical cause I can find for double vision. Seeing doctor tomorrow (HMO is taking the "delay so maybe you die first" approach).

     

    Just in case it IS methanol poisoning, I'm doing some home treatment right now. :cheers:


  4. Hmm, Powis Castle used to be listed as "Artemisia absinthium 'Powis Castle'", and now is "Artemisia X 'Powis Castle'.

     

    Apparently it's been determined not to be a variety of A.a. but a hybrid between A.a. and Artemisia arborescens.

     

    Vewwy intewwesting. Or not, depending upon your areas of interest.

     

    If you found this post uninteresting, I suggest you skip it and move on to the next one.


  5. I read something more recent about the energy drinks, here: http://www.beachbody.com/jump.jsp?itemID=6...WSLETTER_ISSUES

     

    Newsletter # 267, if the link doesn't work right.

     

    An excerpt:

     

    Caffeine is cheap, as is coffee, and the average cup of coffee has three times more caffeine than the average energy drink. There are whole Web sites set up to help you do the math on this. One such site, Energyfiend.com, lists the milligrams of caffeine per ounce contained in each energy drink. The more commercial brands, like Rockstar and Red Bull, have far less than some of the more esoteric brands. But nothing, except the one-ounce caffeine shots, beats a good old cup o' joe.

     

    While the above-listed ingredients are the flagship ingredients of promotion, they aren't added in amounts that are effective. If you like the science behind taurine or inositol, you're better off buying it in bulk and then drinking plain coffee or tea.


  6. While I know there has been a lot of hype with Absinthe, I have to say that I really didn't feel drunk/buzzed at all, was quite "lucid" (pun intended) in my thoughts and conversations. I'll definately try it again next weekend, with more being consumed to see if it is truly a "lucid" high/drunk or not.

    Congratulations, you've now experienced absinthe's much-hyped "secondary effects"!

     

    You had the equivalent of six to seven shots of standard 80-proof (that is, 40%) vodka in a short period, and didn't feel drunk/buzzed.

     

    Huh? Yes. Three shots of Lucid at 62% alcohol = 4.5 shots of vodka, roughly, plus two doses of Korbel (alcohol content of one glass wine = one oz. vodka) = 6.5 shots vodka equivalent.

     

    It's not a hallucinogen. The effect is just a more alert intoxication.

     

    Enjoy!


  7. I went to PF Chang's not long ago with friends (yep, I have some of those). They have a cocktail they call a Zen Press.

     

    Hendrick's, cucumber, lemongrass, and a little tonic or soda water.

     

    Apparently the cucumber and lemongrass are "pressed", cuz there were no veggie bits in the drink.

     

    Very tasty. And we're pretty sure they also added ginger.

     

    Edit: here's a blurb or two I found on it.

     

    P.F. Chang’s, which has nearly 100 U.S. outlets, introduced a specialty drink list last September that featured a popular cucumber-inspired cocktail called Zen Press. It includes cucumber-and-rose-petal-infused gin flavored with lemon grass syrup and muddled cucumber slices.

     

    It is served on the rocks and garnished with mint and lime and sells for about $6.50 depending on the location. “The Press is a classic drink, but we serve it with a modern twist,” Cherry says. “The cleanness of the cuke together with the lemon grass is a perfect match.”

     

    I liked – loved – this drink so much, I had my friend, who steered up through the night with great recommendations (drink included), ask the bartender how the drink was made: two slices of cucumber muddled in a glass, a shot of lemongrass syrup, and a shot of gin topped off with Sprite and seltzer. I started off with this formula, and after three drinks had the drink down to a science of me. Of course, size of glass, your taste preferences, and how fast or slow you want to get to par-tay will influence your hand.

     

    Lemongrass Syrup

    1 cup sugar

    1 cup water

    1 stalk lemongrass (readily found at Asian Markets)

     

    Place sugar and water into a small pan. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly until the sugar crystals have dissolved.

    Slice the pale, fleshy base of lemon grass into small rounds and add to the sugar and water mixture.

    Let the syrup cool for at least 30 minutes, or longer for stronger flavoring.

    Strain.

    Zen Press

    Makes 1 drink

     

    1 inch of cucumber, peeled and cut into ¼ inch rounds

    3/4 shot lemongrass syrup

    1 shot Hendrick's Gin

    ice

    Sprite

    Seltzer

     

    Muddle cucumber slices in the bottom of a glass.

    Add lemongrass syrup and gin.

    Stir, and strain into a glass.

    Add ice, and top with a splash of Sprite and Seltzer.


  8. I wonder if the people here shocked at $18/shot for Lucid are used to drinking well drinks at the neighborhood bar. Where do you folks usually go?

     

    I know I pay $4 for a well G&T, or $7 for a T&T. (Most bars I go to don't have Hendrick's.)

     

    Compared to $4, $18 is a lot. If one of those places suddenly had $18 drinks next to the $4 well G&T, I'd not be having too many $18 cocktails. I'd be shocked, too.

     

    If, on the other hand, I was used to a place that served well drinks at $8-10, and call at $12, and top shelf $14 - 15, then $18 for a new product that's not yet readily available everywhere in the US would seem reasonable.

     

    I guess the question is, what's the normal price range at these bars that stock Lucid?

     

    BTW, I can buy a bottle of Tanqueray or Hendrick's for about $30 at the grocery store. 4-5 drinks at the bar, or a whole bottle at home.

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