Jump to content

TR. WILLY

Member
  • Content Count

    161
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Posts posted by TR. WILLY


  1. Hi WhyteKnight

    There still is one more point to be made, and that is recognition factor. If you don't remember the name or the type liquor, the bottle will stand out.

     

    Tanqueray back in the 50s(today I'm not sure since I don't Gin)was the only gin in a green bottle. Lucid will be the only black bottle with green eyes on the shelf (serious recognition factor).

     

    Because of Lucids design it's more in agreement with Shabbas point than mine. since the old world label would blend in more than stand out.

    :cheers:


  2. At $60 a bottle bar price for a cocktail has got to be expensive. As peridot suggested they're price is in conflict with the target group.

    I disagree. While I agree that with the label and the cocktails, Lucid is being geared toward the club crowd, I think you're mistaken about who that crowd is in terms of their money and their demographic.

    There's a whole group of people in my demographic, twenty-five through thirty five, who have good jobs and enough money to go out to clubs and pay for expensive drinks. These are up-and-comings, people with enough money to buy expensive alcohol but not enough class to be drawn to a "classic" design. They are consumers and they go for flash and gimmick over subtlety and style. That's who Tanqueray is marketing to right now and I think it's who Lucid is aiming at.

    Hi martin

    But when you think about isn't the flash and gimmick crowd with in the successful 25 through 35 group very limiting.

    Lucid I think is shooting for a broader demographic, more of the party cocktail crowd in general. As Shabba said; "You can't really fault a company for trying to appeal to the audience that will create the most potential for immediate sale. Those immediate sales will then hopefully boost further sales (and possibly further absinthe education) through word of mouth and recurring business". Which I think is the reason for the bottle design and some of the cocktail recipes. This choice may work, it is a viable strategy

    Now you do have a point Martin. Tony Sinclair is shooting for the successful 25 through 35 year old individual. But in my opinion it's the classy sophisticated crowd with in that group. With this strategy in mind, if you get the classy sophisticated people on board, the rest will follow the same concept as in the 50s.

    As to retail of $60 a bottle and what the bar price for a cocktail will be is one crowd. Green eyes on the bottle and cookies on the rim of the glass seems like the college crowd, not the upwardly mobile crowd. For the upwardly mobile crowd to want it, it must already be a success and considered hot. Especially for you're flash and gimmick people. Right now it isn't even on the market

    :cheers:


  3. TR., your vote of confidence is very kind...but misplaced! Anyone looking for a useful review of Lucid should hop over to Fee Verte and read what Donnie Darko has to say.

    The truth is, Brooks wouldn't know hyssop if it sidled up and popped him in the snoot.

     

    Understood, I should have said that you discuss the tasting in you're post.


  4. Hi Shabba(post#316)

    Agreed, but that post was about market research and the wealth of information that is available in the world of online Absinthe(vendors, societies and blogs ect.)in general. The majority of which are Americans. Not Ted in specific (he is an artist and that's undeniable).

    Tanquerays strategy in the 50s (which worked then and is working now)was if you get the high end crowd the rest will follow. Frank Sinatra and his Rat Pack were the leaders of that crowd.

    What sold Tanqueray was they're marketing strategy not the gin itself.

     

    At $60 a bottle bar price for a cocktail has got to be expensive. As peridot suggested they're price is in conflict with the target group.

     

    Playing devils advocate in regard to my post is appreciated and enjoyed.

     

    Let me be clear. Ted and the Lucid company have my full support in they're effort to bring Absinthe to the U.S.

     

    Hi speedle(post#320)

    I hope the question raised in you're post(#318)has been answered here

     

    :cheers: to all


  5. So you're saying that lucids financial situation is motivating they're marketing strategy,maybe. O.k. But,LDF,Markus and Alandia claim that a vast majority

    of they're sales come from the U.S. not to mention the society,La Fee Verte and others.That's a strong market research to draw from.

     

    Ball is in you're court.

    yes. my holiday is good.

     

    :cheers: to you and I await you're response


  6. Is Jade owned by Americans?

    Keep in mind, this isn't a Jade product. It's a Veridian Spirits product made by Ted.

     

    You also can't really fault a company for trying to appeal to the audience that will create the most potential for immediate sale. Those immediate sales will then hopefully boost further sales (and possibly further absinthe education) through word of mouth and recurring business. That's just good capitalistic strategy.

     

    Hi Shabba

    My post was about choices not about capitalism

     

    I corrected my mistake thanks for the info.

    :cheers:


  7. Hi All

    This post is to explain my position on Lucids marketing strategy

     

    In the 1950s Tanqueray changed its marketing strategy. To appeal the high class sophisticated crowd, with the thinking that the rest of the cocktail drinkers will follow. They did and Tanqueray skyrocketed in its' popularity. They're popularity and a marketing strategy, has survived the test of time. Just ask Tony Sinclair. In the 5os it was Frank Sinatra and his Rat Pack.

     

    Absinthe with its rich and colorful history in the world of art and literature, Oscar Wilde, Toulouse Lautrec, Edouard Manet and Ernest Hemingway just to mention a few. These are the kind of people and credentials that define sophistication, intelligence and class. These are the kind of accolades that would draw people to Absinthe and make them proud to present it at a dinner party as the good stuff. As for cocktails, Hemingway's Death in the Afternoon, Toulouse Lautrec earthquake or others from the Belle Époque era would maintain the connection to the history. So in a way Absinthe would advertise it's self. Every time you hear the name Ernest Hemingway, Toulouse Lautrec and so on you will think Absinthe, as most of us here and at la Fee Verte do already.

     

    Lucid seems to want to ignore all of this and go for the frat boy party crowd with a goofy bottle and cookies crumbs on martini glasses. Is Lucid owned by Americans? Because this strikes me as a Madison Avenue gimmick campaign looking for the fast return for they're money. Also the college party crowd is more likely to get liquored up and do something real crazy that could ruin the Absinthe movement.

     

    In my opinion Tanqueray has the right approach.

     

    :cheers: to all

    TR. :wave2:


  8. My remarks were about the eyes on the bottle and the cookies on the glass.

     

    The image being presented to the public was the inspiration for "this shit stinks"

     

    The contents of the bottle certainly has promise because of the artists involved in its creation and the Absinthe, the distillery already has on the market. They do make some of the best Absinthe in the world.

     

    I am looking forward to tasting Lucid. :cheers: to all

    TR. :wave2: out

×